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Old 01-28-2009, 07:52 PM   #11
nealf
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmckee56 View Post
Could this just be very green beer that requires many months to age, softened and mellow out?
This is my guess... A Russian Imperial definitely needs a lot of time to mellow out. Your temp might have been a bit on the high side; but, I think it will mellow out into an excellent beer.

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Old 01-28-2009, 09:50 PM   #12
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Russian Imperial is a stout that should have some diacetyl and other yeast flavors- i'd say, depending on what yeast strain you used, that 70 degrees is actually a pretty good temp for this beer

did you do a diacetyl rest? if you used an english yeast strain you probably need one

 
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Old 01-29-2009, 12:14 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Whisler85 View Post
did you do a diacetyl rest? if you used an english yeast strain you probably need one
Wish I knew what this actually was, I am too new at home brewing as this was only like my 6th or 7th kit. I do a lot of reading but do not remember reading much about Diacetyl Rest. Can you provide some insight on this? It is possible I did it, but only without knowledge of doing so.

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Old 01-29-2009, 12:21 AM   #14
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A diacetyl rest is not necessary for this style of beer. Diacetyl rests are typically only done with lagers.

A diacetyl rest involves keeping the beer at a specific temperature range for a set period of time. I'd pretty much guarantee that you didn't do one, or you'd remember it.
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Old 01-29-2009, 12:33 AM   #15
bmckee56
 
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No, I guess not, but the Stout was lowered by a few degrees and allowed to finish in the secondary at temperatures that did not fluctuate more than a degree or two. It was kegged then placed in the garage where the temperature did drop but never reached 32 degrees.

Since my OP, I have moved the Stout to my cold cellar which has a fairly consistent temperature overall.

So can anyone provide a time line on how long it may require for aging before I actually begin drinking this batch. Also, should the Stout be kept at a certain pressure during the aging process?

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Old 01-29-2009, 06:07 AM   #16
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Some diacetyl is OK in a beer like this. As noted above it is a flaw in most lagers. In most English beers it is acceptable (and expected). When you say your primary fermentation was 70F did you maintain it at 70F or just pitch it at 70F? The reason I ask is because fermentation is an exothermic reaction and will heat your fermentor up. In the case of a big beer like a RIS it can be 8-10F higher then ambient unless you have some way to cool it off.

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Old 01-30-2009, 01:10 PM   #17
bmckee56
 
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I pitched at 70, maintained at 70 for a few days then dropped it a few degrees (ambient). I do not think the ambient temperature ever rose above 68 degrees in the fermentation area.

I have decided it wold be best to put this brew away for a few months and allow it to age. My concern now is: What pressure should I maintain in the keg, during this period of time?

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Old 01-30-2009, 02:51 PM   #18
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Storing it in your basement isolated from any furnace or other heat source is the best place to store a beer for long term aging. It sounds like this beer is pretty young so it just needs some time. My imperial stouts did not get bottled until they were 2 months old. At that point they were pretty good but continued to improve for over a year. I'd say give it 3 months or so before sampling again. It should be pretty good by that point.

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Old 08-01-2009, 05:19 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Trub? View Post
Some diacetyl is OK in a beer like this. As noted above it is a flaw in most lagers. In most English beers it is acceptable (and expected). When you say your primary fermentation was 70F did you maintain it at 70F or just pitch it at 70F? The reason I ask is because fermentation is an exothermic reaction and will heat your fermentor up. In the case of a big beer like a RIS it can be 8-10F higher then ambient unless you have some way to cool it off.

GT
Basement temperature is typically maintained at 68 degrees. I can get it colder, but then the upstairs is like a meat locker. I don't have room for a conditioning closet or fermenting chamber, so I do with what I have.

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