coconut extract amounts...

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Hoochin'Fool

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2022
Messages
756
Reaction score
1,317
Location
Minnesota, USA
I've got a chocolatey stout recipe that comes out at 6.8% abv, 45 ibus, slightly roasty, that I add McCormick's Coconut Extract to at a rate of 0.2 oz extract per gallon of beer. It's awesome! Now, I've got an imperialized version of that recipe (11% abv, 70 ibus, a little more roasty) that I would like to add coconut to as well. Should I use the same 0.2 oz extract per gallon of beer? Or maybe bump the extract up proportionally with the abv, to say 0.35 oz extract per gallon?
 
In my experience with similar situations, the answer is usually to increase the addition, but something less than proportionally.

To dial it in, you could dose a sample of the beer (or a similar commercial beer), then scale up to a full batch. I made a cheat sheet back in the day that might help.

1699964702058.png
 
I ended up going with 0.25 oz per gallon for the imperial coconut. Just cracked a bottle to sample, it's been bottled 4 weeks and a couple of days. It's still too young (I regret following advice to add a touch of black patent), but otherwise tasting decent. The coconut is there, but not quite as prominent as I was aiming for. Will check again after Xmas to see if it's improved.
 
This imperial coconut still has a fairly harsh alcohol bite to it (brewed back in October, bottled mid november). BUT, if you have already had one strong-ish drink, and then pop one of these bad boys... it is absolutely fantastic!

Recipe, in case anyone cares:

3 gallon batch, 80% efficiency mini-mash, mash pH: 5.6 (predicted)
OG 1099, FG 1023, ABV 11.0 (alt), IBU 68, SRM 37
Target water profile: London
------------------------------------------------------
3 lbs Briess 2-row
3 lbs Briess Golden Lite DME (@ flameout)
8 oz brown sugar (@ flameout)
12 oz caramel 60L
6 oz briess chocolate 350L
6 oz briess roasted barley 300L
4 oz fawcett pale chocolate 230L
2 oz Briess black malt 500L
2 oz flaked barley
Columbus @60 for 45 ibus
Kent Goldings @15 for 23 ibus
S-04 yeast-cake

Bottling:
add 0.25 oz McCormick Coconut Extract PER GALLON of beer
sugar to prime to 2.7 volumes CO2
EC-1118 yeast (rehydrated per package instructions)

I suspect I didn't really get 68 ibus, because it's not bitter at all... I vaguely recall when lifting out the hops strainer bag that the @20 hops were still partially intact.
 
Last edited:
Thanks for sharing the recipe. I've been on the hunt for a chocolate coconut imperial stout recipe for a while and came across this one that I was considering brewing: Chocolate Coconut Imperial Stout Recipe

A brewery near me releases a few seasonal imperial IPA's around st. patricks day and their chocolate coconut one is fantastic, I ideally would like to replicate that.

@Hoochin'Fool, how is your beer tasting now? Do you think the harsh alcohol bite is from the ABV, or too much coconut extract?
 
@RyPA

Tastes like a boozy, very chocolatey Mounds candy bar. The stout beer drinking fans at our Xmas party refused to believe that there was no actual chocolate/cacao in the beer. I was very happy with the amount of coconut. I should note my measurement of the coconut extract was not actually 0.25 oz (by weight) per gallon, but rather it was a shot-glass (with lines at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.50 ounces) per gallon of beer. Since I had 3 gallons to bottle, I went with filling the shot glass to 0.75 -- if my memory serves, the last time I actually weighed 0.5 "volume oz" of McCormick coconut extract, the scale said it was 0.355 ounces.

If you're hoping to be ready by St Patrick's, maybe reduce the abv by a percent or two? Probably just cutting out the brown sugar would do it. Other than that, I'm planning on brewing this again next week with no recipe changes! Meanwhile, I've still got 12 bottles tucked in the beer closet, and I'm very tempted to sample one right now!
 
