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Fermentation temp disaster

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I'm trying to make a belgian IPA of sorts, and I'm using White Labs Belgian Golden Ale yeast WLP 570. I pitched last night around 10 and thought my fermenter was in a warm place but when I woke up this morning it was at 63-64 F and no fermentation happening.

I decided since it needed to be at 70-75 this was a disaster and I brought it upstairs, put a blanket on it and turned the heat up. When I came back 8 hours later, it is at 80 F! Now I am trying to cool it back to an acceptable level, at least by turning the heat down, but I'm wondering if these wild swings will ruin it.

Now it is bubbling very rapidly by the way.
 

Harvestsmiles

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I think you will be fine. I have done similar things and have not ruined the batch...You will aquire finess with fermenting but that will take practice and every batch will provide new and improved obsticales :) -The real JOY of Homebrewing-!!! You may want to brew when you have a couple days to watch over the brew to help aid in maintaining consistent temps...No Worries Mate! There's always the next batch
 
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Everything I can find about this yeast mentions the optimum temperature range, but I'm curious if anyone can shed light on off flavors produced by too hot ferment temps, or negative effects to the yeast produced by high temps?
 

japhroaig

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I found this a few days ago and will try to find it again, but too hot during the reproductive time for yeast is worse than later. As in they tend to produce more fusel alcohols at the same high temp in the beginning than later in the cycle.

In general, wild swings won't ruin it, especially if you started out colder. In fact, I'd have more confidence in the 'accident' you are describing than say pitching too hot.
 

VTBrewer

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+1 to what japhroaig said, and I'll add a little about Belgian yeasts.

The lower end of the scale tends to create more clove like flavors. The higher end, more banana like. Going from one, to the other, to the middle in 36 hours makes...whatever you have in 4 more weeks. lol.

I think you're fine. I THINK this is the yeast that Jamil starts at 65 and brings to 82 over the first week. But could be wrong. One of the coolest things about this hobby..and a great reason to take notes...is that something like this may be something you want to do EVERY other time you make this beer.
 

Kaz

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Leaving it in a room that was 64 should have been fine. The yeast's fermentation activity would've raised the fermentation temps up to 68-70.
 
OP
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OK - Good to know Kaz. I read that it should start in 5-15 hours. It had been 14 hours with no sign of anything when I turned the heat up, so I was dubious it was going to warm up.
 

japhroaig

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^

+2 what VTBrewer said should be emphasized, measure and record, measure and record, measure and record :D
 

Calder

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OK - Good to know Kaz. I read that it should start in 5-15 hours. It had been 14 hours with no sign of anything when I turned the heat up, so I was dubious it was going to warm up.
Who says it should start in 15 hours. Very much depends if you made a starter, or pitched straight from the vial. If pitching from the vial, how old, how was it kept (by you, by the store, and in transit). If you just pitched the vial, it could take a couple of days if it was old or abused.

80 should not hurt that yeast. We use Belgians for their flavors, and that temp will bring it out. I recently made a Saison with WLP550, started and kept it at 75. Can't wait to see what it turns out like.
 
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Thanks Calder. The White Labs yeast vial itself was what said "fermentation usually begins in 5-15 hours" but that assumed a temp of 70-75, so I probably should just have been more patient.

Didn't use a starter, just followed directions to keep it refrigerated and take it out 3-6 hours before pitching and to shake well.
 

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