Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Soda Making > Sassafras/sarsaparilla root beer recipe?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-14-2013, 01:28 PM   #91
Crazy8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St. Francis, Minnesota
Posts: 106
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithww View Post
The real way to determine the sugar used would be to take a specific gravity before and after carbonation. As far as the yeast flavor is concerned I thought most people used champaign yeast which is pretty clean. I use different yeasts to get me different flavor profiles in beer, mead, or wine with soda I thought the point was to have a clean flavor.
This is exactly what I use. When I was first starting I came across recipes that were saying to just use yeast you find in the grocery store. Man was that a bad idea. I cant stand the taste of beer and I was getting those types of flavors from some of the different types of yeast I was using. Then a smart man at my local brew shop suggested the Champagne yeast due to its fine bubbles and really clean flavor. He also said "this is what most people use for when doing root beer." I haven't used anything else since then.
__________________
Crazy8 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-14-2013, 05:46 PM   #92
netsecgeek
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 13
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithww View Post
The real way to determine the sugar used would be to take a specific gravity before and after carbonation. As far as the yeast flavor is concerned I thought most people used champaign yeast which is pretty clean. I use different yeasts to get me different flavor profiles in beer, mead, or wine with soda I thought the point was to have a clean flavor.
I will take gravity readings and post them here when I make my batch. I still have to order the roots.

I'll be using dried champagne yeast as well and temp controlling the batch at like 60F to keep it clean. Even given that, I still think the fermentation process will impart a flavor/mouthfeel you cannot get otherwise.
__________________
netsecgeek is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-08-2013, 10:13 AM   #93
saramc
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: suburb of Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,743
Liked 146 Times on 132 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

On the 'old feet' smell....not all Champagne yeast are the same. You have Red Star Champagne, then many choose EC-1118. And I have never been pleased with either in sodamaking. My personal choice is Premier Cuvee, it seems to be my fallback yeast for soda making. It is clean and crisp, not harsh.

Stumbled across a nice yeast chart, http://www.homebrewery.com/wine/wine-yeast-dry.shtml

Masterjuggler--has your water source been the same for each 'stinky feet' batch? And which yeast specifically? Temperature?

__________________

Motto: quel che sara sara

saramc is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-08-2013, 11:31 PM   #94
Masterjuggler
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Edison, NJ
Posts: 29
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Honestly I haven't made any root beer since I posted last.

I got whatever strain this yeast is.

I'm using water from the filter by my sink, every time. I'm not sure what you mean by temperature.

__________________
Masterjuggler is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2013, 03:33 AM   #95
rednoise
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2
Likes Given: 1

Default

would there be a way to filter the yeast after it's been carbonated well enough, and to preserve the carbonation? say, it was fermenting in a carboy and you wanted to bottle it.

__________________
rednoise is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2013, 07:01 PM   #96
Crazy8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St. Francis, Minnesota
Posts: 106
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts

Default

I myself have never tried it and not sure why you would want to do it, but if your looking at stopping the fermentation when you reach the level of carbonation you want, simply pasteurizing will do that. I guess my thought is that if you carb it, then open the carboy to bottle it you will lose some carbonation upon opening the carboy, in addition to more when you filter out the yeast and pour into bottles. By the time all is said and done, you will likely end up with a relatively flat beverage. You might be thinking "well ill carb past what I want so that after the process I may end up at the level I do want." Well the problem with that is we don't know what the percentage of carbonation will be lost during the process but you also risk the chance of turning your carboy into a bomb. I have been there and done that and that is not a pleasant sound or mess to clean up at 3am when you're dead asleep. Without anyway of monitoring the psi inside the carboy and knowing what psi is the "breaking point" of the carboy, it just doesn't seem like a good or feasible thing to do.

__________________
Crazy8 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2013, 09:51 PM   #97
rednoise
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy8 View Post
I myself have never tried it and not sure why you would want to do it, but if your looking at stopping the fermentation when you reach the level of carbonation you want, simply pasteurizing will do that. I guess my thought is that if you carb it, then open the carboy to bottle it you will lose some carbonation upon opening the carboy, in addition to more when you filter out the yeast and pour into bottles. By the time all is said and done, you will likely end up with a relatively flat beverage. You might be thinking "well ill carb past what I want so that after the process I may end up at the level I do want." Well the problem with that is we don't know what the percentage of carbonation will be lost during the process but you also risk the chance of turning your carboy into a bomb. I have been there and done that and that is not a pleasant sound or mess to clean up at 3am when you're dead asleep. Without anyway of monitoring the psi inside the carboy and knowing what psi is the "breaking point" of the carboy, it just doesn't seem like a good or feasible thing to do.
Thanks for the explanation! The pasteurizing is what I needed to know.
__________________
rednoise is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-24-2013, 08:14 PM   #98
Crazy8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St. Francis, Minnesota
Posts: 106
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts

Default

* Heat up a stock pot of water to 190 degrees.
* When 190 is reached then turn the heat off.
* Add bottles of root beer to the pot but do not crowd to much. I do about 3-4 bottles at a time.
* Put lid on pot and let sit for 10 minutes.
* Carefully remove bottles and let cool.
- Repeat process until all bottles have been done.
* Once cooled, place in fridge for enjoyment whenever you feel you need a delicious carbonated non exploding beverage.
Hope this helps.

__________________
Crazy8 is offline
rednoise Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-26-2014, 01:58 PM   #99
Ttownbrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Ttownbrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Thornton, CO
Posts: 147
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default Sassafras/sarsaparilla root beer recipe?

.

__________________
Ttownbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2014, 01:58 AM   #100
Masterjuggler
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Edison, NJ
Posts: 29
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I finally got around to making another batch after managing to make enough room in the fridge. I got the pbw cleaner and sanitized with starsan, and even used bottled water instead of filtered tap water. I swear, there is no possible way anything unsanitized touched my root beer to infect the yeast. Still though, it smells and tastes like feet.

So now I'm positive it has something to do with my ingredients. I doubt my yeast is bad, as it has never even left the fridge. I forgot to cut back on the sarsaparilla this time, but I'm pretty sure that isn't it (it has no funky smell). My raisins did expire 4 years ago, but they are just dried fruit, and shouldn't go bad, as far as I know. My nutmeg is ground, I'm not sure if you use whole nutmeg. None of my ingredients smell like the feet smell I'm getting from the root beer.

I can try using active dry yeast next time, see if the feet smell goes away and is replaced by a yeast taste. I also have more champaign yeast that is still in unopened packets, and hasn't left the freezer since I got it.

Besides the yeast and the nutmeg (and possibly raisins?), I can't think of anything else that would be causing this smell and taste. I could try a different recipe? I'm really at a loss.

One thing to note though, is that the flavor doesn't taste "disastrous". It tastes more like some ingredient didn't work out right, if you know what I mean. I could be completely wrong here, but this is just an observation.

__________________
Masterjuggler is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dried Sassafras Bark vs Sassafras Root??? duganderson Soda Making 7 02-03-2013 09:41 PM
Root beer brewing recipe without sassafras virtualpaul Soda Making 7 08-29-2012 02:59 AM
Sassafras Leaves in Root Beer foxandbear Soda Making 2 05-28-2012 09:24 PM
Sassafras root beer WoolyBooger Soda Making 5 05-14-2012 01:28 AM
Does Sassafras root beer make mouth numb??? duganderson Soda Making 1 05-04-2010 02:59 AM