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Old 04-30-2010, 06:29 PM   #1
turkstreetales
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Default Keg carbonation questions

I kegged my first brew a 3 weeks ago naturally carbonating it with sugar. I tested it out last night and it was barely carbonated - saw maybe a few bubbles. I think this was due to improper sealing when I first put the beer in the keg.

So, after tasting the flat beer, I resealed the keg at 30psi - was this the right move? I didn't release the gas - was I supposed to? Will this help the carbonation process?

Also, when I was trying to get a sample, I was getting a ton of foam. I started at 5psi and moved up between 8 and 12 - any recommendations here?

New to the kegging game so any feedback would be really helpful.

Thanks

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Old 04-30-2010, 06:39 PM   #2
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If the keg wasn't sealed properly, you won't see much carbonation. The temperature also really affects the way your beer carbs up, so make sure it's in a warmer area while carbing.

Resealing the keg at 30psi is perfect. That's exactly how I do it. Give it that pressure until you hear the top seat in place and then you can stop the flow of gas. It will not contribute much to any carbonation in your beer. To carbonate it, you would need continuous flow of CO2.

The foam issue could be caused by a number of things. First, make sure that you are opening up the tap quickly and fully. If you *****foot with pouring the beer, you'll always see a ton of foam. Also, try to keep the PSI down as low as possible when serving to reduce the amount of foam when pouring.

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Old 04-30-2010, 06:39 PM   #3
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When you first kegged the beer you should always pressurize with gas. Not only that you want to pull the ring a few times to purge any oxygen. By pressurizing you will get a proper seal.

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Old 04-30-2010, 06:39 PM   #4
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Funny, I have gone through the exact same thing. I carbonated naturally and got plenty of CO2 in the keg, but there just wasn't any in solution after 3 weeks. Last night I set my regulator at 30psi and today I plan on checking it out again to see if that helped. Wish I had an answer for you now, but if my beer is any different tonight, I'll let you know!

Question for you: how long have you been chilling your keg? I know chilling will help the CO2 absorb into the beer. I had only been chilling for a few days when I tested mine.

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Old 04-30-2010, 06:48 PM   #5
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RE: rsmith: when I pressurized it at 30 psi last night, I heard the top seal.

To carbonate it, you would need continuous flow of CO2.- Should I keep the tank connected and flowing until I get carbonation?

Also, before I taste-test the beer again, should I pull the O-ring to release any oxygen or does that not matter?

RE: Brookdale: crazy, definitely keep me posted on what you find. I currently have it in my basement at about 67 degrees. I am planning to move it to my fridge tonight to chill it.

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Old 04-30-2010, 09:08 PM   #6
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Here's the deal - if your keg wasn't sealed when you primed the beer, almost all that CO2 escaped. Now that it is properly sealed, you either need to keep it cold and hooked up to the CO2 tank to carb it or you need to add more priming sugar and keep it at room temp. Simply sealing it at 30psi and disconnecting the gas won't carb your beer.

Now, let's take the hypothetical situation where your keg was sealed properly and your beer was carbonated properly by adding the priming sugar - I'm working off theory here, as I haven't tried this yet. What you probably want to do is hook it up to the gas but have the regulator down to 0 psi. It should show the pressure that exists in the keg from your priming. As the keg cools, I imagine the pressure will drop. If it starts to drop below the appropriate force carbing pressure, increase the gas to compensate. If you used the appropriate amount of priming sugar, it should drop down pretty close to the force carb pressure, I believe.

After it has been cooling for a couple days, set the regulator for serving pressure and pull the pressure release valve to relieve extra pressure. Then, give it a taste!

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Old 04-30-2010, 09:25 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojotele View Post
Here's the deal - if your keg wasn't sealed when you primed the beer, almost all that CO2 escaped. Now that it is properly sealed, you either need to keep it cold and hooked up to the CO2 tank to carb it or you need to add more priming sugar and keep it at room temp. Simply sealing it at 30psi and disconnecting the gas won't carb your beer.

Now, let's take the hypothetical situation where your keg was sealed properly and your beer was carbonated properly by adding the priming sugar - I'm working off theory here, as I haven't tried this yet. What you probably want to do is hook it up to the gas but have the regulator down to 0 psi. It should show the pressure that exists in the keg from your priming. As the keg cools, I imagine the pressure will drop. If it starts to drop below the appropriate force carbing pressure, increase the gas to compensate. If you used the appropriate amount of priming sugar, it should drop down pretty close to the force carb pressure, I believe.

After it has been cooling for a couple days, set the regulator for serving pressure and pull the pressure release valve to relieve extra pressure. Then, give it a taste!
that is such a simple solution that I never thought of it. You are my new hero.
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkstreetales View Post
RE: Brookdale: crazy, definitely keep me posted on what you find. I currently have it in my basement at about 67 degrees. I am planning to move it to my fridge tonight to chill it.
I tasted mine when I got home and it was definitely carbonated more than it had been. I'm thinking leaving it one more day at 30psi should make it about perfect!
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
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After it has been cooling for a couple days, set the regulator for serving pressure and pull the pressure release valve to relieve extra pressure. Then, give it a taste!
I am new to this too... what exactly is serving pressure? ( I know temp is a factor here too) but I carbed at 30 PSI, then reduced my pressure to 10. Do I serve at 10 or serve at less, my beer is pouring foamy as hell right now but it has only been a couple days at 10 PSI.
I have since brought my pressure down to 5 to see if I can pour a glass tomorrow.
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Old 05-03-2010, 02:51 PM   #10
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I am new to this too... what exactly is serving pressure? ( I know temp is a factor here too) but I carbed at 30 PSI, then reduced my pressure to 10. Do I serve at 10 or serve at less, my beer is pouring foamy as hell right now but it has only been a couple days at 10 PSI.
I have since brought my pressure down to 5 to see if I can pour a glass tomorrow.
I think it depends on a few variables like line length, temperature, etc. So the proper answer is "whatever works for you." But, 5 psi seems to be work well for a lot of peoples.

If it doesn't foam but comes out super slow, try 7 psi.
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