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Old 08-12-2011, 07:18 PM   #1
Dirty
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Default BTU to Watts conversion

Does any one know the math or website that can convert one to the other.

Bayou Classic has there banjo with a stand on sale was wondering which is going to give me more bang for the buck

The Banjo is up to 210000btu. What do i need in a Heating element to come close to this or what does a 5500w element equal in btu.

Time is a factor in my brew day as i work 7days a week.

Thanks

Rock Chalk

Chris

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:29 PM   #2
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http://www.borino.com/GYC/wattsbtu_calculator.htm

This may help
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Old 08-12-2011, 07:57 PM   #3
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The conversion factor won't answer the question you have. Not completely, anyway.

A large percentage of btu's ( or heat energy ) from a flame is thrown away to the air and surrounding objects. All of the energy from an electrical element goes to the water (except an insignificant amount lost in the home wiring and any switching apparatus, like a solid state relay).

I've done a bunch of these calculations, and I have several threads with graphs that can help you here. If you want that stuff, just ask and I'll track it down.

BTW...

1 BTU/hr = 0.293 Watts

210,000 BTU/hr * 0.293 = 61530 Watts

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Old 08-12-2011, 07:59 PM   #4
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I don't think its a direct conversion because with propane, a lot of heat never gets into the water. With electric, everything goes into the water.

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Old 08-12-2011, 08:09 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
The conversion factor won't answer the question you have. Not completely, anyway.

A large percentage of btu's ( or heat energy ) from a flame is thrown away to the air and surrounding objects. All of the energy from an electrical element goes to the water (except an insignificant amount lost in the home wiring and any switching apparatus, like a solid state relay).

I've done a bunch of these calculations, and I have several threads with graphs that can help you here. If you want that stuff, just ask and I'll track it down.

BTW...

1 BTU/hr = 0.293 Watts

210,000 BTU/hr * 0.293 = 61530 Watts
Lol. You beat me to it.
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Old 08-12-2011, 08:09 PM   #6
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Here's a graph of my 5500W element heating 10g water to a boil. About 40 minutes. See for yourself.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/how-many-btus-your-hurricane-natural-gas-burner-burning-168787/index2.html#post1957831

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Old 08-12-2011, 11:26 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
The conversion factor won't answer the question you have. Not completely, anyway.

A large percentage of btu's ( or heat energy ) from a flame is thrown away to the air and surrounding objects. All of the energy from an electrical element goes to the water (except an insignificant amount lost in the home wiring and any switching apparatus, like a solid state relay).

I've done a bunch of these calculations, and I have several threads with graphs that can help you here. If you want that stuff, just ask and I'll track it down.

BTW...

1 BTU/hr = 0.293 Watts

210,000 BTU/hr * 0.293 = 61530 Watts
Thanks

Exactly what im looking for


Chris
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