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joe6pack

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Is there a very noticeable difference in taste between identical beers made with the same yeast strain, one liquid, one dry?

I know there is more choice in yeast strains with the liquid, but other than that, why is it worth it?

Please enlighten me
 

ifishsum

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No difference, as you said there's just more varieties available in liquid form. I only use liquid yeast when I'm making a style that depends on a certain strain of yeast that's only available as a liquid. 75% or more of the time I use dry yeast, most often Safale US-05.
 

z987k

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if a clean ale yeast is called for it's a dry yeast that is needed. 99% of the time US-05.
 

drayman86

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I
I know there is more choice in yeast strains with the liquid, but other than that, why is it worth it?

Please enlighten me
Seems to be a matter of preference and ease of use. IMHO:

Look at the variety of White Labs yeasts available vs. dry. More varietals = more possibilities. Yeasts have over 500 chemicals they produce during metabolism that can impart flavor, mouthfeel, aroma, accentuate hop bitterness, etc. More types of yeasts that are available form White Labs just allows for greater flexibility and possibilities.

Also, liquid yeasts allow for the preparation of a starter. I never brew w/o a starter from a liquid yeast, and it shows. My lag times are typically 6 hours or less, my beers ferment to completion in less than 3-4 days, and my attenuations are always superb.
 

llazy_llama

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Also, liquid yeasts allow for the preparation of a starter. I never brew w/o a starter from a liquid yeast, and it shows. My lag times are typically 6 hours or less, my beers ferment to completion in less than 3-4 days, and my attenuations are always superb.
You can make a starter with dry yeast also. No one really does, because it's usually easier/faster/cheaper/safer to just pitch 2 packets.
 

double_e5

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2 packets? Hell, I'm too cheap to do that. For a normal gravity beer one is enough. I just rehydrate and pitch.
 

llazy_llama

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Generally in most beers, I do the same. But if your Mr Malty says you need 220 billion yeast cells for your 1.065 RIS, the additional time, effort, risk, and cost associated with making a starter as compared to just pitching two packs of Nottingham just isn't worth it for me.
 

z987k

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You can make a starter with dry yeast also. No one really does, because it's usually easier/faster/cheaper/safer to just pitch 2 packets.
No, no one make a starter with dry yeast, because that would cause an increased lag. The eyast would use up their reserves and there really wouldn't be any advantage whatsoever. You only need 2 packets when you go above 15 gallons(or super high gravity)... at least with the fermentis products. With 5 gallons and dry yeast and a medium to slgihtly highly gravity beer, you really are overpitching.
 

llazy_llama

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With 5 gallons and dry yeast and a medium to slgihtly highly gravity beer, you really are overpitching.
Agreed, but I don't think that's necessarily true with big beers. As we pointed out, for most normal beers a single packet of dry yeast will work best. For something big, a single packet just might not cut it. Also keep in mind that not all dry yeast comes in 11g packets. Several brands are packaged in 5g packets, which certainly wouldn't be ideal for a big beer.

Re-checking Mr Malty, it looks like you need to get the OG up to about 1.090 before two packets of 11g yeast would be viable (Mr Malty recommends 1.5 packets) but 3.4 packets of 5g yeast is the recommendation for the same OG.
 

McKBrew

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If I brew anything over 1.060 and it's not a specialty yeast, I'll dump two packets of Notty. For $1.20 a pop it's still cheaper than a smack pack and DME and it doesn't take two extra days.
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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No, no one make a starter with dry yeast, because that would cause an increased lag. The eyast would use up their reserves and there really wouldn't be any advantage whatsoever. You only need 2 packets when you go above 15 gallons(or super high gravity)... at least with the fermentis products. With 5 gallons and dry yeast and a medium to slgihtly highly gravity beer, you really are overpitching.
This is inaccurate. So is the statement above about only using dry yeast for a clean profile.

If you want to know how much yeast is appropriate, check mr. malty's calculator. Over pitching above his recommendations will not hurt you whereas under pitching may provide an environment for under attenuation or stressed yeast, both leading to off flavors.

If you are using the big 11g packets, one may be sufficient for smaller and some normal gravity 5g batches. For any 10g batch you should at minimum be using two packets and more than likely two per 5g.

Under pitching is a major source of new brewers problems. It leads to all sorts of problems and is simple to remedy. Also, dry yeast in my neck of the woods is around $1 per pack.... too pricey???

I use almost exclusively liquid yeast because I feel I can tailor my beers better and get better results. Many like dry yeast, I just have not been as impressed with the results.

In closing, you should become friends with the search function. There was just a very good thread done about this and other topics.
 

llazy_llama

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If I brew anything over 1.060 and it's not a specialty yeast, I'll dump two packets of Notty. For $1.20 a pop it's still cheaper than a smack pack and DME and it doesn't take two extra days.
Exactly my philosophy. ~$3 for two packets of Nottingham yeast is much better than ~$7 for a smack pack or vial, plus DME, plus the added risk... Overall, I do tend to use liquid yeast and dry yeast equally. Dry yeast for it's simplicity and cost, liquid when I want a specific flavor addition.
 

double_e5

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If you want to know how much yeast is appropriate, check mr. malty's calculator. Over pitching above his recommendations will not hurt you whereas under pitching may provide an environment for under attenuation or stressed yeast, both leading to off flavors.
I disagree. Over pitching can cause some of the same problems you mentioned for under pitching. If you pitch too much yeast they don't go through a complete growth cycle, which can cause under attenuation.

Why not just pitch the right amount of yeast?
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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I agree the correct amount of yeast is fine. However, of all the homebrewing boogiemen, over pitching may be the biggest. I have NEVER heard of anyone having problems from overpitching. The only literature I have seen referencing it is from macro brewers who use MASSIVE amounts of yeast to speed ferment their beers.

If I have a choice between pitching more or less yeast, I always lean to more.
 

double_e5

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Agreed. I just see all these threads of people pitching onto a yeast cake with a 1.050 beer. You hear, "Man, I had blowoff 6 seconds after I pitched it!" Well, no **** Sherlock. You just pitched 9 times more yeast than you needed.
 

Heyyyo

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I'm new to starters, what are the risks that you guys are talking about associated to using them? I assume they can get infected. What else?
 

z987k

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This is inaccurate. So is the statement above about only using dry yeast for a clean profile.

If you want to know how much yeast is appropriate, check mr. malty's calculator. Over pitching above his recommendations will not hurt you whereas under pitching may provide an environment for under attenuation or stressed yeast, both leading to off flavors.

If you are using the big 11g packets, one may be sufficient for smaller and some normal gravity 5g batches. For any 10g batch you should at minimum be using two packets and more than likely two per 5g.

Under pitching is a major source of new brewers problems. It leads to all sorts of problems and is simple to remedy. Also, dry yeast in my neck of the woods is around $1 per pack.... too pricey???

I use almost exclusively liquid yeast because I feel I can tailor my beers better and get better results. Many like dry yeast, I just have not been as impressed with the results.

In closing, you should become friends with the search function. There was just a very good thread done about this and other topics.
1 11g packet is just fine up to 1.060 and 5 gal.

As far as s05 being neutral... it's more neutral than any liquid yeast I've used save 1056... which is the same strain. If you're looking for a very clean profile, why spend $6 on something that cost $1 in a easier to use package.
 
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