The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Brewing With Molasses

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-27-2011, 05:46 PM   #11
BBBF
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,021
Liked 45 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thomrenault View Post
I would think that the Molasses Flavor would work a bit better in Cider than in Beer. I added a cup to my first batch, and at a month it still tastes a bit... weird. I don't hate the taste of it, it's just a very unique taste. It totally masks the hop flavors. Instead the bitterness and flavor comes from the molasses, which isn't sweet anymore. I've heard that the flavor mellows well over time, so I'm just letting that batch sit, but I wouldn't add more than a cup to a 5 Gallon batch. I'd probably use a half cup in the future. I also added the Molasses to a light mildly hopped ale, so the flavor of the Molasses came through strongest, those flavors might be more balanced in a darker beer like a porter, stout, barleywine etc.
I recently had a comercial cider with molasses in it. I wouldn't say it was bad, but it wasn't my thing. I personally would only add molassess to a dark beer so that I can get the color, some unfermentable sugars and hopfully have some of the moasses flavor covered up by the roasted grains..
__________________
BBBF is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-12-2011, 09:52 AM   #12
PhilOssiferzStone
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: California
Posts: 44
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

/raises hand

None of the 19th century sources I've found mention *boiling* the molasses -- just draining your wort on it while it's still hot. A modern brewer would simply heat up the molasses a bit to make it runny, dump it in the bucket, and drain the cooled wort on it. Same effect.

Doesn't anyone think that maybe treating molasses like the mead people treat honey (no boil, just dump it in primary) might give better results? Or were our ancestors all idiots who enjoyed beer that tasted like a mineral vitamin supplement?

__________________
PhilOssiferzStone is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2011, 10:18 PM   #13
binaryc0de
Torrence Brewing
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
binaryc0de's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Conway, AR
Posts: 218
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Speaking of brewing with molasses... I'd like to know everyone's thoughts on the beginning recipe in this thread (Thomas Jefferson Ale).
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/thom...son-ale-94598/

From reading the entire thread I don't believe this is an authentic Thomas Jefferson recipe but it may be somewhat close to a recipe of the time. I was thinking of cutting the molasses down to about 0.5lb.

binaryc0de is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2011, 12:42 AM   #14
snowydog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Grand Forks, BC
Posts: 18
Default

So I found this thread using the search, I was thinking of adding a portion of molasses to a Coopers Dark Ale Kit. I've been getting excellent batches since I switched to using mostly Dry Malt in place of corn sugar and was about to do this Dark Ale. I was thinking about 1000 Grams of Malt and 1 cup of Molasses ( guess the light is best ) what ya all think?

__________________
snowydog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-27-2011, 06:38 PM   #15
kontreren
Gluten Free Brewing
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kontreren's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 289
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Sorghum Malt vs Sorghum Molasses ???

Is there a difference between these two sorghums (molasses vs malt)? I have eaten sorghum molasses growing up and then brewed with sorghum malt. Essentially they taste the same to me. I have done some internet searching but not found the right search combo to get an answer. Just wondering if any of you might know?

__________________

Thankx,
Jesse, Home and Gluten Free Brewer

Member, Forsyth Masonic Lodge #707
Member, Winston Salem WortHawgs Brew Club
Lifetime Member, NRA
Lifetime Supporter, Homebrewtalk.com

http://www.worthawgs.org

http://www.queensboro.com/ref/EBCMMMSCNNN

http://iam.homebrewtalk.com/kontreren

http://www.bellaonline.com/site/Beer

kontreren is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-27-2011, 08:17 PM   #16
mr_y82
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: asheville, nc
Posts: 100
Default

I think they have pretty much become synonyms... but don't quote me on that... I know that things made locally here in the southeast are labelled molasses...but it is a temperate climate...

Papazian says sorghum is made from sweet sorghum, grown in temperate climates... but says use it like molasses...

wiki:
"Sweet sorghum syrup is called "molasses" or "sorghum molasses" in some regions of the U.S., but the term molasses more properly refers to a different sweet syrup, made as a byproduct of the sugarcane or sugar beet production."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_sorghum


Quote:
Originally Posted by snowydog View Post
So I found this thread using the search, I was thinking of adding a portion of molasses to a Coopers Dark Ale Kit. I've been getting excellent batches since I switched to using mostly Dry Malt in place of corn sugar and was about to do this Dark Ale. I was thinking about 1000 Grams of Malt and 1 cup of Molasses ( guess the light is best ) what ya all think?
go for it... no harm will be done... and it makes alcohol... it's really a win/win....
__________________
"Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine, a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy." - Ben Franklin 1779
mr_y82 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-27-2011, 09:14 PM   #17
KevinM
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 1,171
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Sorghum molasses is the traditionally known process, where they squeeze sorghum cane and boil down the liquid. Somewhat similar to the process of sugar cane.

Sorghum syrup used for brewing (from briess) is different. This type of syrup is created by enzymaticlly processing sorghum grain. Usually white sorghum.

__________________

Primary: Sake
Secondary: GF Czech Lager
Waiting to be kegged, Italian Primitivo
Kegged&Ready: GF Orange&Coriander, GF Honey Lager, GF chocolate ale, GF English ale, Island mist (zinfandel), Island mist (cbry malbec).
Bottled: Infected Mead, Dry Hard ciders, Accidental Sorghumwine, various unnamed.

KevinM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-28-2011, 02:01 PM   #18
No_Party
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Nashvegas, TN
Posts: 167
Default

I've brewed two batches using sorghum molasses as my fermentable and so far both are terrible. I may try again one day but up the IBUs to make it an IPA. The hops may mask the sorghum better in higher quantities. Though when using just sorghum molasses it turns into more of a hopped mead.

__________________
“When I read about the evils of drinking, I gave up reading" - Paul Hornung
No_Party is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-29-2011, 05:43 AM   #19
mr_y82
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: asheville, nc
Posts: 100
Default

I tried making a gluten free beer for my wife without doing any research... it was mostly sorghum molasses with some honey... 2 weeks after bottling it still tasted like the **** coming out of a blow-off tube on a high gravity highly hopped stout...

It still hasn't cleared completely... but I am going to age it for a while and see... been a few months already...

I think as long as you don't add more than .5-1lb in a 5-6 gallon batch, the flavor should not be negatively effected (unless you don't like molasses)... I've only used it about 3 times... so I am no expert.

__________________
"Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine, a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy." - Ben Franklin 1779
mr_y82 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2011, 02:00 AM   #20
elvestinkle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 144
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I have been using it in my little 3-gallon stovetop batches to good effect. My first was with 22oz amber DME, 8 oz of molasses, 8 oz demerera, and Chinook as the bittering hop. That was a nice combination, and it has repeated well. Obviously this is not gluten free, but I imagine swapping sorghum as the base malt won't be too harmful to the flavor, and I intend to follow up this winter with it to see if it's true.

For my new batch I dumped a full pound in and switched up the bittering hop to Centennial. Will let you know how it turns out--primary fermentation is just winding down.

__________________

Last edited by elvestinkle; 11-02-2011 at 02:03 AM.
elvestinkle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brewing with Molasses rolf Mead Forum 18 07-28-2013 09:25 AM
Using Molasses? Schlenkerla General Techniques 19 01-25-2013 03:05 AM
Molasses Rivercat96 Recipes/Ingredients 13 08-16-2012 08:28 PM
Using Molasses Indiana Red All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 01-06-2008 02:18 AM
Molasses Anyone? jaymack Recipes/Ingredients 2 08-23-2005 12:49 AM