Shorter Fermentation Time with Blow-off Tube

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eurc51

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Hi,

I brewed a Wee Heavy last week using the following recipe:

14 lbs. Simpsons Golden Promise
0.5 lbs. Simpsons Crystal
0.375 lbs. Dingemans Biscuit
0.125 lbs. Simpson's Roasted Barley

I used dry yeast after hydrating it according to the package instructions.

I did a batch sparge and came pretty close to hitting OG. I was about as off the mark as any other beer I've done. Because this was a big bear, I hooked up a blow-off tube right away. The fermentation started within one hour (I could see a few bubbles in my buck of sanitizer at the end of the blow-off tube. The fermentation seemed good - 1-2 inches of yeast cake on top and a lot of activity in the fermentor. The fermentation was strong, but not out of control. I could have gotten away without the blow-off. But, the fermentation stopped after 48 hours. The blow-off tube was on the entire time. I switched to an airlock after it stopped.

So, has anyone else experienced a shorter than normal fermentation period with a blow-off tube? I'm used to three days with an 8 hour delay up front.

Thanks,

Eurc51
 
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This may or may not be related, but I've always used liquid yeast (w/o a starter bc I was a noob) until recently and it always took 4-5 days for the primary to start slowing down. The last few batches I made w/ dry yeast (Safale 04/05) fermented out very quickly. What yeast did you use?
 

ajf

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A blow off tube makes no difference to fermentation time, but it can save a lot of clean-up time.
I doubt that fermentation stopped after 48 hours, but it should certainly slow down by then.

-a.
 

WBC

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Fermentation Temperature (Not room temperature), Gravity, Yeast type all play a part in the fermentation speed. The blow off hose size has no effect. I like to ferment at the lower temperatures the yeast will permit so that the beer does not travel out of the fermenter through the blowoff tube as foam. I loose no beer and keep the flavors in the beer and prevent bacteria from having a chance to multiply at all. The higher fermentation temperature you use, the more esters are produced by the yeast.

Ales:
Nottingham(R) has a wide temperature range for an ale yeast and works well for most ales. I have used it at 60F and get great results.

Lagers:

White Labs WLP830 works well for most lagers and I ferment at 50F using refrigeration and a Ranco(R) controller.
 

JMO

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I've used dry yeast on my last 3 batches and it seems to ferment quicker and more vigorous versus liquid yeast. A starter still kicks off faster but I think the dry yeast, especially the S-04 krausen is usually gone within 48-72hrs. Either way, don't trust the airlock...use your hydrometer.
 
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eurc51

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Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast. Optimum temperature: 57-70° F.

This was the yeast that came with the ingredients kit. Speaking of kits, I'm trying to move away from them since they are expensive, but buying grain by the pound doesn't save much money (at least not at northerbrewer.com). I've seen a few web sites that offer grain in the 25 and 50 pound bags - much cheaper. Have you tried buying grain in bulk? If so, how was your experience?

Thanks,

Eu
 

ajf

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The problem with buying bulk grain on line is the shipping costs. I'm lucky, and can get it for a very reasonable price at my LHBS. The reduced cost of bulk unmilled grain from the LHBS covered the cost of a grain mill within about 6 months.

-a.
 

WBC

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Do some searching for Grain suppliers on the web and just maybe you can find a source within driving distance. Ask any local small brewery if you can buy grain from them? If not then follow up with well then where can I buy bulk grains near here? That is what I have done because shipping really is expensive.
 
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