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Old 05-29-2008, 01:13 PM   #11
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Well without special preparation yeast don't survive freezing too well, plus you can't really pitch yeast onto a block of ice and expect anything. So I suppose you could pitch yeast into 34 degree wort, you won't get fermentation but they won't die from it. You'd need to warm it up near the recommended fermentation temp to actually make beer though.

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Old 01-18-2011, 11:06 PM   #12
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Along the same lines... what is the best way to kill yeast once your beer is bottled? My brown ale had an OG of 1.048 and FG of 1.021 using Safale S-04. I knew this was too high but I got the same reading for a week even after resuspending the yeast, moving to a warmer room, and repitching new (US-05) yeast. I bottled it yesterday thinking maybe that was the lowest the gravity was going to get but when I opened a bottle today it's already starting to gush. What are my options to salvage the bottles? Pasteurize the bottles in 190F water? Freeze them? I'd rather not uncap them since they will gush out. The recipe was:

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 5.25 gal
Boil Size: 7.25 gal
Estimated OG: 1.048 SG
Estimated Color: 20.0 SRM
Estimated IBU: 29.8 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 63.00 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount Item Type % or IBU
7.00 lb Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 63.64 %
2.00 lb Victory Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 18.18 %
1.00 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 9.09 %
0.75 lb Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 6.82 %
0.25 lb Chocolate Wheat Malt (400.0 SRM) Grain 2.27 %
1.00 oz Willamette [4.70 %] (60 min) Hops 17.6 IBU
0.50 oz Willamette [4.70 %] (30 min) Hops 6.8 IBU
0.50 oz Willamette [4.70 %] (20 min) Hops 5.3 IBU
1.05 tsp Irish Moss (Boil 10.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs SafAle English Ale (DCL Yeast #S-04) Yeast-Ale


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out
Total Grain Weight: 11.00 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out
Step Time Name Description Step Temp
60 min Mash In Add 14.52 qt of water at 169.1 F 154.0 F

----
I hate to revive a dead thread but it seemed better than starting a whole new one. I went ahead and moved both cases of bottles to my sub 32F garage to slow the action. What's my best course of action? Is it possible to reverse the gushing?

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Old 01-19-2011, 12:47 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hibbleton View Post
Along the same lines... what is the best way to kill yeast once your beer is bottled? My brown ale had an OG of 1.048 and FG of 1.021 using Safale S-04. I knew this was too high but I got the same reading for a week even after resuspending the yeast, moving to a warmer room, and repitching new (US-05) yeast. I bottled it yesterday thinking maybe that was the lowest the gravity was going to get but when I opened a bottle today it's already starting to gush. What are my options to salvage the bottles? Pasteurize the bottles in 190F water? Freeze them? I'd rather not uncap them since they will gush out.
----
I hate to revive a dead thread but it seemed better than starting a whole new one. I went ahead and moved both cases of bottles to my sub 32F garage to slow the action. What's my best course of action? Is it possible to reverse the gushing?
Believe it or not, I think the best thing to do is bring them back where it's warm and let them finish carbing, then cool them. I think they are gushing because the carbon dioxide hasn't had time to dissolve into the beer and is in a real hurry to get back out.
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:07 AM   #14
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That's a possibility. One day does seem like a very short time to be over carbonated already.

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Old 01-19-2011, 11:26 AM   #15
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Open one cold and see if it's carbed. If it is, don't warm them up and drink them fast.

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Old 01-20-2011, 04:47 PM   #16
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We had a batch that was overcarbed, we just got them to 32* opened and poured straight into a glass. The beer was great, perfectly carbed.

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Old 11-20-2012, 06:42 PM   #17
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I know this is a long dead topic, but I have a few concerns.

I pasteurized a batch of cider yesterday in my keg. This was after cold crashing and racking twice to clear it. Only problem is, I didn't have a thermometer, and I was worried about evaporating off the alcohol. So I got the keg hot enough to the point where it was too hot to keep my palm on for more than 5 seconds. I'm guessing 120-130 degrees, and held it there for 15 minutes. Think that was hot enough to kill the already low-cell count colony of yeast in my cider?

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Old 11-20-2012, 09:22 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurmey View Post
According to the Master Baker at LeSaffre yeast 140° is the death toll for yeast, however, 120° is the injury point. I'm not too surprised that your yeast survived at 130° but it was not a kind thing to do to it.
140º sounds right to me, but I've seen a chart somewhere that even at 140º it takes several minutes — more than I would have thought – to actually kill the yeast. Pasteurization to kill yeast requires the liquid brought up to around 160º and held for 10 minutes or more.
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Old 07-31-2013, 12:21 AM   #19
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What are my options to salvage the bottles? Pasteurize the bottles in 190F water? Freeze them? I'd rather not uncap them since they will gush out.

Okay, I realize the question was 4 years ago, but for anyone else wondering the same thing. NOOooooo! If you heat capped bottles to 190, I am 99% sure they will explode. If you freeze them they will explode... If you un-cap and then heat them to 190 they will boil out the alcohol and your stuck with o'douls.

Unfortunately I have no good answer. Refrigerating may slow the yeast enough to cease the effects until you drink it but if they are already under too much co2 pressure, nothing short of opening them will relieve it. Opening the bottles and pastuetizing at a lower temp may be your best fix, but then you still need to figure out how to "prime" your bottles again for recapping. You can't just add sugar, because the yeast is dead at this stage.


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Old 12-02-2013, 02:51 AM   #20
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Another test case. My second 5 gallon batch. Made my diy wort chiller today. Put it in. Oh man was it fast. Crazy fast. Moved my wort into the my storage can. Pitched in the yeast. Did some oxygen addition. Said that is way to hot to the touch. Check again. Somehow i put the digital thermometer on Celsius. It was 134. Freak out time. Back into the pot. Re-chill. Now....the wait.

And if it fails. I now have to make 5 batches to break even on the start up cost. Har.

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