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Blonde Ale Miller Lite (Really Triple Hopped)

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Schlenkerla

Schlenkerla

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Yeah it was glass, but I put it in an old fermenting bucket I no longer use and carried it by that rather than risking the glass slipping. I rarely use the carboy so I never invested in straps or a handle for it.
Buy yourself a milk crate or find an old one in the garage and repurpose it for this activity.
 
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Schlenkerla

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OK. I had some people sample and walk away. There's lots of dark beer drinkers in the club, so keep that in mind. I think the "Miller Ice" that I called it turned some people off right from the start. Whatever, that's what it is.

However, for the first time, I had more than one person ask me for the recipe, which I have never received from the club before.

It was a resounding success. It's not for everyone, but if you're aiming to make a drinkable ale that is dangerous, I can't see it being better than this.

My own personal opinion is this is a very fine recipe. It came out perfect. It being 5.9%" didn't change it in any meaningful way.

Serve it ice cold. And just watch yourself.

I can't see this beer doing well for a competition however, because competition beers are usually judged to certain styles and typically they are "full of flavor" to their respective styles.

This beer just aims to be drinkable, and that's exactly why everyone should probably have some around.

This is an ale beer without mistake, but it's such a VERY light ale that you just want to keep chugging it. I actually decided to stay at my serving table and continue drinking it instead of sampling other beers.
This beer, as an ale, should be in a brut style or a malt liquor maybe. Maybe a brut cream ale. Maybe it best as a hybrid style. I'm of the mindset of making what I like and something for family and friends. In 14 years of brewing, I have never thought to enter a judging competition. That's just me. Take that with a grain of salt. Maybe others have a better category suggestions.

FWIW - I've become that Seinfeld Soup Nazi when it comes to beer and sharing mine with others.
 

pwking

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I've gone all the way through this thread but don't seem to remember if anyone asked this question. Has anyone made this without the corn in the recipe and just upped the 2 row to get the same OG?

I've made a bunch of this beer with the exact recipe but am curious on how much different it would be without the corn addition.
 
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I've gone all the way through this thread but don't seem to remember if anyone asked this question. Has anyone made this without the corn in the recipe and just upped the 2 row to get the same OG?

I've made a bunch of this beer with the exact recipe but am curious on how much different it would be without the corn addition.
The closest thing I made to this was without enzyme. It was a Grätzer. 3 lbs of pilsner and 3 lbs of wheat malt. Then hopped to 40 IBU with saaz. Pitching S-05. The grist was 100% oak smoked. Tasted like light beer and smoked ham. Actually was really good.
 

deVeer

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I just started my 2nd batch a week ago. Instead of corn I used instant rice (I was out of corn meal) Also used pale ale malt instead of standard two row.
Instead of waiting for a week to add the amylase I added it when I pitched the yeast(trying to reduce oxygen by not opening fermenter to add enzyme).
Compared to original recipe and procedure, fermentation was more vigorous and slower to settle down. I will check back in a month or so when ready to drink.
 

Spames

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Boiled 14 gallons with 3oz of Cascade for 60 min, roughly another 3oz of Cascade at flame-out, and topped up with water to achieve 15.5 into my fermenters. Gravity into fermenters was 1.038. It was a spur of the moment kind of brew day, hopefully the 21-22 IBUs doesn't ruin it. Just didn't have the time to really think this brew through and was running back to my BrewSmith software multiple times throughout the day.

15lb 2-row (no 6-row in my store), 6lb flaked maize.

Bubbling away at upper 60's temps within 12 hrs.

I need a larger boiling pot!

2020-05-04.jpeg
 

nickbrew2

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I want to start by saying a big thanks to everyone (especially OP) for providing their input on different variants of this recipe. I was very much looking forward to a light crisp summer ale and this is exactly what I was looking for. I actually went for Cluster as bittering and Saaz as aroma because that's what I had.

Long story short, i've had some efficiency issues recently so I added a couple lbs of base malts hoping to hit close to OG numbers...well I went way over - hit OG of 1.050.

Primary ferm went beautifully at 68F with US-05, im at a point now where I can move to secondary as normal, or add the enzyme.

  • I am at a crossroads of a sweeter beer or potentially a Miller Extra Ice (borrowing terminology from fendersrule) at 6.56% if the enzyme fully ferments out to 1.000. I have a feeling this might have some harsh jet fuel characteristics to it.
  • I've also had mixed experiences with corn in the past so I was a bit worried about skipping the enzyme and waiting for the corn flavor to dissipate naturally over time...
  • My last thought was to rack into secondary on top of the enzyme and extra water to try to dillute down to desired FG...i've read little about adding water after primary but I would imagine it can't be good for yeast and probably has other undesirable effects i'm not aware of.
Just thought I would reach out to see what wisdom you all have. Either way I will be remaking the recipe as written next time, and I know I won't be ending up with what I intended, just trying to make the best of things.
 

Spames

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Boiled 14 gallons with 3oz of Cascade for 60 min, roughly another 3oz of Cascade at flame-out, and topped up with water to achieve 15.5 into my fermenters. Gravity into fermenters was 1.038. ......
It’s still fermenting 13 days later. Very slowly, I might add! I drew a sample and as best I can tell it’s right close to 1.0. I’ve brewed plenty of big beers that were done quicker than this one😎
 

Spames

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I want to start by saying a big thanks to everyone (especially OP) for providing their input on different variants of this recipe. I was very much looking forward to a light crisp summer ale and this is exactly what I was looking for. I actually went for Cluster as bittering and Saaz as aroma because that's what I had.

Long story short, i've had some efficiency issues recently so I added a couple lbs of base malts hoping to hit close to OG numbers...well I went way over - hit OG of 1.050.

