Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > How long does a 3/8" 20' IC take to cool to pitch?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-24-2009, 01:03 AM   #11
MacBruver
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 616
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

That's awesome! definitely a much better use of space. The only challenge I could see would be stirring the wort, but you might not even need to with that design.

I got 3.5 gals down to 75F in 11 minutes when I brewed on saturday, and mine is just one big coil.

__________________
MacBruver is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 02:21 PM   #12
RedIrocZ-28
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RedIrocZ-28's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 854
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts

Default

Hopaholic, that was the point of this design, there is absolutely no need to stir the wort that I can tell because there is never more than a few inches between the wort and the next closest coil.

I have a few more pics that I'll post real quick to show how much coverage this coil setup has.



What I thought was important was to have the outer edge of the wort chilled next to the walls of the kettle because the walls of the kettle are going to retain heat the most, as well as getting Max coverage of the wort via interwoven coils so there isn't, like I said earlier, more than a few inches between hot wort and another ice cold coil.

The cold break was amazing, I have never seen this amount of trub left on the bottom of the brewpot before. I can only imagine what a longer coil would do for me in say a 7.5gal pot like I plan to get so I can start making 6.5gal batches.

__________________

Last edited by RedIrocZ-28; 02-28-2009 at 10:50 PM.
RedIrocZ-28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 03:29 PM   #13
jds
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jds's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Littleton, CO
Posts: 1,947
Liked 17 Times on 14 Posts

Default

I remember seeing a side artice in BYO a few months back about the Frankenchiller:

Brew Your Own: The How-To Homebrew Beer Magazine - Frankenchiller

Tests with Denver water in March (~40F out of the tap), the article claims just over 3 minutes to pitching temperature. Of course, it's probably got $150 worth of copper in it.

OT: Keggle owners, spray some cold water onto the lower skirt of the keg at the start of chilling. It holds a lot of heat.

My 25' IC goes from boil to pitch in about 20 minutes for a 5.5 gallon boil.

__________________
jds is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 05:28 PM   #14
RedIrocZ-28
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RedIrocZ-28's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 854
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts

Default

Wow, just wow, to me that design looks like overkill and a bit inefficient. I have no doubt that my little chiller could do 10 minutes or under if I were to have immersed the brewpot in a cold water bath instead of setting in on the counter. I felt the pot at intervals and only when the temperature of the wort in the center got down to about 120 did the sides of the pot become cool enough to touch.

Darn, looks like I am going to have to brew again.... for scientific purposes of course!

__________________
RedIrocZ-28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 07:30 PM   #15
CBBaron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CBBaron's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 2,787
Liked 6 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedIrocZ-28 View Post
Hopaholic, that was the point of this design, there is absolutely no need to stir the wort that I can tell because there is never more than a few inches between the wort and the next closest coil.

What I thought was important was to have the outer edge of the wort chilled next to the walls of the kettel because the walls of the ketel are going to retain heat the most, as well as getting Max coverage of the wort via interwoven coils so there isn't, like I said earlier, more than a few inches between hot wort and another ice cold coil.
Nice design. If you are not going to stir the wort this is a pretty good design because it distributes the coils even throughout the wort. However don't assume that you could not chill faster with agitated wort. Fluid motion around the coils will increase the rate of heat exchange between the copper and wort. This will improve the efficiency of you chiller even with your distribution. Also depending on the environment the outside walls of the pot should cool fairly quickly as the large surface area of the highly conductive metal conducts the heat to the outside air. With 20F outside temps I know that was not a problem with my last brew. However it sounds like you get plenty fast cooling with it as is and you don't have to attend the cooling.

I believe the main reason for the design of most chillers is manufacturing ease. It is very simple to wrap tubing at a constant radius.

Craig
__________________
CBBaron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 07:45 PM   #16
RedIrocZ-28
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RedIrocZ-28's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 854
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts

Default

CBBaron, I like your take on this. And I do believe you are right about the reason for the commercial chillers to be a single coil. Mine was very simple though, just a paint can and about 15 minutes to wrap the coils, and 15 minutes to attach all the fittings and do a leak test. Can't wait for Thursday.

__________________
RedIrocZ-28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 07:46 PM   #17
flyangler18
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 5,679
Liked 26 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Pump that IC up and down in the wort and you will chill in record time.

__________________
flyangler18 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 07:53 PM   #18
RedIrocZ-28
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RedIrocZ-28's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 854
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyangler18 View Post
Pump that IC up and down in the wort and you will chill in record time.
It is already at the top of the wort as it sits. So you guys are suggesting the agitation of the wort? That re-suspends the coldbreak though, I thought you wanted to avoid that stuff getting into the fermenter?
__________________
RedIrocZ-28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 10:48 PM   #19
flyangler18
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 5,679
Liked 26 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedIrocZ-28 View Post
It is already at the top of the wort as it sits. So you guys are suggesting the agitation of the wort? That re-suspends the coldbreak though, I thought you wanted to avoid that stuff getting into the fermenter?
Yes, by agitating the wort, you will get more efficient cooling. As far as the break material goes, try a technique called whirlpooling. After cooling, stir vigorously for a few minutes, cover and walk away for 20+ minutes. The kettle trub will form a cone in the center and you can siphon from the outside edge of the kettle, minimizing transfer of break material into the fermenter.
__________________
flyangler18 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 02:11 PM   #20
RedIrocZ-28
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RedIrocZ-28's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 854
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts

Default

I think I will try this whirlpool technique tomorrow on my day off. I am thinking of maybe doing a 3 gal batch of "The Dark Lord" just to see if I can clone it. I'm betting 5-6 minutes cooling time with this chiller and the pot immersed in a cold water bath.

__________________
RedIrocZ-28 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cool Video-"I Am A Craft Brewer" GroosBrewz General Beer Discussion 1 06-27-2009 08:12 PM
12 Week after first "yeast pitch" - no head/bubbles JerryGallant Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 24 09-15-2008 05:39 PM
Is this temp too cool to pitch in? Eskimo Spy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 08-25-2008 04:55 PM
what is "pitching temp" ? ie: what do you pitch at? tranceamerica General Techniques 19 06-10-2008 05:59 PM
Did I pitch too cool??? JohnnyK68 Extract Brewing 11 01-12-2007 11:18 AM