@RyPA

Tastes like a boozy, very chocolatey Mounds candy bar. The stout beer drinking fans at our Xmas party refused to believe that there was no actual chocolate/cacao in the beer. I was very happy with the amount of coconut. I should note my measurement of the coconut extract was not actually 0.25 oz (by weight) per gallon, but rather it was a shot-glass (with lines at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.50 ounces) per gallon of beer. Since I had 3 gallons to bottle, I went with filling the shot glass to 0.75 -- if my memory serves, the last time I actually weighed 0.5 "volume oz" of McCormick coconut extract, the scale said it was 0.355 ounces.

If you're hoping to be ready by St Patrick's, maybe reduce the abv by a percent or two? Probably just cutting out the brown sugar would do it. Other than that, I'm planning on brewing this again next week with no recipe changes! Meanwhile, I've still got 12 bottles tucked in the beer closet, and I'm very tempted to sample one right now!
Sounds good. I am going to continue searching around for recipes before I commit to a brew day. I think stout recipes are pretty forgiving given the rich flavor, especially with imperials, so maybe I am overthinking it.

I brewed a stout a year ago with around 2 lbs. of toasted coconut, cacao nibs, and vanilla beans and it did not reflect any of the flavors and I ended up dumping the keg. I am hoping to not repeat that with this batch.
 
I brew the Left Hand Milk Stout clone found here on HBT. I brew it a little stronger (~6.5% rather than the 5.25% the original shoots for, and 4-6% BJCP calls for), so it moves it to a "slightly" Imperial version of a Sweet Stout ;). I add a small amount (1 TBS) of Apex Toasted Coconut extract to the keg prior to racking. I've brewed it twice now with the coconut extract and once without. Turns out quite good either way. I also get that Mounds Bar taste that @Hoochin'Fool mentioned when using the Toasted Coconut flavoring.
 
I brew the Left Hand Milk Stout clone found here on HBT. I brew it a little stronger (~6.5% rather than the 5.25% the original shoots for, and 4-6% BJCP calls for), so it moves it to a "slightly" Imperial version of a Sweet Stout ;). I add a small amount (1 TBS) of Apex Toasted Coconut extract to the keg prior to racking. I've brewed it twice now with the coconut extract and once without. Turns out quite good either way. I also get that Mounds Bar taste that @Hoochin'Fool mentioned when using the Toasted Coconut flavoring.
To be honest, all I am looking for is the flavor and not the imperial ABV. I prefer lower ABV beers personally and make session beers pretty much exclusively -- when I hand out beers to buddies at work they ask "whats the ABV?" and I respond with 5.5 and they seem a little disappointed.

I have tried the Apex toasted coconut flavoring once and didn't have good results.. maybe the batch itself was bad or the amount I added was too little or not enough.

I've read good things about the McCormick coconut flavoring so I am going to try that with this batch.

@BongoYodeler To bump the batch up a few abv, do you just increase malt by X%, or add sugar?
 
To be honest, all I am looking for is the flavor and not the imperial ABV. I prefer lower ABV beers personally and make session beers pretty much exclusively -- when I hand out beers to buddies at work they ask "whats the ABV?" and I respond with 5.5 and they seem a little disappointed.

Seeing as you've been on this website since early 2017, you probably have a couple of good stout/porter recipes. Pick one that isn't overly roasty, bitter, or sweet, pour into a glass, and dose it with coconut extract, one or two drops at a time. @VikeMan posted a handy chart at the top of this thread to help dial in what a couple of drops per beer translates to for the whole batch.

Good luck!
 
@BongoYodeler To bump the batch up a few abv, do you just increase malt by X%, or add sugar?
I went back and looked at my BS3 file. Funny, I did increase the quantities a bit, including strike water, as I usually do, but actually followed the percentages pretty close with a couple differences. I used a slightly lesser percentage of flaked grains just because I was using what I had on hand of those. I also added 1 lb of GNO, to see what they bring to the finished beer. When I input the recipe Beersmith estimated mine coming in at 6.4%, 1.068/1.020, which I hit exactly dead on. The OP's recipe stated 1.062/1.022 which is around 5.25%, hence the difference. I ended up racking a full keg plus two 22 oz. bottles. I also used two pkgs of US-05 since I had quite a few and they were already a couple years old.
 
Seeing as you've been on this website since early 2017, you probably have a couple of good stout/porter recipes. Pick one that isn't overly roasty, bitter, or sweet, pour into a glass, and dose it with coconut extract, one or two drops at a time. @VikeMan posted a handy chart at the top of this thread to help dial in what a couple of drops per beer translates to for the whole batch.