Primary ferm went beautifully at 68F with US-05, im at a point now where I can move to secondary as normal, or add the enzyme.

  • I am at a crossroads of a sweeter beer or potentially a Miller Extra Ice (borrowing terminology from fendersrule) at 6.56% if the enzyme fully ferments out to 1.000. I have a feeling this might have some harsh jet fuel characteristics to it.
  • I've also had mixed experiences with corn in the past so I was a bit worried about skipping the enzyme and waiting for the corn flavor to dissipate naturally over time...
  • My last thought was to rack into secondary on top of the enzyme and extra water to try to dillute down to desired FG...i've read little about adding water after primary but I would imagine it can't be good for yeast and probably has other undesirable effects i'm not aware of.
Just thought I would reach out to see what wisdom you all have. Either way I will be remaking the recipe as written next time, and I know I won't be ending up with what I intended, just trying to make the best of things.
If you want a lighter beer, I’d dilute it and add the amalayse, but I’m no expert 🍻
 

Spames

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This is a drinkin’ beer for sure. Been kegged and dry-hopped (2oz cascade, 1oz mt. Hood) for only 4 days, but the “corn sweetness” that many have described and say goes away with time, along with my heavy handed hops gives it the flavor of oranges. Hard to explain, but delightful. Trying to keep my hand off the tap 😆. I believe the haze will go away too, if it lasts that long.

5EA6CE3B-966E-4C61-9ABA-1EAA0A79283C.jpeg
 

DVCNick

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Ok I brewed this mostly according to the original recipe yesterday, just making slight tweaks to try to hit the numbers exactly with my system. I have gone through parts of this thread but not all.
First, this is my lightest grain bill ever in a 5 gal batch. Efficiency went a bit higher than normal and I'm at 1.035 OG. Hopefully that won't change it too much.

I pitched 1/2 tsp gluco with the yeast, which took my one past attempt at a stronger Brut down to 1.000 with no problems so I'm expecting the same here.

One question... since the enzyme is going in anyway, and it is going to 1.000 regardless, is the low, long mash really necessary?

I have a 10 gallon cooler mashtun, so with this low mash volume and long time, I lost about 3 degrees during the course of the mash. Most of the time I only lose about 1 degree. Just wondering if anyone has tried it with the classic 152 for an hour and see how it goes.
 

Brooothru

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It's been a couple of years since I brewed with either Gulo yeast or amyloglucosidase enzyme, but I'll try to relate from memory the steps I took.

First, as you probably know, the glucoamylase enzyme and/or amyloglucosidase work on the 1,4 and 1,6 branches to make those limit dextrins available for conversion to fermentable sugars in the mash. Off the top of my head, I don't remember the active temperature range or the optimum temperature for gluco activity, but it is roughly the same as alpha and beta amylase. Denatures around 175F maybe? Bottom line: more conversion so higher gravity numbers from the mash.

When gluco is added to the fermenter it will further drive the fermentation down to sub-1.000 gravity numbers. The two times I used amyolglucosidaise (both mash and fermenter) my FG numbers were around 0.997~0.998. One was a Brut IPA and the other was a Light Lager, and both turned out super crisp and dry. Also low calorie and low carb.

Fermentation temperatures were around 50F for the lager, so the amylo is active well below alpha/beta ranges. Both beers performed the way I'd hoped, and the Brut won a Blue Ribbon in Category 34 Experimental.

My experience suggests to me that amylo is appropriate for either or both mash and fermentation, but the best way to hit sub-1.000 gravity numbers is to use it in both mash and fermenter.
Mash the way you normally do, but give it adequate time to finish completely in the fermenter before packaging since things slow to a crawl at the end.

Brooo Brother
 

DVCNick

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Thanks.... I'm not a microbiologist or chemist, so some of those fine details go over my head.
I did not add any extra enzyme to the mash. My numbers showed 80% extract efficiency.

My understanding is that the gluco will convert all the non ferementable sugar to fermentable in the fermenter, and therefore it will go to 1.000 with just the ferementer addition of the gluco. This is also what I experienced with my first brut.

This is why I was wondering if a shorter, mid-range mash would work since the longer, lower-temp mashes seem normally intended to get a more fermentable wort. If gluco is going in anyway, it seems you are going to have a fully fermentable wort no matter what.
 

Brooothru

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Thanks.... I'm not a microbiologist or chemist, so some of those fine details go over my head.
I did not add any extra enzyme to the mash. My numbers showed 80% extract efficiency.

My understanding is that the gluco will convert all the non ferementable sugar to fermentable in the fermenter, and therefore it will go to 1.000 with just the ferementer addition of the gluco. This is also what I experienced with my first brut.

This is why I was wondering if a shorter, mid-range mash would work since the longer, lower-temp mashes seem normally intended to get a more fermentable wort. If gluco is going in anyway, it seems you are going to have a fully fermentable wort no matter what.
Not a microbiologist either, just a retired pilot who struggled through aerospace engineering (Calc & chem were NOT my friends, fortunately physics and flying were). 🥴

The simplest explanation that made sense to my simple brain was that amylo drives conversion in the mash by making 1,4 and 1,6 branches available for alpha and beta enzymes to convert to sugars, but gets denatured with mashout and boil, so more must be added to the fermenter where it facilitates any remaining "non-fermentables" to be made available to the yeast for fermentation. How it accomplishes this is PFM* ("Pure ____Magic") to me, but somehow it does.

So, my understanding is that it will definitely increase mash efficiency, thus drier beer with a lower FG, but even then there are unfermentables present. By adding amylo to the fermenter you drive the FG even lower. It's ends up being an "either, or, both" question where the "both" answer results in the lowest FG.

Brooo Brother
 
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