Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Open to All!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Plate Chiller use with All-Grain
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-06-2011, 09:41 PM   #1
poacher27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: starkville, mississippi
Posts: 3
Default Plate Chiller use with All-Grain

I've just started all-grain brewing and ordered a plate chiller. I've been reading everything I can find about plate chillers (PC) vs. immersion chillers (IC), and it seems like most people use an IC first then run the wort from the pot through the PC to the fermentor. (And I follow some of the reasons--DMS, wort still too hot out of PC, etc.)

My question is do I really need to use an IC first then a PC, or can I run the wort straight from the kettle, through the PC, into the carboy? I understand that, ideally, I'd use both, but what kind of problems am I looking at just going through the PC? And how serious are these problems?

Just in case it makes a difference, I'm brewing with a converted keg with a steel mesh screen (bazooka screen) and fermenting in glass carboys.

Thanks in advance any help.


poacher27 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 09:51 PM   #2
Demon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Demon's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Willowbrook, IL
Posts: 962
Liked 112 Times on 71 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

That all depends on the speed of flow through the chiller and what your ground water temp is. For most people it's fine to go from kettle to chiller to fermentor.


Demon is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 09:51 PM   #3
bruin_ale
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Campbell, CA
Posts: 1,434
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts

Default

Who's using both IC and PC? I got rid of my IC and made it a HERMs coil when I got my plate chiller. I think most people who have plate chillers use only the plate chiller.
bruin_ale is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 09:52 PM   #4
GilaMinumBeer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
GilaMinumBeer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 51,902
Liked 5797 Times on 5052 Posts
Likes Given: 80

Default

Depends entirely on the efficiency of your chiller and the output temp of the wort (which is influenced by the input temp of teh chill water).

Ideally, you want to go from the 200+ degrees of the boiled wort to pitch temp (yeast specific) before filling the fermenter. If you can do that in a single pass, awesome. Depending on the year and winter temps this is highly likely to occur.

But, Summer temps may prove challenging for Ales and impossible for lagers without more contact inside the chiller.

So, get a pump and recirculate until the volume is cooled enough for a single pass to pitch temp and then off to the fermenter.
GilaMinumBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 09:57 PM   #5
weirdboy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,994
Liked 438 Times on 357 Posts
Likes Given: 63

Default

Personally I don't think it's about contact time in the chiller so much as flow rates (as previously mentioned) and cooling water temp.

In the summer you can't chill very well because the ground water is a lot warmer. Well, at least here it is.

So what I do is instead of connecting my "water in" line on the plate chiller directly to a hose or whatever, is that I fill up my MLT with ice water and use a submersible pump to push the water through the cooling side. I also dial back the flow rate on the wort side so my wort comes out pretty darn close to the cooling water temp.

In a single pass I am able to chill down to lager temps if necessary, but I also usually have to refill the water in my MLT before I get the fermenter filled up.
weirdboy is online now
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 10:24 PM   #6
poacher27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: starkville, mississippi
Posts: 3
Default

Thanks for the fast replies. I've already ordered a plate chiller, so I'll try it out once or twice before thinking about getting an IC too. I've thought about using the sump pump in the bucket trick--we'll see about that.
poacher27 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 10:27 PM   #7
Demon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Demon's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Willowbrook, IL
Posts: 962
Liked 112 Times on 71 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

You can also use an IC as a prechiller by putting it in a bucket with ice water and salt. It would then flow from faucet to IC/prechiller to plate chiller and out. This is what people in warmer climates with higher ground water temps commonly use.
Demon is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 10:44 PM   #8
Northcalais40
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: south of hardwick
Posts: 425
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Counterflow with ice water. It works quite well.
Northcalais40 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 01:47 AM   #9
Spreadhead
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Spreadhead's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 72
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I use my old IC as a pre-chiller for the warmer Houston ground water by putting it in an ice-water-filled small cooler.

My flow: Kettle -> March pump -> Plate Chiller -> Fermenter

Love it - boiling to pitching temp in less than 5 min, using only about 6 gallons of water, which I then use in my clean-up.
__________________
Spreadhead

Primary: nada, Tap 1: nada, Tap 2: nada, Tap 3: nada, Tap 4: breakfast stout
Next: robust porter
Spreadhead is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 04:46 AM   #10
GilaMinumBeer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
GilaMinumBeer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 51,902
Liked 5797 Times on 5052 Posts
Likes Given: 80

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weirdboy View Post
Personally I don't think it's about contact time in the chiller so much as flow rates (as previously mentioned) and cooling water temp.

In the summer you can't chill very well because the ground water is a lot warmer. Well, at least here it is.

So what I do is instead of connecting my "water in" line on the plate chiller directly to a hose or whatever, is that I fill up my MLT with ice water and use a submersible pump to push the water through the cooling side. I also dial back the flow rate on the wort side so my wort comes out pretty darn close to the cooling water temp.

In a single pass I am able to chill down to lager temps if necessary, but I also usually have to refill the water in my MLT before I get the fermenter filled up.
What? Slowing the flow rate is the same as increasing the contact time in the chiller.

As the temp differential (between hot wort and chill water) decreases so does the efficiency of the system. Increasing the contact time, aka slowing the flow rate, counteracts said differential efficiency drop.

As to chill water temps well, that is pretty basic. Can't get any colder than the chill water lest you bring some additional physics into play.


GilaMinumBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pump and plate chiller fittings barleywade All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 01-07-2011 07:49 PM
plate chiller failure LKHA All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 01-02-2011 06:11 PM
Chill-Out 30 Plate Chiller Mateo All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 05-04-2010 09:24 PM
Is straining necessary for Plate frame chiller? DustinHickey All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 19 04-24-2010 08:03 PM
40 plate chiller off of ebay quincannon All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 04-21-2010 12:12 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS