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Old 10-11-2010, 05:58 PM   #1
goybar
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Which would be better one 220v or two 110v elements?

I currently use a sp10 but electricity seems like a great way to go. Easier to brew inside durring the winter months.

would a 220v heat stick be a bad/dangerous thing?


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Old 10-11-2010, 06:08 PM   #2
Bowtiebrewery
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Here is the thing that really matters... You can do either however it really depends on what circuit you are using in your home and if it is GFCI protected and the correct amp breaker is on it.

If you go 220V you should be certain that your element draws under the maximum amount the circuit can handle... what wattage were you thinking?

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:34 PM   #3
goybar
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I haven't decided on the wattage yet. Still trying to see if it makes sense or not for me to do. I have plenty of open spaces in my electrical panel, so I would be installing whatever is required.

If I go the 220v route. I already have a few 220v outlets for power tools, but not GCFI.

If I go with a 110v heat stick I can probably use it in conjunction with my electric oven.

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 12:44 PM   #4
wilserbrewer
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Most make the 110 / 220 decision based upopn what they have available. The 'best' or most versatile set up for a new build is a large 220v, say 5500 or 4500 element controlled by a pid / ssr. With this the wattage is variable and can be dialed to what you want / need. Running a 2000w 110v element at 100% is very easy and effective to do on a 20amp gfi outlet, but it is really an easy (fast and dirty) alternative. Really depends on how sophisticated you want to go w/ the build, both in time and $$.

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 06:10 PM   #5
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True - The other consideration is money. A 50 amp GFCI breaker can cost $100. You can get a 20 amp GFCI outlet for $5, and the 2kw elements can be had for less than $15 each.


I don't think there's anything wrong with a 240v heat stick. It's the same basic setup as 110, and no more risk - As in all the same risks apply...
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Old 10-12-2010, 06:30 PM   #6
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240 is better. For lots of obvious reasons.

Cheaper, don't know, but you didn't ask.
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Old 09-04-2014, 02:01 AM   #7
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Obvious reasons?? Unless you regularly brew more than 10 gallon batches a 120v element will work just fine, doesn't sound as cool tho.

 
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Old 09-04-2014, 01:13 PM   #8
Minbari
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
240 is better. For lots of obvious reasons.

Cheaper, don't know, but you didn't ask.
what are those obvious reasons?

wattage is what the heats water, not voltage. only advantage 240 has is that it consumes less current, makes SSRs cheaper.(by about $5) but in the end, goals are the same.

also, it is not cheaper from an electrical perspective either. the meter on your house measures kWh, so weather it is 5kw 120v or 5kw 240v, the wattage is exactly the same.

 
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Old 09-04-2014, 01:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlkWater_brewer View Post
Obvious reasons?? Unless you regularly brew more than 10 gallon batches a 120v element will work just fine, doesn't sound as cool tho.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minbari View Post
what are those obvious reasons?

wattage is what the heats water, not voltage. only advantage 240 has is that it consumes less current, makes SSRs cheaper.(by about $5) but in the end, goals are the same.

also, it is not cheaper from an electrical perspective either. the meter on your house measures kWh, so weather it is 5kw 120v or 5kw 240v, the wattage is exactly the same.
Hey that comment was from 4 years ago. I must direct you to the Statute of Limitations on old nonsensical comments. I'm not sure what I was thinking then. But I'll just throw this out anyway:
  • 240V uses 1/4th the current to achieve the same wattage at the element. That's smaller gauge wire.
  • 240V is the only way to get the power to boil large batches. I do large batches, and usually 2 or 3 in a row. Waiting for water to heat can be the slowest part of the brew day.
  • Your system will work in Europe! (maybe)

That's all I got. I don't know what else I could have been thinking (drinking?) when I wrote that.
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Old 09-04-2014, 01:58 PM   #10
Minbari
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lol, didnt see the date. just saw the comment above.................gotta love necro-posting.

 
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