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BradTheGeek

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I have been extract brewing for 3 years now. I started with big heavy beers (double IPAs, Imp. Stouts...), so I know a ting or two about those.

However, I am a beginner at all grain. I am currently making a cooler mash tun, and thinking about the first beer to brew with it.

I am leaning towards a barrel aged quad. Something that has the layers of complexity that Stickee Monkee has. I don't have a barrel can emulate it pretty well (my imp stout is ages with charred whiskey soaked oak chips). It disappears almost as fast as it is kegged, thanks to friends and co-workers.

However, I wonder if I am setting the bar too high for my first AG brew?
Anyone have some good recipes to study before I dive in?
 
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Personally, I'd go with some simple beers until you get your process down. There is a lot that can go wrong on an AG brew day, so having a simple recipe with a few hop additions will help you focus on everything else. You need to worry about water temps, conversion, boil volumes, stuck sparges, etc...

I'd start with a few pale ales or a blonde ale for your first few batches.
 

mongoose33

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I agree with b-boy. It took me three A-G brews before I got something close to what I was looking for.

It won't take you more than 3 or 4 to get the process down, but IMO it's worth taking it a bit slower here at the start. Brew something you know what it should taste like, and focus on temperature of the mash, and the water profile. Those are the two things I have found matter much more than anything else.
 

kh54s10

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pointcity-homebrew

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I just brewed my first AG batch today. I brewed a simple blonde ale which will end up being an apricot blonde ale.

I agree with getting the process down.

I kept it simple and hit my temps and gravity on the head. My efficiency was 80%, I was stoked.

Sorry if anyone has read this info on another post, I am just excited at how the brew day went.
 

EcuPirate07

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Follow the KISS method for the first couple brews like everyone else has said. I'm still trying to dial in my process, but the beers are getting substantially better. My first was a disaster. I would hate to put that that money in effort into a meh at best beer.
 

oakbarn

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I agree with b-boy. It took me three A-G brews before I got something close to what I was looking for.

It won't take you more than 3 or 4 to get the process down, but IMO it's worth taking it a bit slower here at the start. Brew something you know what it should taste like, and focus on temperature of the mash, and the water profile. Those are the two things I have found matter much more than anything else.
Control the Mash and Have the Right water (and Yeast) and you can do it. Best to have mash about 2 degrees warm on first try as it is much easier to cool than heat Mash. We have gone to HERMS many moons ago but an Igloo cooler keeps the temp very well. If I was shooting for 154, I would aim for 156 and then add a SMALL amount to cool to 155, then close lid and have a cigar!
 

ChelisHubby

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Brad I would go with a stout, try to keep the recipe simple. The strong flavors of a stout can be forgiving, The simpler the better when you first do this. After a couple of successes then add the oak or whatever flavors you care for. If your used to 7 % beers I would still brew something similar. :mug:
 
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BradTheGeek

BradTheGeek

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Most beers I make are 6% to 12%, and lean toward the high end of that scale.

However, I made a simple amber ale for a wedding last year that was really good. I'm going to convert it to AG for my first attempt. See if I can get the numbers right. That should ferment and force carb quick so I can see how I did. Then I can decide on more simple practice or the quad.

I've already decided to use RO water and amend it. My mash tun is a 10 gal igloo, so temp control in theory should be easy. The real test will be volume and efficiency. Hopefully I can hit the numbers.

Thanks for the input!
 

mongoose33

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I forgot to throw this in.

At first, I didn't have a terrific efficiency at all. Then I learned to stir the mash 2 or 3 times during the hour of mashing. Made a big difference.

Same with the sparge. I do batch sparging, it's not quite as efficient in terms of the wort, but it is much more efficient in terms of time.
 

ChelisHubby

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Most beers I make are 6% to 12%, and lean toward the high end of that scale.

However, I made a simple amber ale for a wedding last year that was really good. I'm going to convert it to AG for my first attempt. See if I can get the numbers right. That should ferment and force carb quick so I can see how I did. Then I can decide on more simple practice or the quad.

I've already decided to use RO water and amend it. My mash tun is a 10 gal igloo, so temp control in theory should be easy. The real test will be volume and efficiency. Hopefully I can hit the numbers.

Thanks for the input!
Hey if the amber is good go after the big beers. I haven't tried to do a big beer yet, Tho I did make a 8% by accident. It still is not very good after a year. It was my first all grain and I made several mistakes with volumes.:mug:
 

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