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Old 08-10-2009, 07:03 PM   #1
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One of the bestest comfort foods evar. Was one of my favorite things mom used to cook. And since everybody has a 1/2 steer in their freezer now , let's talk pot roast.

I made probably my best one over the weekend. I finally realized that my crock pot was just too hot even on the lowest setting. This time I seasoned the 3# boneless chuck roast with kosher salt, browned the chuck roast and then lightly seasoned it Lawry's Seasoned Salt. In the crock pot I put 1 pkg. baby carrots, 2 stalks celery in chunks, 1/2 med onion in large chunks, 1/4 cup water, 1 tsp. beef base, 1/4 tsp. white pepper, and a few shakes Worcestershire. Then I placed the browned/seasoned chuck roast on top. I let it go on LOW for 6 hours...turned it OFF for 2 hours...then back ON (low) for 3 hours...then OFF for 1 hour. It was as perfect as I've made it.

I also decided that I prefer cooking the potatos (small red/creamers) seperately.

Why is it better the next day? I have heard that at least part of it is because when we slow cook something we break down the collagen in the meat. The collagen breaks down to gelatin. And things are kind of mushy at that point. But if we cool it and let that gelatin set...then it takes more heat to get it mushy again than it took to break down the collagen in the first place. So the meat stays fork-tender but yet is less mushy than it was when first cooked. Sounds plausible I guess...but when I eat leftover pot roast I never think; "This is better because it's less mushy than it was a day ago". It's just better.

Some folks eat pot roast as a stew (in a bowl with lots of the liquid) while others eat it pretty much dry...probably lots of variations. I like it more like a stew...I want at least some of that wonderful liquid.

Also, if you buy the chuck roast bone-in...allegedly you want a roast with longest blade bone as possible. Or so says Alton Brown. The roast with the longest blade bone is from the 'good end' of the chuck/shoulder primal. I just get the boneless...which is prob from the 'bad end' of the primal but whatever.

Who loves pot roast?


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Old 08-15-2009, 02:50 PM   #2
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I love pot roast. Once the weather cools down it typically becomes our sunday meal even if it's just me and the wife. I guess it falls on tradition because ever since I was a baby we would always go to my grandma's house every sunday with the rest of the family and eat roast.

I loved my grandma's roast so much I spent a lot of time scouring ebay and garage sales trying to find the exact stainless steel electric skillet she used to use. I finally found one. It's probably 40 years old but it's the single best piece of cooking equipment I have.

Anyway, I also use boneless and braise the roast in the skillet. I also brown it up good on both sides first and then soften an onion in the oil before starting the braise. After a few hours it's ready and then I use all the good brown bits in the pan to make some awesome gravy. I also cook the potatoes separately.

Wow, now my mouth is watering. Good thing I have a roast in the fridge right now. Might have to make it tonight instead of tomorrow



 
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:01 PM   #3
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I made a pot roast this weekend, a chuck arm roast to be precise, and it was awesome. I start by cutting the roast into 3-4 parts to make it easier to move. Then I throw copious amounts of kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper on both sides of each piece and with a little olive oil in the bottom of our heaviest SS pan I brown each. Unfortunately we do not have a cast iron Dutch oven so I have to brown the meat in one pan and roast it in another so once all the browning is done and all the pieces are in the roaster I add some water to the pan I browned it in and scrape up all the good stuff. This water plus a bit more gets poured into the roaster. Then I add some dried thyme, 3-4 bay leaves and any vegetables we want to cook with the meat to the roaster. The whole thing gets covered and goes into the oven at 275 for at least 4 hours or so, if not longer. When it’s done the meat and veggies get pulled out and all the liquid in the pan goes into a sauce pan and brought to a boil. I take some flour and cold water and mix it up and once the liquid has come to a good boil I pour in enough of the flour mixture to thicken it up, add salt and pepper to taste and you’ve got an awesome gravy.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:39 PM   #4
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Has anyone ever tried the Alton Brown pot roast? I have been wanting to make it for a while now but just never have.
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:39 PM   #5
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Why are we on a beer forum and you people are using water in your roast? Seriously drop the water and use some beer the results will astound you
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:50 PM   #6
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Love it!! I've tried the Alton Brown version (seared in cast iron, wrapped in foil with aromatic vegetables, and slow roasted). Perfect. Lately, though, I've been using a 7-bone roast, braising in the oven with vegetables, and flipping every 30 minutes. On the last few flips the thing is basically falling apart. No one in my house likes onion chunks, so after the meat comes out, I skim the fat off the liquid and puree everything. Wonderful "gravy."

I'll have to try the braise with homebrew next time. Duh.

 
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:54 PM   #7
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Why are we on a beer forum and you people are using water in your roast? Seriously drop the water and use some beer the results will astound you
The only problem is that I never have any beer that is good for cooking. Most of it is really hoppy.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:11 PM   #8
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I'm thinking super hoppy beer (depending on the hops) could/would work in a few instances:

Citrusy hops: Seafood/poultry
Earthy: beef/stew
Herbal/grassy: anything you can highlight an herbal note in, possibly a splash in pasta sauce instead of wine or even going back to the stew.

Personally I plan on trying to steam some shrimp with a super citrusy IIPA here soon.

edit: As another example of using beer that MIGHT not sound quite right for the dish, I used some oak barrel stout in some chili last night. Added an incredible smokiness and depth to the flavor that is making my mouth water just thinking about the leftovers.
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Old 08-25-2009, 10:24 PM   #9
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I have found that cooking with hoppy beers you lose any of the nuances of the individual hop profiles and and just becomes an over astringent bitter flavor.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:16 AM   #10
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Last time i made some roast i added a little mead (joe's quick grape mead)..
the result was incredible.. i will definately repeat it.

it added nicely to both the aroma and the flavor



 
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