Gardening: My Tomatoe and Pepper Progress

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bleme

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i like the compostable weed barrier! We used to use newspaper layered 1/4” thick then till them in at the end of the season. It got too hard to collect enough papers to do the job, but never considered cardboard would do the trick.
It keeps the neighborhood cats from using it as a litterbox too!
 

Deadalus

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I’m trying out this 100 gallon grow bag this year. Hoping it does well.
i like the compostable weed barrier! We used to use newspaper layered 1/4” thick then till them in at the end of the season. It got too hard to collect enough papers to do the job, but never considered cardboard would do the trick.
Had the same problem, it is hard to collect that much newspaper. Then I started using cardboard. I think this contributed to a massive slug infestation though, because slugs like to shelter under cardboard. They were wiping out most of my planted seeds for around 2 years or so until I figured out it was them. It just seemed like I was getting poor germination all the time until I went out at night with a headlamp. It was slug central, so I don't use cardboard anymore.
 

Evilgrin

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Using things like cardboard creates an environment favorable to slugs and possibly anaerobic activity. A breathable fabric weed barrier like Pro-Shield would be better and can last years. Bags of pine bark are fairly cheap and they worked great in my raised bed last year. EZ-Straw worked well in another.

Timberline pine bark is under $4 per 2cuft bag. Their "soil conditioner" is mulched even finer and already composted but much harder to find.
 

bleme

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Good tips on the slugs. I'll put some slug bait out when I get home.
 

Deadalus

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Using things like cardboard creates an environment favorable to slugs and possibly anaerobic activity. A breathable fabric weed barrier like Pro-Shield would be better and can last years. Bags of pine bark are fairly cheap and they worked great in my raised bed last year. EZ-Straw worked well in another.

Timberline pine bark is under $4 per 2cuft bag. Their "soil conditioner" is mulched even finer and already composted but much harder to find.
I was using the cardboard mainly on the tomatoes but I have always used grass clippings too.

Good tips on the slugs. I'll put some slug bait out when I get home.
I try to stick to certified organic controls and there is one for slugs but it didn't work well. Not to say there's anything wrong with whatever you might use but if it doesn't work what I also do is pour a homebrew. Then I bring that out to the garden at night and pick the buggers off my plants and drown them in soapy water. Besides the homebrew, I like to use plastic gloves because it gets kind of gross without them. Oh and if I have any old forgotten bottles or a lousy batch, beer traps work very well and at least they drown happy.

Friends of mine have also recommended chickens and ducks but I don't want any more live animals to take care of than I already have!
 

Hanglow

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I use cardboard over weeds, you need to then cover it either with wood chippings for a path or compost/manure if you are going to grow stuff there. Check out "no dig" gardening for good use of cardboard.

I'm still a good few weeks away from putting my toms out, we just had two nights of frost. I do have onions and second early potatoes in so far.
 

Miller4

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Our first year starting tomatoes and peppers from seed and they are really doing great! Now just trying to be patient enough to not get them in the ground too early. We are trying to have a very substantial garden this year as we have the space. Just got the fence almost finished. Weather has been crazy though, 86f yesterday and was 16f overnight last week. But definitely getting spring and garden fever.
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Dog House Brew

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I have 7 flats of plants in my cold frame. Going down to 26 tonight. We will see what the temp inside is in the am. They have a month to go before planting. Woke up to 3” of snow this morning and it was 40 inside the frame. Need to get my fence built.
 

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New toy. My old 2 cycle would not start so i upgraded to the 4 cycle with a Honda motor. Everyone was sold out of the Honda mini tiller so i got another Mantis.


Jalapeno patch is done. Only needs minor weeding now. Cultivated in some of my compost i started around last July and a coffee can of Chick N Poo. All my coffee grinds and egg shells went in this patch all winter also.



Bean trellis spot converted for some maters. Cultivated in the same mix and a thick compost layer in the back to help keep weeds down.

 

GreenEnvy22

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I've got the garden prepped for the season. I've also planted all the stuff that can handle it is we get a light Frost still (last frost date here is around may 24). Stuff like lettuce, beets, radishes, carrots, onions. Garlic from the fall is doing well too.
Greenhouse tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, and zucchini continuing to do well.
 

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Hanglow

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My chillis and tomatoes. We really have to grow chillies undercover here, some tomatoes can do ok outside but best grown in a green house. So these are my overwintered chillis which I intend to transplant into the greenhouse in a couple of weeks, along with some grown this year from seed that I will probably pot up and grow in my sunroom. Tomatoes are Ailsa Craig and a San Marzano, will try them both inside and outside. Also some summer savory that I should have repotted
 

Miller4

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Well planted maybe half of our tomato plants last night. So of course today there has been 30-40mph winds all afternoon. Hopefully they pull through. Next week is supposed to be in the mid to high 90s so they are getting a good trial by fire.
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catdaddy66

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The healthiest zucchini and squash I've ever planted! Tomato plants and pepper plants got a slow start but after generous watering and application of fertilizer they've looked much better. I've been harvesting squash and zucchini like a sumbitch 😀
 

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jrgtr42

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I had a bunch of tomato plants started, then moving them on, bringing them outside during the day, back at night, they all died on me. |Been a wierd spring for living stuff around here...
I replanted more seeds, have them under a grow lamp. Seem to be going good for a week+ post planting.
I know |I'm late with them, but hoping I can get some growing and producing later on.
 

