Mango Pulp Wine

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kondi

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Sorry for the stupid question, I am from the metric world and I just can't make any sense of the initial ratios.

The recipe says:

8 cups water
30 oz can of Mango Pulp*
6 cups white sugar​

As I understand:
  • 8 cups water = 0.5 gallons = ~1.9 liter
  • 6 cups white sugar = 1200 gram of sugar = ~2.66 pounds
This sugar sounds like an enormous amount for half gallon of water. 2 2/3 pounds of sugar for 1/2 gallon water would result in 1.245 SG, that just can't be right.

I also tried to take into account the pulp too. 30 oz mango pulp = 850 gram. I checked my can and it says 20 gram sugar / 100 gram product, so the 30 oz can has around 170 gram of sugar = ~0.85 pounds. There is probably fiber and other stuff in there, plus water. For the worst case, if I assume that everything else is just water, it would mean that the can has:
  • 0.85 pounds of sugar
  • 2.87 cups of water (850g - 170g = 680g water = 680ml water = 2.87 cups)
So mixing the first three ingredients of the recipe would result:
  • 10.87 cups water = ~0.68 gallon water
  • 3.51 pounds sugar (2.66 + 0.85)
  • SG 1.237
This is still unbelievably high. Especially as NerdyMarie stated the gravity should be around 1.122, which makes much more sense.

Please, could you tell me where is the mistake in my calculation? Probably I misunderstood something, but I have no idea what.
 

Shaddark

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Sorry for the stupid question, I am from the metric world and I just can't make any sense of the initial ratios.

The recipe says:

8 cups water​
30 oz can of Mango Pulp*​
6 cups white sugar​

As I understand:
  • 8 cups water = 0.5 gallons = ~1.9 liter
  • 6 cups white sugar = 1200 gram of sugar = ~2.66 pounds
This sugar sounds like an enormous amount for half gallon of water. 2 2/3 pounds of sugar for 1/2 gallon water would result in 1.245 SG, that just can't be right.

I also tried to take into account the pulp too. 30 oz mango pulp = 850 gram. I checked my can and it says 20 gram sugar / 100 gram product, so the 30 oz can has around 170 gram of sugar = ~0.85 pounds. There is probably fiber and other stuff in there, plus water. For the worst case, if I assume that everything else is just water, it would mean that the can has:
  • 0.85 pounds of sugar
  • 2.87 cups of water (850g - 170g = 680g water = 680ml water = 2.87 cups)
So mixing the first three ingredients of the recipe would result:
  • 10.87 cups water = ~0.68 gallon water
  • 3.51 pounds sugar (2.66 + 0.85)
  • SG 1.237
This is still unbelievably high. Especially as NerdyMarie stated the gravity should be around 1.122, which makes much more sense.

Please, could you tell me where is the mistake in my calculation? Probably I misunderstood something, but I have no idea what.
Hi there from New Zealand, I dont know if you found out what you were looking for with the measurement and quantities but in case not , here is a link for you to look at
I am about to start a US 6 gal batch
 

batman72

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Note: I wrote this recipe out for beginners, so there will be some "duh" to it here!

This wine starts out very orange, thick, and pulpy. It won’t look anything like wine for a few months, as the pulp and yeast slowly settle. When all is said and done, you will be left with a crystal clear, pale, straw colored wine. Sweet, fruity, delicious wine that goes down a little too well… and costs only $1-2/bottle!

Another nice thing about this wine is that it is very good when “young”. Unlike many recipes, this one is tasty and ready to drink in only about 4-5 months! Age it if you like – we haven’t been able to keep any long enough to see how it ages! We just put on a 6 gallon batch of this.

The ABV on this comes out to about 15-16%.

Home Brewed Mango Pulp Wine Recipe

8 cups water
30 oz can of Mango Pulp*
6 cups white sugar
1.5 tsp acid blend
½ tsp pectinase (pectic enzyme)
1 tsp yeast nutrient
1/4 tsp wine tannin
1 packet Red Star “Champagne” yeast

Combine water, mango pulp, and sugar in a large clean, sanitized pot. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until sugar dissolves and mixture comes to a simmer. Remove from heat.

Stir in acid blend, pectic enzyme, yeast nutrient, and wine tannin. Cover pot with sanitized lid, allow to cool to room temperature.

Using sanitized equipment, take a gravity reading. It should be in around the 1.122 area. Keep track of the number!

Using a sanitized funnel, transfer cooled mixture to a sanitized 1 gallon carboy. Sprinkle yeast into carboy, cover with sanitized air lock. Let sit, undisturbed, overnight.

Within 24 hours, you should notice fermentation activity – bubbles in the airlock, carbonation and /or swirling in the wine must. This means you’re good to go! Put the carboy somewhere cool (not cold!), and leave it alone for 2-3 weeks.

After 2-3 weeks, you should notice that the wine has clarified a fair amount, with a thick layer of sediment in the bottom of the carboy. Using sanitized equipment, rack the clarified wine off the sediment, into a clean, freshly sanitized 1 gallon carboy. Cap with sanitized airlock, leave it alone for 2-3 months.

Repeat racking process. Leave wine alone for a month or so.

Using sanitized equipment, rack the wine into clean, sanitized bottles. Cork. (We like to use these for corking our homemade wine. Easy to use – no special equipment needed! – easy to uncork, and – should you have any wine left in your bottle after serving (pfft!), the “cork” is easily replaced for temporary storage!

Enjoy.. and start planning for a larger batch!

* We use Swad Kesar mango pulp, which is readily available in our local grocer’s international foods aisle for about $3/ can. It’s also available at Indian grocery shops and online.

Here is a pic of my Mango wine, I followed this recipe and it is in the final clearing stage after only 14 days, I will however put the pulp in a bag next time, the pulp was really hard to clear, it took several rackings to get it to this stage. it is 1 gallon I am guessing the ABV to be around 14 by taste alone, it was way below the Hydro on final reading.
 

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