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Yeast washing - a followup

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JLem

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In a post a few days ago about yeast washing, I asked a question about what the Yeast Washing Wiki meant by "the part that separated" . I received the following answer"

No. At this point the yeast is still in suspension and the part that is settling out is trub. So you are pouring off the suspended yeast and leaving the trub behind, thus getting only yeast into the new jar.
However, I just read today in The Home Brewer's Answer Book that during yeast washing "...yeast cells will settle to the bottom of the container and dead cells, beer, and trub will separate into the top layer. After these layers have clearly separated, carefully pour off the top layer while not pouring the yeast layer out of the container..."

This is exactly opposite of the previous answer.

Any consensus on which is correct? I'm interested in harvesting my yeast from my latest brew this weekend, but now I'm no longer confident that I know what I should do! :confused:
 
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hammacks

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From my experience (and probably everyone else)-

The trub and dead yeast are much more dense than the healthy yeast and fall out much quicker. All yeast will fall out eventually.
 

flyangler18

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Any consensus on which is correct? :confused:
Both. :D

I find it highly strain-dependent. Some will floc out and sink like a stone, beating the trub to the bottom of the container. What you want is a white, creamy layer as that's the healthy yeast.
 

hammacks

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Both. :D

I find it highly strain-dependent. Some will floc out and sink like a stone, beating the trub to the bottom of the container. What you want is a white, creamy layer as that's the healthy yeast.
wow, I've never seen that. But then again, I've never washed S04
 
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JLem

JLem

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Both. :D

I find it highly strain-dependent. Some will floc out and sink like a stone, beating the trub to the bottom of the container. What you want is a white, creamy layer as that's the healthy yeast.
I have not seen any "white, creamy layer" in the pictures I've seen of yeast washing. Do you have any so I can see what you mean?
 
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