Adding honey during fermentation - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Adding honey during fermentation

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-26-2012, 11:32 PM   #1
Newrebrewer
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Henniker, NH
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts



Forgot to add my honey during the boil, can I just add it to the fermentor a day later?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:12 AM   #2
rancidcrabtree
Recipes 
 
Jan 2011
Anoka, MN
Posts: 236
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Yeah, there is a greater chance of infection because you aren't adding it to the hot wort in your boil but its not very likely. I've added honey to active fermentation plenty of times and never had any problems.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Lamma spit ain't fun.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:24 AM   #3
IIWolfpakII
Recipes 
 
Mar 2012
Posts: 11

I actually posted about honey earlier today and have been reading up on it quite a bit lately.

From what I've read, you should pasteurize the honey if your adding it into the fermentor so that you don't get any bacteria or anything that can impart off flavors.

I used honey malt instead of using honey. It is much easier, gives a nice honey flavor and there is no risk of unwanted flavors

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 12:49 PM   #4
DD2000GT
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Garland, TX
Posts: 426
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Just mu $.02 - I have added honey to my fermentor several times with absolutely no infections. Honey is naturally resistant to bacteria. Add after high krausen.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:09 PM   #5
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2010
Posts: 11,995
Liked 496 Times on 431 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by IIWolfpakII View Post
I actually posted about honey earlier today and have been reading up on it quite a bit lately.

From what I've read, you should pasteurize the honey if your adding it into the fermentor so that you don't get any bacteria or anything that can impart off flavors.

I used honey malt instead of using honey. It is much easier, gives a nice honey flavor and there is no risk of unwanted flavors
Actually zero need to pasteurize the honey before adding it. I just warm it slightly in a hot tap water bath just to get it to flow better. The paranoia about pasteurizing honey is completely misplaced.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:26 PM   #6
IIWolfpakII
Recipes 
 
Mar 2012
Posts: 11

Is there no need to pasteurize the honey just because commercial honey is already pasteurized or just because the anti-bacteria properties of honey? Are there any difficulties due to possible wild yeast present in honey?

I'm definitely not trying to disagree at all; I'm just trying to figure this out as well. I've used honey only a few times, but was reading up on it lately because I was thinking of using it in the recipe I brewed last night. Ended up using honey malt instead...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:32 PM   #7
william_shakes_beer
Recipes 
 
Oct 2010
Maryland
Posts: 2,573
Liked 223 Times on 179 Posts


I have used honey in my favorite recipie twice now. Added to the boil. Got little to no honey flavor. I'm thinking next time priming with honey to see what it gets me.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 01:45 PM   #8
commonsenseman
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
White Bear Lake, Minnesota
Posts: 553
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


I don't know the how & why honey is safe to add without pasteurization, but I do know that it is. Many (most) mead-makers mix up meads with no heat whatsoever, I've done it many a time, with no infections.
__________________
"EC-1118 is a monster yeast. But it is also clean and quick. Like a humane serial killer."

1 Gal: Brandon O's-Graff
2 Gal: Big Ol' Barleywine
5 Gal: Graham's English Cider
5 Gal: Apfelwein
__________________________________________
Bottled: Traditional Wildflower Mead, Burnt Apple Braggot, Apfelwein, Big Ol' Braggot
Kegged: Wee Bit O' Honey

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 02:20 PM   #9
malevolent
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Boston, MA
Posts: 212
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Honey is very fermentable which is why after fermentation little honey flavor is left.
__________________
Primary: nothing :(
Secondary: nothing :(
Long Aging: Flanders Red (to be bottled this summer)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 02:33 PM   #10
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2010
Posts: 11,995
Liked 496 Times on 431 Posts


Honey, by its very nature (<15% water) is very hostile to nasties. The best honey has nothing more than a slight filtering to get the bee parts removed. Its also not heated above about 100-110f during processing.

Honey as excellent antibiotic properties. In ancient times it was used to dress wounds to prevent infection. It alao has the ability to remove infections (I've used it to do this with excellent results).
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump