Great Western Superior Pilsner Malt - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Great Western Superior Pilsner Malt
Sign-up To NEW HBT Article Newsletter - Brewing Articles Direct To You!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-15-2010, 03:25 AM   #1
Pleepleus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Portland
Posts: 60
Likes Given: 1

Default Great Western Superior Pilsner Malt

So I just left the brewshop with a bag of Great Western Superior Pilsner Malt. Now I am having second thoughts.... Is this the type of pilsner malt I want? I am just now getting into lagers as I have temp control. I also do a fair amount of Belgians, which generally ask for "Continental Pilsner" in the recipe. Is this a comparable product??


Pleepleus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 01:35 AM   #2
oceanselv
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Posts: 471
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

It is a similar product. However the soil conditions the grain grows in does have an effect on the taste. The earthiness of Maris Otter is a prime example. Using a GW pilsner in a recipe calling for a continental pilsner may result in a slight taste difference. I however wouldn't worry to much about it; just brew a batch and see if you are happy with the taste.


__________________
Das Leben is zu kurz um schiess Bier zu trinken
oceanselv is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 08:11 AM   #3
Pleepleus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Portland
Posts: 60
Likes Given: 1

Default

Thanks for the reassurance, as that is basically what I was looking for! I think I may try another bag of Weyerman's Pils and try a couple of recipes split between each malt to taste the difference.
Pleepleus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2015, 04:36 AM   #4
sslater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Pleepleus - how did it end up working out for you, with North American Pilsner malt? As good as European in your estimation...?
sslater is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2015, 05:29 AM   #5
gbx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 757
Liked 120 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I've been on a yellow beer kick for the last couple years and have gone through several sacks of pilsner malt brewing nothing but german pilsners, cream ales and hefeweizens. Of the domestic pilsner malts I've tried, the GW stuff is fine. I liked the Canada Malting Company pilsner the best. The Gambrinus is okay but really really messy (so much more trub than anything else I've ever brewed with). None of them are as good as the Weyermann stuff (very clean in the kettle, great efficiency, awesome sweat malty flavour) But the domestic is half the price and at worse its 80% as good (and I wouldn't say its not as good or worse, its just slightly different).
gbx is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 12:52 AM   #6
sslater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Thanks GBX.

Great Western is pretty cheap, and I've had good luck for pale ales and whatnot with their standard 2-row. Haven't brewed with anything else they make.

I've brewed lots of lagers over the past year and really like German & Czech Pilsner. Have always used either Weyermann's or Best Malz. Haven't brewed enough brews that were the same to compare and know for sure which of those two were best... If the domestic is pretty good but only 80% as good as the European, even if half price, it wouldn't be worth it to buy domestic for me...if you know what I mean? I would stick with German Malt... Maybe could get enough GW Pilsner malt to make one batch, I suppose... Or just get some grains to taste test side-by-side. (perhaps answering my own question).

If the domestic has certain advantageous qualities (it may), would be cool to know what they were... Make a European inspired but all domestic brew...

I've always bought grain from local home brew shop but because of cost - and also pain in the butt grinding 2 lbs. at a time at local shop - plan to buy my own grain and equipment. At this point, leaning towards a 15 lbs. grinder, and a bag of Best Malz pilsner malt and a bag of Great Western 2-Row Malt.
sslater is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 06:04 AM   #7
gbx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 757
Liked 120 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sslater View Post
If the domestic is pretty good but only 80% as good as the European, even if half price, it wouldn't be worth it to buy domestic for me...if you know what I mean? I would stick with German Malt... Maybe could get enough GW Pilsner malt to make one batch, I suppose... Or just get some grains to taste test side-by-side. (perhaps answering my own question).
I understand and i'm of the same school of thought. 3 of my last 4 bags of pilsner have been Weyermann bohemian pilsner. Its home-brew and the difference between a $8 grist and $16 is worth it to me. The one non-weyermann was a half bag of the canada malting and I did a cream ales, some hefes, a dunkel and a baltic porter. They were all fine and I wouldn't hesitate to buy another bag of it if the weyermann wasn't available.

A SMaSH is a great way to evaluate new malts, hops and yeast. My standard recipe for testing out new pilsner malt is a 5gal 1.044 with 2oz of hallertau at FW and 1oz at flameout, fermented with US05. Its cheap and drinkable within 3 weeks. I have no problem getting rid of a yellow lager like beer (even the wife and in laws will drink these experiments).
gbx is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 06:26 AM   #8
sudbuddy
Hang on, I had something for this
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
sudbuddy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 950
Liked 258 Times on 178 Posts
Likes Given: 204

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbx View Post
The Gambrinus is okay but really really messy (so much more trub than anything else I've ever brewed with).
Interesting, I haven't tried the Gambrinus Pils but I've noticed that with other malts. Is it just me or is every Continental malt super dusty? I mill a LOT of grain for people and I have noticed that the domestic stuff, especially Great Western, is pretty clean. Yet when I mill anything from over the pond the resulting dust cloud chokes me out and I have to pause and then resume milling after a lengthy coughing fit. Perhaps it is because I mill about 400 lbs a day, but I'm thinking the European malts are extra dusty. Has anyone else noticed this? I can't speak to the trub, but dang that dust is killing me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sslater View Post
I've always bought grain from local home brew shop but because of cost
Right on bro! Keep supporting local businesses and your fellow brewers!
__________________
Support your Local Home Brew Shop!
sudbuddy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 06:27 AM   #9
Magnus314
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Wellington, FL
Posts: 291
Liked 55 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

Weyermann is my favorite, but the GW is really good. I usually add some rice or corn for "American Lager".

A decoction would change things... Weyermann gets that distinct German/Dutch "twangy" malt flavor, GW just gets "maltier"... which is good.
Magnus314 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 05:48 PM   #10
gbx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 757
Liked 120 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sudbuddy View Post
Interesting, I haven't tried the Gambrinus Pils but I've noticed that with other malts. Is it just me or is every Continental malt super dusty? I mill a LOT of grain for people and I have noticed that the domestic stuff, especially Great Western, is pretty clean. Yet when I mill anything from over the pond the resulting dust cloud chokes me out and I have to pause and then resume milling after a lengthy coughing fit. Perhaps it is because I mill about 400 lbs a day, but I'm thinking the European malts are extra dusty. Has anyone else noticed this? I can't speak to the trub, but dang that dust is killing me!



Right on bro! Keep supporting local businesses and your fellow brewers!

Maybe the european stuff is drier? That would also explain the slightly improved efficiency too.

If you are grinding that much daily you probably should wear a mask, grain dust is not a good thing to inhale on a regular basis. its not as bad as a lot of things you can breath but there is a condition known as "farmer lung" (don't google "grain dust exposure" if you are hypochondriac like myself)

And yes support your local homebrew shop. grain is something you want to taste before buying and yeast really needs to be purchased locally so it doesn't suffer the abuse of home ups delivery


gbx is offline
sudbuddy Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
American Pilsner malt VS Continental Pilsner malt maida7 Recipes/Ingredients 9 04-01-2010 06:49 PM
For Sale - Great Western Malt $.80/Lb Steelers77 For Sale 0 02-02-2010 04:10 PM
Superior Pilsen Malt Emian All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 11-21-2009 08:07 AM
Great Western crystal malt (15 degrees L) dpt222 Recipes/Ingredients 4 03-23-2008 08:45 AM
Great Western Malt AGBrewer Recipes/Ingredients 3 10-03-2007 05:47 PM


Forum Jump