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Old 04-25-2011, 11:49 PM   #11
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I like to boil my priming sugar in the microwave. It is very difficult to do that with DME because it will boil over. I only primed with DME a couple of times.

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Old 04-26-2011, 02:02 AM   #12
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Why does the AA% have anything to do with priming? It doesn't come into play with dextrose? Why is it a factor with DME?

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Old 04-26-2011, 02:32 AM   #13
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Are you measuring by volume or weight? Dme alone shouldn't cause the inconsistencies you are experiencing.

And fwiw, every style has a different carb guideline, your temperature will rarely be exactly the same, and I'm willing to bet that your volume is slightly sufferer with every batch, all causing variations in carb amounts. A calculator really should be used with every batch.

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Old 04-26-2011, 02:47 AM   #14
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So, if you can use table sugar (sucrose) for priming, why would you use ANYTHING else?

Carb tabs? Corn sugar / dextrose? DME? Why make it difficult?

BTW, 2.5 oz works fine for 5g fermented at 65F. Look up the table yourself tho.

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Old 04-26-2011, 03:03 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnitzengiggle View Post
Why does the AA% have anything to do with priming? It doesn't come into play with dextrose? Why is it a factor with DME?
If i am using DME, then it does come into effect, becuase the yeast is using a certain part of the stuff to carb. It matters. Look at any DME calculator, you have to call out what type of DME (%AA) it is.

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Originally Posted by o4_srt View Post
Are you measuring by volume or weight? Dme alone shouldn't cause the inconsistencies you are experiencing.

And fwiw, every style has a different carb guideline, your temperature will rarely be exactly the same, and I'm willing to bet that your volume is slightly sufferer with every batch, all causing variations in carb amounts. A calculator really should be used with every batch.
I measure with a really good scale. From one calculator, for 5g at 68F for 2.4 volume CO2:

Glucose (dextrose or corn sugar) 4.1 oz
Sucrose (table sugar) 3.9 oz
DME 55% AA (eg: Laaglander) 9.5 oz
DME 70% AA (eg: Northwestern) 7.5 oz
DME 75% AA (eg: Munton & Fison) 7.0 oz

So, if I THOUGHT I had 55% but HAD 75%, that is going to be a rather foamy and over carbed beer. That is over priming by almost 40% more sugar than needed.

If my issue was measurement or mixing or the like, I would fix that. It is not.

I don't care for having to label the exact type of DME I have, and as I buy from several sources (I brew in a few counties) and the bags have no labels it is a pain to keep track of.

So yeah, the %AA makes a big difference, and if you don't know it you won't have correctly carbed beer.
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Old 04-26-2011, 03:22 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall_Yotie View Post
If i am using DME, then it does come into effect, becuase the yeast is using a certain part of the stuff to carb. It matters. Look at any DME calculator, you have to call out what type of DME (%AA) it is.



I measure with a really good scale. From one calculator, for 5g at 68F for 2.4 volume CO2:

Glucose (dextrose or corn sugar) 4.1 oz
Sucrose (table sugar) 3.9 oz
DME 55% AA (eg: Laaglander) 9.5 oz
DME 70% AA (eg: Northwestern) 7.5 oz
DME 75% AA (eg: Munton & Fison) 7.0 oz

So, if I THOUGHT I had 55% but HAD 75%, that is going to be a rather foamy and over carbed beer. That is over priming by almost 40% more sugar than needed.

If my issue was measurement or mixing or the like, I would fix that. It is not.

I don't care for having to label the exact type of DME I have, and as I buy from several sources (I brew in a few counties) and the bags have no labels it is a pain to keep track of.

So yeah, the %AA makes a big difference, and if you don't know it you won't have correctly carbed beer.

Alpha Acid %, or % Apparent Attenuation, lol

Guess I answered my own question, duh!
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Old 04-26-2011, 04:43 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Schnitzengiggle View Post
Alpha Acid %, or % Apparent Attenuation, lol

Guess I answered my own question, duh!
I was confused about that one too.
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Old 04-26-2011, 05:29 AM   #18
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I was confused about that one too.
Yeah most of the time when you see double-A and a percentage sign 9 times out of 10 it's about Alpha Acids, but he did put the percent sign in front of the double-A.

I think he did it on purpose!
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Old 04-26-2011, 06:17 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall_Yotie View Post
If i am using DME, then it does come into effect, becuase the yeast is using a certain part of the stuff to carb. It matters. Look at any DME calculator, you have to call out what type of DME (%AA) it is.
Yeah, if you don't know the brand/attenuation potential of the DME you are using either due to unlabeled brands or laziness, then yeah, you are going to have issues.

Is that really all this thread is about? Either buy DME with a traceable %AA or use something else. No need to rant about it.
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Old 04-26-2011, 06:28 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar View Post
Yeah, if you don't know the brand/attenuation potential of the DME you are using either due to unlabeled brands or laziness, then yeah, you are going to have issues.

Is that really all this thread is about? Either buy DME with a traceable %AA or use something else. No need to rant about it.
Yes, that is what the post/rant is about.

Unlabeled brands, no %AA mentioned. And yes, I am doing the "use something else" approach now; corn sugar. This is what I have mentioned since the beginning.

I figured if I had a point of frustration with brewing that has changed my process, I may as well share on a forum about home brewing.
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