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Old 06-26-2011, 01:33 AM   #521
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While it is true that the insects are a more sure-fire way of innoculating wort with wild yeast, they also carry other microbes that are less desireable for beer, such as acetobacteria, which are the microbes used in making vinegar, the best way to ensure the capture of wild yeasts and microbes that are desireable for brewing is to have a semi-fine mesh to keep fruit flies out but allow some particulate and spores in.

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Old 06-26-2011, 02:01 PM   #522
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Definitely true, perhaps especially for fruit flies - it's almost as though their legs were made-to-order for the purpose of spreading acetobacter, almost as high a priority for them to be reproducing their own kind.

...maggot-makers... I hate 'em....

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Old 06-27-2011, 07:00 AM   #523
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This thread has inspired me to try and catch some wild yeast near me. I wonder what kind of yeasties live in the big citrus groves near where I live. Or even out in the desert, like at Joshua Tree. The latter may have to wait for autumn, but the former I may be able to explore. I wonder if I can inoculate some sterile wort with a few picked orange blossoms off of a tree (they really frown upon picking oranges at the State Historic Park I am planning on getting some yeast from).

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Old 06-27-2011, 02:48 PM   #524
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You could always put some wort in a shallow container and dip an orange on the tree in the wort and then transfer it to a different container when you get home.

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Old 07-08-2011, 11:48 PM   #525
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Hey guys, long time reader, but this thread has inspired me to finally sign up.
My question is related to anti-bacterial substances. In theory wouldn't common anti-bacterial like penicillin protect the mini-wort from infection? Or would it kill off yeasts as well? I also have some oregano oil, which is supposed to be a natural anti bacterial. Would this help? Or just cause problems?

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Old 07-09-2011, 12:36 AM   #526
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Sure, people use streptomycin at 40 ug/mL or chloramphenicol at 50-100 ug/mL to catch yeast. Probably want to invest in a pipette to get the dosage right.

Antibiotics work by messing up some process that only bacteria do, leaving humans and yeast alive.

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Old 07-09-2011, 03:50 AM   #527
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Thanks for the info. Also, will lactic acid hurt the culture if I want to raise the acidity? I don't have any lemon juice at the moment. I'm going to try culturing the yeast from juniper berries and sap + unpasteurized natural honey.

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Old 07-10-2011, 05:09 AM   #528
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No, yeast do fine with lactic acid, and citric and acetic. If you add vinegar or lemon juice from a bottle, though, check that it doesn't contain other preservatives, which might inhibit yeast growth.

Honey contains lots of Zygosaccharomyces (and other yeasts) but the osmolarity is too high for Saccharomyces. Think about this -- your brewing yeast have a hard time living in a very sweet wort, so imagine how much more difficult life will be for them in honey. They just can't cut it there.

Also, the bloom on the surface of juniper berries is not yeast -- nor is the white stuff on grapes. These are just white powdery substances that plants make. You're as likely to find yeast on juniper as you are any other fruit with a thin skin. Try grapes or raisins (since they're very sweet) for a first pass.

I think the oregano oil sounded interesting. Thyme is supposed to be antibacterial as well. But of course the old standby hops do a good job in this department!

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Old 07-13-2011, 01:10 AM   #529
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Subscribed.

I am going to try this and I have the perfect beer to do so.

I brewed a Kentucky Common that I named Goat Holler Brown, for a street in Southern Indiana near where my fiancee grew up. When we go down to visit her parents next week, I am going to bring a jar and collect some wild Goat Holler Rd. yeast. This should be a winner.

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Old 07-13-2011, 03:14 PM   #530
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drummstikk View Post
No, yeast do fine with lactic acid, and citric and acetic. If you add vinegar or lemon juice from a bottle, though, check that it doesn't contain other preservatives, which might inhibit yeast growth.
The RealLemon stuff (and similar brands) has preservatives so you will want to avoid using it. I don't think there is any way to denature them or boil it out.

Generic white vinegar should be distilled vinegar dilluted with water and nothing else. I have used white vinegar in a brett starter with no ill effect. Other forms of vinegar (e.g. unfiltered vinegar, balsamic vinegar and other flavors of vinegar) may have preservatives.
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