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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Closed-system pressurized fermentation technique!
View Poll Results: What do you guys think about pressure fermentations? Time for a poll.
I've done it and I liked it just fine! 82 11.25%
I've done it, nothing wrong with it, but prefer normal fermentation techniques. 20 2.74%
I've done it, hate it, and never will do it again! 4 0.55%
I've never done it, but it is on my list! 544 74.62%
I've never done anything. I only brew beer in my mind. 79 10.84%
Voters: 729. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-11-2012, 11:00 AM   #1601
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I have been fermenting under pressure for over 5 years developing the OneDerBrew system. I use a pressure relief valve and have tried fermenting at 5,10,15,20,25,30, psi I have done ales and lagers, extract and all grain. Fermentation stops at about 30 to 32 psi but will resume if the pressure is dropped. The best results are when the pressure is kept between 10 and 18 psi.
I now aerate the wort using agitation and a drop of olive oil (a toothpick dipped in olive oil for 5 gallons). I have made over 900 batches using this method and have done many split batches to compare results,(pressure verses no pressure)(aeration techniques).
If pressure is maintained from the beginning of fermentation when the yeast are multiplying, (off flavors) fusal alcohols and Esters are drastically reduced. I spoke with Chris White from White labs at the homebrew conference in Seattle.
He endorsed this technique but said that it may reduce Esters in some of the Belgium style beers that want to retain some of the fruity ester y notes.
I agree somewhat but i still can get the result i am looking for with proper yeast selection.
By the way the folks at White labs are extremely helpful and easy to talk to.

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Old 11-11-2012, 02:00 PM   #1602
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Glad to know even Chris White supports that this technique isn't the boogieman. I am getting great results from leaving it open until I smell the burn, usually very strong the next morning when I check on it, then going to a slow crank down to build pressure. I try to hit 10 psi the day after pitching and hold that until I am 3-4 days in on an ale. Then I raise the temperature for a D-rest (even if it doesn't need one just to be sure) to 4-6*F above primary and set my carbonation per temperature each day thereafter about a psi or two higher than I want to finish (which is usually just the same as the highest volumes for that style in most cases). I am not even checking gravity anymore except post-boil and then FG when I have pulled my first pint. Easy brewing!

Onderbrew, I'm glad you are as experienced as you are with this technique, and being "in the biz" can get honest insight/advice into exactly as I've always said about it. It isn't a way to brew better beer, it is a way to "brew better" (read: for ease and simplicity for me). The added effects are a bonus, the single vessel is the reason for my treason from leaving the normal techniques behind IMHO.

With a keg and the techniques in this thread... Chill and Fill (or no-chill technique if you choose to), Ferment (and collect from cropping if set up), Lower esters and fusels (or don't and ferment like normal open to your blow-off buckets water pressure or airlock if you build it that way), Carbonate to finishing volumes while doing a diacetyl rest and then crash cool to settle and clean (or transfer after fermenting, crashing, resting and force carbonate later in your serving vessel like you've always done before). There is no down-side to me if you already keg your beer and can afford to build the spunding valve (which comes in really handy as a multi-tasker in the brew house filling kegs under counter-pressure).

Maybe it isn't catching on as a viable and accepted technique fast enough because the name is too long or something. I know there are some slower swimmers in life. Maybe I should rename the technique I use (but did not create myself) Ferm-UP. Then it sounds like a infomercial pill or gadget.

"Ferment Under Pressure, Ferm-UP America!"

I think I'm hungover a little bit from my delicious bounties from the keg-a-copia in my kegerator. :P

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Old 11-11-2012, 04:14 PM   #1603
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Id like to hear what yeasts people are having the best success with? Specifically a clean, bright profile for ales.

I've used the technique plenty but have been using up my supply of S-05 and am not happy with the weird flavor I'm getting; I contribute it to that specific yeast and not the process necessarily.

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Old 11-11-2012, 07:40 PM   #1604
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Pickles, I'd be happy to hear your exact process. Im very curious about this weird taste you speak of. I wonder if it is something that is just being overlooked because of simplicity. I hope to hear the whole process and ingredients from the start to see. I am very happy using strong starters and have maybe two batches that I can account to me and yeast rather than the technique.

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Old 11-12-2012, 01:54 PM   #1605
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Pickles, I have noticed great taste improvement in my beers by fermenting 3-4 days then ramping up to higher temperatures to finish. Do you do something similar?

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Old 11-12-2012, 02:08 PM   #1606
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No I was keeping temps pretty stable 62F-63F the whole time then a D-rest at 70F for a few days. My friends don't seem to notice the flavor but is about makes me gag. I don't have recipes off hand but all have been APAs and IPAs. Most had Simcoe in them, but can't remember rest of ingredients. They were pretty basic though mostly 2-row, crystal 40, maybe a dash of Munich. They were all fermented with S-05 though so I contributed the flavor to the yeast.

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Old 11-12-2012, 02:58 PM   #1607
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Weird! Doesn't sound like it could be anything but the yeast then. I have to always remember that I am my biggest and worst critic so I always take others advice in whether my beers are good or not. This blonde I just made is fantastic, but for some reason it became untapped and lost carbonation. It started tasting weird, then I noticed the pours slowing down. Retapped it, it carbonated back up after two days, and is back where it was when I thought it wonderful. So many things to tweak in this craft that can make the difference.

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Old 11-12-2012, 05:30 PM   #1608
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So that said, what yeast do you like for clean ales? I guess I'm curious what your go to yeast is? I know you mentioned really liking a yeast you recently tried, I think it was and English strain. I'm definitely sold on this technique for ease and simplicity; obviously it took a bit of work upfront to get the spunding set-up built but then its smooth sailing.

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Old 11-12-2012, 08:08 PM   #1609
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I really like wlp007 dry English ale yeast. Flocs like a sender bloc dropped in a swimming pool. I really like wlp001 for clean ales, but that's just like us-05 IMHO. I just started having better results after listening to Jamil about raising the temperature after initial growth and fermentation is completed to help the yeast clean up. I'm on to kolsch yeast now and will use that for almost everything. I just tried these others out, but kolsch is always my favorite being so lager-like. I have used it before in a stout. Best stout I ever tasted.

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Old 11-12-2012, 11:20 PM   #1610
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Do you use the kolsch yeast for APAs? I've always liked how clean my lagers turned out (only brewed a few) but I lager them traditionally. I assume your not fermenting the kolsch yeast in the mid-50's F right?

Anyone have a reliable APA or IPA recipe they've brewed with this technique? I'd love to get that dialed in as thats the majority of what I keep on tap.

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