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Old 12-06-2012, 12:22 AM   #31
Frogmanx82
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Originally Posted by zeg View Post
However, on the last couple beers I've made I have done a week or more of crashing, and there is virtually no bottle trub. Leaving it behind means you don't have to worry about kicking it up if you don't handle your bottle gently before pouring.
If it's noticeably less trub in the bottle than I would definitely consider doing a cold crash on the secondary.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:22 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Gameface

If you have the ability to cold crash I would do it every time.
Question. I heard it mentioned that cold crashing is more beneficial with yeast that has low flocculation. I am currently fermenting a brown ale with wyeast 1335 that supposedly has high flocculation. I was thinking of cold crashing it after fermentation finishes instead of secondary fermentation. Would I still achieve similar benefit in terms of clarity?
Sorry to hijack a thread but it seems to be right on topic!
Thanks,
Pat.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:38 PM   #33
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Question. I heard it mentioned that cold crashing is more beneficial with yeast that has low flocculation. I am currently fermenting a brown ale with wyeast 1335 that supposedly has high flocculation. I was thinking of cold crashing it after fermentation finishes instead of secondary fermentation. Would I still achieve similar benefit in terms of clarity?
Sorry to hijack a thread but it seems to be right on topic!
Thanks,
Pat.
It is. Your particular beer should still be clear of visible yeast particles without cold crashing, assuming 2-4 weeks in the primary. As long as you avoid agitating the trub in the fermenter, the gains you would get from cold crashing would be minimal at best. And a Secondary is not necessary for a standard brown ale.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:58 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by bobbrews

It is. Your particular beer should still be clear of visible yeast particles without cold crashing, assuming 2-4 weeks in the primary. As long as you avoid agitating the trub in the fermenter, the gains you would get from cold crashing would be minimal at best. And a Secondary is not necessary for a standard brown ale.
OK, thanks much. I'll leave it in the fermenter at least 2 weeks then.
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:35 PM   #35
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OK, thanks much. I'll leave it in the fermenter at least 2 weeks then.
Just to expand on the topic a little more, pros and cons. Your typical beer that benefits from some age like anything on the malty side would be fine in the fermenter for a couple extra weeks to clear but if you follow this same method for Anything hoppy you will be hard pressed to come out with anything with a big popping hop aroma like the commercial beers. For hoppy beers especially I am a huge proponent of cold crashing. I actually just did a Rye IPA where I dry hopped two ounces in the primary on day 4, the beer was at 1.015 and it finished at 1.011 so it was close to done. Then on day 8 I cold crashed for 8 hours, all the pellet hops pack to the bottle and I racked on to another 2 oz dry hops in a CO2 flushed vessel. 4 days later toss that in the fridge in the morning and rack to keg that night. I don't use hop bags and I dry hop with pellets and this would be damn near impossible to pull off with out cold crashing. It was the savior when I discovered it, I used to get so much hop crap in my package. Do it.


Brew it, keg it, drink it, repeat.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:14 PM   #36
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anything on the malty side would be fine in the fermenter for a couple extra weeks to clear but if you follow this same method for Anything hoppy you will be hard pressed to come out with anything with a big popping hop aroma like the commercial beers.
Disagreed. There are plenty of amazing IPAs that employ a 2-4 week total fermentation & conditioning time, followed by a 1-2 week dryhop. Yeast cleanup is important. Just because your beer is at target FG does not always mean it is complete flavorwise. Any issues you find with lack of hop aroma or flavor is probably due to a bad recipe or not using enough of the right hops at the right times.
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:04 PM   #37
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My understanding was that you could primary as long as you want, just add the dry hops a certain time before the END of your time. That is, work backward from the end of your timeline. Just don't add dry hops as soon as fermentation is complete or during an extended primary you will lose your aroma.

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Old 12-07-2012, 05:52 PM   #38
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Okay I was just sharing my recommendation. Buzz off jerks

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Old 12-07-2012, 05:53 PM   #39
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This is exactly why this forum frustrates me. Too many people that think they know it all, there is not one way to do it. Screw off if you think you have all the answers cuz you don't

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Old 12-07-2012, 05:54 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by freisste
My understanding was that you could primary as long as you want, just add the dry hops a certain time before the END of your time. That is, work backward from the end of your timeline. Just don't add dry hops as soon as fermentation is complete or during an extended primary you will lose your aroma.
This should work too but hops and bitterness fades with time so to maximize I like to make the process as quick as possible usually drink with in 14 days
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