McCann carbonator - new loud noise

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roger55

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My McCann carbonator has been working flawlessly for over 3 years but this week has started to make a really loud noise when it runs. It's really severe and the noise transmits all the way to the output nozzle.
It's still working normally at this point though. Although it has spewed a little water from the backflow preventer valve on the brass carbonator pump.

The brass pump on the front of the carbonator motor is a Procon and I suspect that it might be failing. Since the noise transmits through the whole system, I can't tell if it's originating there but seems like it has to be as I can't figure what else would do this.

Should I get a new Procon pump for it?

Any help will be appreciated.
 

WasserMitGas

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Hi roger,

My McCann carbonator makes a terrible noise if the input pressure is too low, but is fine when the pressure is up. Hope you figure it out!

:mug:
 
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roger55

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Hi roger,
My McCann carbonator makes a terrible noise if the input pressure is too low, but is fine when the pressure is up. Hope you figure it out!
:mug:
Thanks. I just powered it down and will try to find out what's going on.
My input pressure is OK. I can tell that by the way my pressure pump is behaving. But, I just read on the Procon website that there is screen filter on the pump inlet side. So that will be the first think I check.
If it's not that it would have to be the pump itself or the backflow preventer valve (or both?).
 
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roger55

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Looks like I got it fixed.

It was the filter. It was completely plugged with a very thiick milky goo. Not sure whether it was a bacteria or some sludge of some kind that came from a component.

I bought this carbonator 3 1/2 years ago advertised as used but almost new. They said it was used for like a week but then taken out of service and stored for a few years. It looked brand new but just had a little dust so I don't doubt this. But, I didn't check the filter because I didn't know it had one until I started reading to solve this new issue.

Anyway, I've got it back up and running and so far no noise.

The Procon website says to clean this filter every 4 months.
 

WasserMitGas

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Looks like I got it fixed.

It was the filter. It was completely plugged with a very thiick milky goo. Not sure whether it was a bacteria or some sludge of some kind that came from a component.

I bought this carbonator 3 1/2 years ago advertised as used but almost new. They said it was used for like a week but then taken out of service and stored for a few years. It looked brand new but just had a little dust so I don't doubt this. But, I didn't check the filter because I didn't know it had one until I started reading to solve this new issue.

Anyway, I've got it back up and running and so far no noise.

The Procon website says to clean this filter every 4 months.
Glad you got it working, and thanks for sharing that good info! I should probalby check the filter on the carbonator that I recently bought used as well...
 
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roger55

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Glad you got it working, and thanks for sharing that good info! I should probalby check the filter on the carbonator that I recently bought used as well...
No reason not to. It's simple. The hardest part for me was to power it down and de-pressurize everything first.
It's good to have a round bristle brush to clean inside the screen filter. I had one the perfect size for it. You will see once you get it out.
 

Taz420NJ

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When I first started reading it definitely sounded like cavitation in the pump from restricted supply water.. :)

I'd make a strong bet that your slime problem is due to your non-chlorinated spring water supply.. You might consider pulling the whole thing apart and sanitizing it. That screen filter is just supposed to catch particles like rust or sand from an unfiltered supply. Milky slime is not normal.
 
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roger55

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Thanks.
My guess is that you are right.
At this point, I think I will check it again in a few months to see if the filter is collecting any more of the slime.
If it is, I will then consider disinfecting the system.

This is something I thought I wouldn't have to worry about since all the stored water is at refrigerator temperature.
However, the water in the lines at both pumps will get very warm between cycling since this setup is in my garage. I would sure think in the summer that it would average 90 degrees in there at least. I do leave the garage door open for a good long time after pulling a hot car back in though. I'm sure that helps. Pulling in a hot car and immediately shutting the door and I'm sure it would be over 100 in there.

If this does turn out to be the problem, I'd like to figure out how to prevent it from re-occurring. If that's not possible, I guess I'll need to see what intervals would be the most prudent for disinfecting the system. Maybe once a year after the summer heat is over?

Addition Edit:
I just remembered something from when I was very young and worked summers for a business that had a small restaurant. I can recall once when some worker there shut down the soda machine for a complete disinfection. He complaining about the stench made in the area where the carbonator and soda cannisters were when he was disinfecting all the lines.

So, maybe disinfecting is a common maintenance item for any type of carbonation system.
 

piyoman

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Thanks.
My guess is that you are right.
At this point, I think I will check it again in a few months to see if the filter is collecting any more of the slime.
If it is, I will then consider disinfecting the system.

This is something I thought I wouldn't have to worry about since all the stored water is at refrigerator temperature.
However, the water in the lines at both pumps will get very warm between cycling since this setup is in my garage. I would sure think in the summer that it would average 90 degrees in there at least. I do leave the garage door open for a good long time after pulling a hot car back in though. I'm sure that helps. Pulling in a hot car and immediately shutting the door and I'm sure it would be over 100 in there.

If this does turn out to be the problem, I'd like to figure out how to prevent it from re-occurring. If that's not possible, I guess I'll need to see what intervals would be the most prudent for disinfecting the system. Maybe once a year after the summer heat is over?

Addition Edit:
I just remembered something from when I was very young and worked summers for a business that had a small restaurant. I can recall once when some worker there shut down the soda machine for a complete disinfection. He complaining about the stench made in the area where the carbonator and soda cannisters were when he was disinfecting all the lines.

So, maybe disinfecting is a common maintenance item for any type of carbonation system.
Perhaps this would be an opportunity to reconfigure your set up to put the whole carbonator pump, motor(s) and all in the fridge. I was initially considering this but with a mini fridge and wanting a pressure tank supplementing the carbonator tank, there isn't any room. The fridge would also act as noise barrier. If you're worried about the electronics, you could open it up to see about applying some sort of waterproof epoxy in the electronic circuits.

I can't see any harm as you're simply dropping the operating temperature of the components. As long as your fridge isn't open long enough for condensation to occur wouldn't it be considered relatively safe? If anything, just plug it into a GFCI outlet just in case of any leaks from your system.
 
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roger55

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No, I'm not at all wanting to put the motor in the fridge. I don't think that would be a good idea either.

Carbonators are designed to be put in out-the-way places and it has to be common that those places are on the warm side in the summer.

If this recurs, then it is just a matter of maintenance. Not only was this carbonator run a few times when I bought it, it sat for a few years until they put it up for sale. Then on top of that, I get it and run it 3 1/2 years without checking the filter when it's recommended it be done every 4 months.

I will check this filter 4 months and see if I even have a problem or not.
 

BluesBrother

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I'm a bit late to the party on this, I know, but I thought this might be of help to someone. My (new - refurbished) carbonator (purchased on eBay) was making a terrible racket when the pump ran. Eventually, I figured out the problem: I had gone the "cheap" route and used 1/4" refrigerator water/icemaker tubing and a correspondingly-small "saddle valve" to tap into an existing copper water line. I re-plumbed the whole thing using 3/8" ID high pressure hose, with a full-size valve tapped into the water supply. Voila! The pump now runs quietly, as it should. Moral of the story: Don't skimp on the water supply -- use a minimum 3/8" ID tubing tied into a good water source. The pump MUST have an adequate supply of water, or it will run noisy and you risk damaging it.
 
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