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Old 12-22-2010, 06:22 AM   #1
bonsaimonkeymom21
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Default yeasty smell

I started a sastuma tangerine wine last week and its got a yeasty smell, I was just wondering if I didnt add enough oranges or if something was wrong..
If I add more oranges and let it sit for another week before filtering for the first time would it hurt?

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Old 12-22-2010, 08:08 AM   #2
Zwetschgen
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Your post is a little vague, but I will try to help. I'm not sure what you mean by "...filtering it for the first time..." If you started last week it is not time to filter it, and if you filter at all, you only filter once I imagine. I think you mean racking it, siphoning it from once container to another. I think you may have run into a problem with your wine sitting on the gross lees too long. Once you pitch your yeast the juice will being to ferment, it may take a day or so to start, but then once the majority of the fermentation is complete after a few days (SG 1.030-1.010 or so) you need to rack it off the lees into a secondary, it shouldn't sit on the dead yeast for a week... This may or may not be your problem.
Another possible 'problem' is that while fermenting yeast some times just smells bad, it might go away once the fermenting slows.
Another possible problem, although it does not smell 'yeasty' but certainly smells horrible, is too much H2S, it has all kinds of causes from too many campden tablets to not enough nutrients. You may benefit from vigorously racking the wine, introducing a lot of air to the wine, and this can help it... Without much else to work with, this would be my advice.

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Old 12-22-2010, 08:57 AM   #3
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It smells like yeast? What's the problem? It's full of yeast, it's bound to smell like it! I don't know much about making satsuma tangerine wine, but given time the yeast will finish it's job and settle out, then the smell should go away. Filtering should do the same, but making wine in a week sounds a tad rushed!

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Old 12-22-2010, 11:43 AM   #4
CampFireWine
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If it smells like an orange pie baking, you have hit the sweet spot.

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Old 12-30-2010, 08:38 PM   #5
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Hmmm.... never had orange pie before.

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Old 12-31-2010, 05:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zwetschgen View Post
Once you pitch your yeast the juice will being to ferment, it may take a day or so to start, but then once the majority of the fermentation is complete after a few days (SG 1.030-1.010 or so) you need to rack it off the lees into a secondary, it shouldn't sit on the dead yeast for a week... This may or may not be your problem.
A week is not nearly, nearly long enough for autolysis to start -- I doubt fermentation is even finished after a week. OP, what was your OG, and what's the current gravity? You can let it sit on the lees for several months without worrying about the yeast breaking down.

Give it time -- it heals most things, including beer and wine. There's a reason wine is several years old before it's sold.
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Old 01-01-2011, 10:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vespoli View Post
A week is not nearly, nearly long enough for autolysis to start -- I doubt fermentation is even finished after a week. OP, what was your OG, and what's the current gravity? You can let it sit on the lees for several months without worrying about the yeast breaking down.

Give it time -- it heals most things, including beer and wine. There's a reason wine is several years old before it's sold.
Oh, so you haven't met CampFireWine before?
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