VApatriot

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For those of you who are having issues with critters intruding on your garden veggies, You might want to look at the link below. I bought a couple VersaNet's and a Patriot P5 energizer kit a few years ago to keep the raccoons from eating my tomatoes. We haven't lost a single one since I started using them. I put them up in the spring and take them down in the fall, lightweight, easy to use and the critters all keep out of my raised beds.

 

Dog House Brew

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I’ve been using Agrabon 19 row covers for my green beans. The shade/frost factor works great for my fall Chinese cabbage as well. 80% light transmission and is wind and rain permeable. Reasonably priced and haven't had any issues with bugs eating the green beans. It has saved the beans from deer also. I’m installing electric fencing next week. Deer have been ridiculous the past few years.
 

applescrap

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I am slowly but surely getting going, everything is setup, entirely auto watered and hoping for the best. Dont have recent pic, but plants are in.
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Planted some seeds but didnt work hard enough there. Next year!
 

GreenEnvy22

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So my peppers haven't really taken off yet. I had to put some cups around them because pill bug (rolly polly) were eating all the leaves. That has stopped now but growth has still been slow. The peppers in buckets are doing better, those are mostly overwintered plants from last year.

Tomatoes are doing great, as are zucchini, potatoes, radishes, beats, and cucumbers.
we have dill coming up EVERYWHERE, will be no shortage of that come pickling season.

I've let 1-2 sunflowers grow in most of the beds as well, those are by far the best growers so far.
 

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Oldskewl

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GreenEnvy22, yours look better than mine. I'm experiencing the same thing. I started everything from seed this year mid-March. Tomatoes and cucumbers are taking off nicely. Overall, my pepper plants are tiny. Only been in the ground shy of 3 weeks.
 

Apple_Jacker

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first attempt at growing tomatillos

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Got some Rutgers tomatoes coming in
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I don't know what I'm doing right, but my squash have taken off in a big way this year. The leaves are as large as dinner plates. One plant had 8 squash on it with more forming. 3 plants may be too many at this rate lol.

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my jalafuego plants are beginning to fruit too.
 

Apple_Jacker

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My cayenne and habanero are still bushing out, but they are starting to show some of the first fruits coming in.

I planted 6 Rutgers tomatoes, 1 Amish paste, 2 San Marzano so far (started these 2 from seed), and 4 Jamestown tomatoes. The Jamestown are a short and small plant; we'll see how well they produce. Only did 1 amish paste and 2 of the san marzano because they really don't like the humidity here. Just testing out different ways to grow and care for it to see if I can get anything off the plants. So far I've been having the best luck with determinate varieties, with the Marzinera's I grew a couple years ago being the exception.

My purple bush beans must have been mislabeled because they are definitely looking like pole beans. My organized garden is going to look like a tangled mess in no time lol.

Cucumbers are about a foot tall so far.
 

bleme

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I can’t believe this gypsy pepper. It’s a tiny little plant, loaded with giant peppers that taste a lot like bell, but sweeter.

The 100 gallon squash container is going like crazy. We are eating squash every day and still giving some away.

The tomatoes are loaded and are finally starting to ripen. I pulled off a shirtfull today but I think I might have to can some of these if they all start ripening at once!

Not pictured is my jalapeño. It’s the only pepper that over-wintered and I’ve never seen anything more pitiful. I think I will just start fresh next year.
 

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Miller4

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We finally got around to planting our peppers. Our tomatoes had a rough start but are starting to come back but are pretty stunted. We feel about 2 weeks behind but it’s nice to see things coming along. Going to maybe try and get some mulch down in the next couple days.
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GreenEnvy22

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Getting peppers now...
Nice haul.
So far I've only got 1 banana pepper ripe. Several thai peppers are close.
The superhot peppers have started flowering and even a couple small peppers on a few of them.

tomatoes are coming along too, nothing ripe yet but several dozen tomatoes of various types on the plants.
We've harvested some cucumbers so far, and zucchini are also about to produce the first good fruit this week.
We've had some volunteer squash form in the walkways between our beds, they are growing like crazy.
 

Oldskewl

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Peppers plants are growing very, very slow this year. We haven't had a lot of hot weather in PA. A couple short hot spells but nothing like normal. Tomato plants are growing but not a lot of flowers/fruit. Lots of flowers on the cucumbers but slow to get any fruit.
 

bleme

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We are looking at 20+ continuous days over 100F and the peppers are loving it - all except the Gypsy. I've never grown this variety before, so maybe it is normal, but it hasn't had any blooms since it filled up with peppers. The existing peppers are ripening steadily and I've been picking when they turn a gorgeous variegated orange, but nothing new.

The Fresnos took a while to get going, but they are booming now. I'm looking forward to fermenting an all yellow pepper sauce!
 
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Staestc

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Well all I did was stick three plants in the ground this year but they are really producing. My habanero is completely covered in fruit and they are huge. I got enough serranos that I already have a jar fermenting for hot sauce. And the Anaheims have just been huge and tasty. Wishing I had planted more now, but just was too swamped with work this spring. This is a typical haul when I pick them.

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