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Old 07-31-2013, 07:17 AM   #1
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Default Overnight Mashing is a Thing?!

Just caught wind of this possibility. My brew day is between 7 and 8 hours long and I'd love to break that up. Who out there has experience with this novel idea? Pros are obvious... are there cons?

Thanks guys!

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Old 07-31-2013, 07:33 AM   #2
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You can do it, but if you ever smelled the MLT the next day, you run the risk of having it go bad. But yes I've done something like that with out probelms. I started a thread about time savers here (not that you need to save time):
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/what-saves-time-brew-day-418441/

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Old 07-31-2013, 07:39 AM   #3
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I do really long mashes sometimes (3-6 hours) but the wort is still safe from contamination etc. because it's still 140F or more. I like getting things going early morning and coming back to it after I've done a few things I need to do.

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Old 07-31-2013, 11:18 AM   #4
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Would you consider changing your technique to reduce the time it takes to brew a batch. I can do a 5 gallon batch in 3 1/2 to 4 hours with more than 75% efficiency.

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Old 07-31-2013, 12:20 PM   #5
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I don't know if the mash temperature is high enough to kill off the bacteria that is naturally present on the grains and would worry about getting a sour mash. I really would not want to wake up in the morning and drain off my first runnings to find out that I have what smells like a 4 day dead racoon sitting in 130 degree weather pouring into my BK. I just like to set aside adequate time to enjoy the brewday with no stress. Or if you really want to split up your brewday you can do the no-chill or after the mash bring it to a boil to sterilize, put a lid on the container and seal with plastic wrap, then do your boil the next day.

just my $0.02

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Old 07-31-2013, 12:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Would you consider changing your technique to reduce the time it takes to brew a batch. I can do a 5 gallon batch in 3 1/2 to 4 hours with more than 75% efficiency.
RM-MN, I don't want to open old wounds, but I recall calling you out on this in the past, and I believe you were counting the time from "doughing-in till pitching the yeast," and excluding the time spent weighing/milling the grains, heating the strike water, and then the eventual cleanup. Let's not mislead the OP.

That said, my brew days wrap up, start-to-finish, in 5 hours or less. Perhaps the OP could share a typical brewing day schedule and we can help identify some potential time-saving areas?
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Old 07-31-2013, 12:32 PM   #7
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RM-MN, I don't want to open old wounds, but I recall calling you out on this in the past, and I believe you were counting the time from "doughing-in till pitching the yeast," and excluding the time spent weighing/milling the grains, heating the strike water, and then the eventual cleanup. Let's not mislead the OP.

That said, my brew days wrap up, start-to-finish, in 5 hours or less. Perhaps the OP could share a typical brewing day schedule and we can help identify some potential time-saving areas?
Yeah, I'd like to see a video of this 3.5 hour brew day.
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Old 07-31-2013, 12:58 PM   #8
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Yea, I mill my grains in advance, and when the cooled wart is in the carboy, and also made the parti-gyle, I take a nap, then come back later and hit it with O2 and pitch the yeast. I've been known to leave most of the clean up for the next day. I bet if you add it all up, I'm 6-9hrs

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Old 07-31-2013, 01:29 PM   #9
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I can have an all grain batch done in just at or just under 5 hours. My best so far is probably 4.5 hrs. I started my Brew day Sunday at 4pm and by start I mean I began taking the cover off my stand and kettles, hooked up the propane tank, uncoiled the hose, and started filling the HLT with water. I was done by 9pm with 5 gallons in a carboy in the ferm chamber with yeast and I was sitting on the couch. All the gear was fully cleaned and put away except for the stuff that was hanging to dry like the hoses and my plate chiller.

Measure and mill your grain while the HLT is warming up
Measure and divide out your boil additions while the mash is going
Batch sparge.
If you must cut time somewhere cut your mash to 45 minutes.
Start the flame on the boil kettle while you are running your wort into it. Do not wait until have finished your sparge/runnings.
Clean your mashtun while the boil is going.
Sanitize your fermenter and transfer gear while the boil is going.
Put away pretty much every thing you do not need to chill and transfer while the boil is going.
Run your hot chiller output water into a vessel with PBW or Oxyclean
Buy a plate chiller
As soon as you have run the wort into the fermenter and capped it with an airlock/bung rinse and dump your boil kettle
Refill the boil kettle with the waiting hot PBW solution, a quick scrub of break/hop material, dump, rinse, invert to dry.
Pitch yeast and put the Fermenter in the ferm chamber.
Finish putting things away in their proper place and your day is done.

With all that said I do know a fellow that mashes overnight for every single batch. He has a fairly wide and short pot he uses as a mashtun. He doughs in and then sticks the whole thing in the oven set at 150 (warming setting for his oven). He goes to bed and leaves it be. He returns the next morning where he mashes out, sparges, and starts his boil. So he more or less mashes every beer at 150 degrees. He does not have any tight temperature control over the mash and I am not sure how well the oven maintains that set point. Most importantly he does not make good beer. I have had one beer from him that was passable/drinkable. Most of his beers have significant flaws.

Can you do it? Sure. Should you do it? Probably not, there are better ways to improve your brew day and cut down on your time investment. I have mashed for 2, 3, and even 4 days doing sour mash Berliner beers. In most cases things turned out ok but in one case putrid baby vomit is about the only way I could describe it.

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Old 07-31-2013, 03:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombat View Post
RM-MN, I don't want to open old wounds, but I recall calling you out on this in the past, and I believe you were counting the time from "doughing-in till pitching the yeast," and excluding the time spent weighing/milling the grains, heating the strike water, and then the eventual cleanup. Let's not mislead the OP.

That said, my brew days wrap up, start-to-finish, in 5 hours or less. Perhaps the OP could share a typical brewing day schedule and we can help identify some potential time-saving areas?
Yes you did call me out on this and no, it isn't just the dough in to pitching. I can count from the time I start bring equipment from my basement until it is cleaned and put away. I'm doing it BIAB and I an quite efficient on my brew day. I'll get the pot full of water and begin heating while I bring the rest of the equipment and weight the grains. Since I am heating on the kitchen stove (electric) it takes a while to heat up so I mill the grains with my Corona style mill. Since they are milled fine, I only need a 30 minute mash, probably less because using the iodine test, my starch is converted in less than 10 minutes due to the fineness of the grains. Pull the bag of grains out of the pot and turn the burner on high again to bring it to boil and then squeeze the rest of the wort out of the grains and add it back to the pot. While it is heating to boil, make sure the fermenter bucket is clean and has sanitizer in it. Put the grain mill away, dump the spent grains and rinse the bag they were in and hang to dry. Add hops as soon as the hot break falls, boil for an hour. Put the pot into a big tub of cold water with ice (snow if in season) and let it chill while I finish any more cleanup, then dump it into the fermenter and pitch the yeast. Clean up the pot and put it away.

Now I suppose you want to tell me I can't bottle a 5 gallon batch in less than 2 hours too.
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