Safale s-04 alc. tolerance - Home Brew Forums

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Old 02-28-2009, 06:49 PM   #1
Keepthedrive
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Hi all,
Just started fermenting a mock-ish export 80 about 3 days ago. I only have till wednesday before I leave for spring break, and have used safale 04 once before with awesome results. but I wanted a big beer this time. So I used 8lbs briess gold liquid extract, and 2lbs northwestern extra light dry. The alc. should be around 8%, though I dont have any sort of software to calculate what it should be, and I was in such a rush that I didnt take a gravity reading.

The thing Im nervous about is if this is too much extract for safale s04? Ive read that it can slowly get up to 8.5% if you give it time, which I can do if necessary. But I was thinking that if it stops fermenting soon, and I wanted to be on the safe side, that I could transfer to carboy, then pitch a danstar nottingham in with it to make sure that all the malts are eaten up. The safale would have given a nice flavor profile for the majority of the sugars, and the nottingham would tag team in to just finish up whats left, and not really give any flavors at all because thats just the profile of that yeast.

Anyone think that itll get to 8% on its own, or if my extra pitching of the nottingham sounds safe/logical?

Other suggestions?

thanks for all your help,
tb

 
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Old 02-28-2009, 07:39 PM   #2
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For a beer that big, leave it in the primary over your Spring Break, and check it when you get back. When I plug those ingredients into BeerSmith, I get 7.3% abv, which the S-04 should handle fine, but you need to give the yeast time to work and clean up after themselves anyway.
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Old 03-01-2009, 12:01 AM   #3
g_rath
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FYI BeerSmith is a free download for 20 days and only $20 to buy. Its great for all the calculations you want to do.
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:13 AM   #4
Keepthedrive
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should I even transfer to the carboy before I leave, or just let it be? ill be back the 15th, so thats 2.5 weeks total ferment. Already tnit, it has slowed way down on the bubbling through the airlock.

I have a feeling its gonna have a nice flavor, my basement is a pretty consistent 64 degrees, which is probably contributing to the slowing of the fermenting.

btw, what is s-04 capable of attenuating to? Provided you throw in the directed yeast nutrient, 1 T per gallon?, can it go higher?

 
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Old 03-01-2009, 08:52 AM   #5
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2.5 weeks in the primary is no issue. That beer is big enough that the extra time will do it good anyway.

Today I moved an ESB made with S-04 to secondary. Without a starter (pitched dry) or yeast nutrient, it dropped from 1.054 to 1.013 in 7 days at 66 F ambient (probably a little warmer in the carboy). That was one of the best hydro samples I've had in a long time, too.

As far as beersmith goes, I can't really recommend it enough. I'm really happy with it; as an extract brewer, it was the first software I found that could properly account for late malt adds and that helps out in recipe creation/conversion.
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Old 03-01-2009, 09:08 AM   #6
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You can leave a beer in the primary for months as well as it is well sealed (airlock) and the temp is not to high. Standard fermentation temps will be OK.

I haven't used a secondary for 3 years. A secondary is primarily for clearing.

Leave it in the primary but make sure it isn't going to be in an area where the temps drop to much as that can slow or stop fermentation (conversely you don't want it to warm either).
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Old 03-01-2009, 12:03 PM   #7
brewt00l
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Some of the older commercial descriptions of S04 list it as "A dry ale yeast derived from the Whitbread strain." They Wyeast descriptions for Whitbread does fall right in line with what I've seen from S04:

Wyeast Laboratories. Whitbread Aleâ„¢ 1099
YEAST STRAIN: 1099 | Whitbread Ale™
A mildly malty and slightly fruity fermentation profile; not as tart and dry as 1098 and much more flocculent. Clears well without filtration. Low fermentation temperatures will produce a clean finish with a very low ester profile.

Origin:
Flocculation: High
Attenuation: 68-72%
Temperature Range: 64-75F, 18-24C
Alcohol Tolerance: 10% ABV

 
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Old 03-02-2009, 05:54 AM   #8
Keepthedrive
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cool,
well thanks for all the info guys...and girls if there happen to be any here...but one last question. If I aerate it with a big sterilized spoon before I leave, just a couple good plunges down, will that kick the yeast back into action for a little more?

My brother had told me to do this once before because he was afraid that the temp I was fermenting at this one particular time would create some butterscotch flavors. he told me that it would help the yeast start up again for a little, and also to eat up any butterscotch flavors that might be present. Im not worried about off flavors, like the bubblegum everyone seems to get from this yeast, but I do want to make sure that this yeast gets as much out of those malts as possible. If the week and a half that im gone is enough for the yeast to eat all that it can, then screw it. is it worth it?

again,
thanks everyone ur all awesome

 
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Old 03-02-2009, 11:16 AM   #9
brewt00l
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keepthedrive View Post
If I aerate it with a big sterilized spoon before I leave, just a couple good plunges down, will that kick the yeast back into action for a little more?
You're already well into fermentation...it's a pretty fast yeast to begin with so I wouldn't go mucking around and try to introduce any oxygen. Take a hydro reading and then another before you leave to see where it is. Have you taken any gravity readings to see where it's at?

 
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Old 03-02-2009, 05:20 PM   #10
Keepthedrive
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no, the day of brewing i was in a hurry to get to the airport and then to work, so I didnt take a reading

 
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