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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Proposed Style Guidelines. Cascadian Dark Ale
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:38 PM   #21
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Pretentious name, pretentious description. Turns me off from the whole style, even though I've had some great beers that would apparently fall into this category. Pass on the name, get someone less... biased to write the description.

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Old 02-08-2010, 08:53 PM   #22
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Yeah, I can pretty much guarantee you all that "this ale celebrates the wonders of Pacific Northwest hops" stuff won't make any published guideline, so why write it now?

I think the big problem I have is that if you do this style you should include strong hoppy brown ales in the same style. The problem there is those have been around a lot longer and aren't from the NW.

And really, 40+ SRM?

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Old 02-08-2010, 10:15 PM   #23
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Meh... Its cool to see some attempt at recognition for a style that is distictly regional in origin, and I love the focus on the PNW hops. But the fact is 75% of the US hop crop is grown in the Yakima valley, so any dark hoppy beer could technically fall into this catagory.

I do think it interesting that many of those opposed to this are from outside the region. I'm curious how much exposure they have to the beer we drink and brew and how our Cascadian beer culture differs from theirs. I know I certainly wouldn't feel confident slighting a stylistic guideline based on beers from the midwest or east coast. Just sayin'.

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Old 02-08-2010, 10:35 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EMPyre View Post
Meh... Its cool to see some attempt at recognition for a style that is distictly regional in origin, and I love the focus on the PNW hops. But the fact is 75% of the US hop crop is grown in the Yakima valley, so any dark hoppy beer could technically fall into this catagory.

I do think it interesting that many of those opposed to this are from outside the region. I'm curious how much exposure they have to the beer we drink and brew and how our Cascadian beer culture differs from theirs. I know I certainly wouldn't feel confident slighting a stylistic guideline based on beers from the midwest or east coast. Just sayin'.
I'm not opposed to the introduction of new styles at all. I generally think that style guidelines are limited and pushing boundaries can only make for more interesting beers. However, lots of these beers are not being make to celebrate the Nrothwest or whatever. The best Black IPA I've had was one from Port Brewing in Carlsbad, CA. They were making it to celebrate the anniversary of a bar, and certainly not to jerk off the Northwest.

I am certainly aware of the culture and the amazing amount of beer that comes from the area. Being the proper climate to grow hops definitely helps, and the culture has definitely made it a great area for beer. However, the name is so over the top. The first thing people who see it will say is, "Where the **** is Cascadia?"

I know it is less "correct", but I still think the style name "Black IPA" makes a lot more sense. You could still talk about American hops in the descriptor, you could still give it the same properties, but you'd confuse a lot less people.

There was a push to rename the IIPA to "San Diego Pale Ale". As much as it amuses me being from San Diego and all, I have to say it is really unnecessary and while the Imperial at the beginning of that name is nonsensical in historic terms (of that particular style), we still all get it.
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Old 02-08-2010, 10:53 PM   #25
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I'm from Portland and I don't like it.

For one thing, IPAs with roasted grains (the big American brown ales) have been around for a long time and did not originate in the PNW. The switch from chocolate malt to carafa special which made the beer darker with less roasty flavor was a PNW twist but if you want to give credit for dark IPAs to a particular region, give it to Texas.

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Old 02-08-2010, 10:56 PM   #26
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Quote:
The best Black IPA I've had was one from Port Brewing in Carlsbad, CA.
I'd argue that much (if not all of) California could be considered geographically part of 'Cascadia'. The mountains that define the region run from Central British Columbia to Northern California, and some could argue to Mexico. Its this region that has shaped a lot of micrbeer culture and this homage is fitting to some extent. However like I metioned previously, with 75% of hops grown in Central Washington for the US markets can you really argue that there are "Northwest" hops? I get it though, Cascade is certainly a regional varietal both in name and heritage. But again what is the linage of that variety? Hops strains come and go, and if they are nearly all being grown out west, well..

I guess maybe calling it an American Dark Western Ale or something could be more fitting. But I think the idea is really to give a distinction to the regional trend of darker color and copious amounts of Cascade...
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Old 02-08-2010, 11:08 PM   #27
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What about American Dark Ale?
No, no, we should actually go back and re-name anything labeled as "american" to give props to whichever hood it was thunk up in.

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I find it amusing that the OREGON brewers place such a repeated emphasis on the use of NW hops in the guideline. I count 8 such references. Maybe we should just cut to the chase and require that the beer be brewed in the northwest.
Right, so we can just brew the same recipe with English or German hops and make up our own name.
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Old 02-08-2010, 11:17 PM   #28
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I'm going to be the first to brew an Imperial Stout with only citra hops and fermented in a red wine barrel. It'll be called the Gregory Street stout and it will be terrible. I just want my own geographical style.

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Old 02-09-2010, 12:02 AM   #29
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Wow, such hate. Honestly isn't this just the recognition of a common trend in brewer culture currently? If you do something different and it catches on and after a decade its pretty common and has legitmate commercial production what's wrong with classifying it? So maybe it is a happy handy to the PNW crowd, but honestly, this is what's happening up here. This beer is a style and damn near every pico, micro, and quasi macro craft brewer is doing something that fits this style in the region.

Besides the BJCP has plenty of other 'regional' catagories, how about: 12C Baltic Porter, 6A Cream Ale, 6C Kolsch to name but a few...

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Old 02-09-2010, 12:11 AM   #30
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I don't hate it. I just think it is silly and pretentious.

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