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Old 11-10-2011, 12:54 AM   #11
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CO2 is good. 8% helps (10% to 12% is better ... pretty uncommon with cider tho). Very good sanitation helps a lot too.

Potassium sorbate kills the yeast. If you use it, you would add it along with Potassium metabisulfite. Follow the directions for both and don't over-add.
ok so i need two things to kill off the yeast? what do they both do? and just wondering also i rember reading something that adds a bit of tartness to the cider what woudl that be?
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Old 11-10-2011, 03:36 PM   #12
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Mermaid, I bottle all my cider with about 1lb of lactose per 5 gal. It gives it just enough sweetness to overcome that clingy dry taste. Lactose also adds a thicker, creamy feel when you drink it so I would add a max of 4 to 4.5 oz per gal. or you'll overcome it.

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Old 11-10-2011, 09:42 PM   #13
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So what would happen if you were to naturally carbonate and keg a cider, then after it's got a good carbonation level to it, you release the pressure and pour in some apple juice concentrate that has been treated with sorbate then add gas to repressurize?

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Old 11-10-2011, 10:04 PM   #14
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you can age the keg over winter before you add the sweetener, then add the sweetener (more juice sugar w/e). i backsweetended my graff with apple juice. it was in the keg for close to a month with no additional fermentation.

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I'm getting ingredients in the mail today, and I can't even taste my beer yet. What should I do?
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I would make a yeast starter, and pitch it into your mailbox.
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Old 11-11-2011, 03:19 AM   #15
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If you're gonna keg, why not kill the yeast and force carb it? Then you can sweeten all you want.

Honestly, most of the people with back sweetening issues are those of us who haven't upgraded to kegs yet

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Old 11-11-2011, 02:46 PM   #16
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Something else to consider about killing the yeast with sulfites is, some folks have allergies to them, so if you go that route and tap your keg for friends, etc. you might want to let folks know that the cider contains sulfites.

(most commercial wine these days use sulfites so it's not a big deal for most folks)

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Old 11-12-2011, 09:28 AM   #17
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Lactose is milk sugar and does work well. But some of your friends may have allergies to it.I have added a splash of Sprite or 7-up to sweeten and it gives a slight carbing to it when served; this works well as I can serve both sparking and dry from the same bottle. Cheers

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Old 11-12-2011, 09:35 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by BOBrob
Lactose is milk sugar and does work well.
Just one problem...

Lactose may be a sugar, but it's not very sweet at all. Brewers who know what they're doing use it more for body and mouthfeel rather than sweetness.

Yes, it's slightly sweet. But to achieve any significant amount of sweetness, you're going to end up with a pretty chewy cider, which just isn't right.

You can pasteurize. Or if you have a kegging system, stabilize or filter. I just prefer to use a sweetener (though I prefer my cinders dry, so I typically don't do anything). I use Splenda, but xylitol, Ace-K, and even aspartame are viable choices.

However, I'll be getting a keg system soon, and IMO, the best method with kegs is just to filter the yeast out, and use real sugar.
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Old 11-12-2011, 04:09 PM   #19
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As mentioned, Lactose isn't a really a sweetener. Also, a "dry" cider doesn't automatically mean "non-sweet" cider. All a dry cider is, is a cider that has had ALL of the natural sugar fermented out. Dry is in the finish, not the flavor profile. I've had many sweet ciders that have a dry finish.

Anyway, that said, I think it depends on how sweet you want it. If something is full of apple flavor, I personally don't think it needs THAT much sweet to it. I don't find Woodchuck to be all that sweet (or dry in the finish for that matter). I find something like this to be MUCH drier have a LOT more complex apple flavor and as sweet as Woodchuck. Woodchuck tastes like lightly carbonated apple flavored beer to me more than "hard cider". I really think that I could take Miller Light, let it go a little flat, add apple juice and get Woodchuck.

NOT that there's ANYTHING wrong with that, people should drink what they like, but my palliate finds Hard Cider and Woodchuck to be mutually exclusive.

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Old 11-12-2011, 04:11 PM   #20
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Double Post!

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