Good luck!
I've been on the site for a while, but was on a hiatus for a good portion of that time.
01/2017 to 04/2017 - I began learning to brew with a Northern Brewer extract kit. I made a few IPA's which succumbed to oxidation, unbeknownst to me. At this time I thought homebrew just did not taste good so I gave up.

09/2021 to Present - I got tired of spending $20 for a 4 pack of brews so I decided to do some research and figure where I previously went wrong with brewing. I began experimenting with water treatments, avoiding oxygen (this was key), and different yeast/hops/malts. I started making beers that tasted like brewery beers and here we are today.

So in my 7 years of tenure, I only brewed for ~3 years. I have only done 2 stout recipes, one is mentioned above and the other is an Irish stout that I've brewed multiple times. I've never done an imperial anything and am looking forward to trying a larger grain bill.

@BongoYodeler I think I am going to brew the recipe that you linked and turn it into an imperial. I plan to add cacao nibs, vanilla beans, and McCormick coconut extract - aiming for a mounds/coconut joy taste.
 
@BongoYodeler I think I am going to brew the recipe that you linked and turn it into an imperial. I plan to add cacao nibs, vanilla beans, and McCormick coconut extract - aiming for a mounds/coconut joy taste.
Sounds really good, it's a great recipe as is or to tweak. I think most any brewing software will allow you to set the desired abv and it will re-calculate the grain amounts to reach that abv.

*One thing to keep in mind, lactose is an unfermentable sugar. Using it will increase both your OG and FG, but it's what makes a milk stout a milk stout. Hmmm, now I want a glass, even though it's only 9am.
 
Looks good. The only thing I personally would change is to up the ibu's a bit. The stronger beer can support a little higher ibu's to keep it from tasting too sweet. My most recent batch (6.4% abv), I upped it to 27 ibu's. At 9+% I would go to 32-35 ibu's to keep it from tasting like a dessert beer. Just a personal preference though.
I think what I am after is a dessert stout. I am not sure that a chocolate/coconut inspired beer would be good with bitterness, but I could be wrong.

This is the beer I am after. Kane Port Omna... and I see it's 35 IBU, so I will take your advice!
3aabc74c64f962485acacbf292ef5ee7_640x640.jpg
 
@BongoYodeler When scaling up a recipe with darker grains, do you have to reduce the increase in dark malts to avoid overpowering/bitter flavors that may come with having too much?

eg. Increasing the 2-row I have no concern with, but increasing the chocolate/roasted barley malt by too much I am afraid will become overpowering, but I have no experience so I am only speculating.

Thanks
 
If your grains aren’t already mixed together you can hold some of those darker/roastier grains until later in the mash. You’ll still get the color benefit but without the harsh flavor.

One thing to keep in mind though, you’ll likely pick up some perceived sweetness from the coconut extract. At least that’s been my experience.
 
If your grains aren’t already mixed together you can hold some of those darker/roastier grains until later in the mash. You’ll still get the color benefit but without the harsh flavor.

One thing to keep in mind though, you’ll likely pick up some perceived sweetness from the coconut extract. At least that’s been my experience.
I always keep my grains in separate bags for the off chance I decide to change something last minute. I wonder if I should just use a higher proportion of 2row and increase the amount of dark malts by a lesser amount, and mash all the full duration.
 
I always keep my grains in separate bags for the off chance I decide to change something last minute. I wonder if I should just use a higher proportion of 2row and increase the amount of dark malts by a lesser amount, and mash all the full duration.
You can certainly do that. It'll be a little different beer obviously, but will probably still make a good beer, The result will also be a beer slightly lighter in color, and a little less roasty. Enough to make a difference compared to the original recipe? You won't know that if you've never brewed the original recipe as written. Remember, the more tweaks you make the further you get from what the actual recipe is supposed to taste like. Not necessarily a bad thing, just a different thing.

My method for most recipes, written by others, that I try brewing the first time: Brew it as close as I can to how it's written. Then, in the future if I feel like tweaking the recipe I have something to compare it to. But of course my method may not be your method, and that's ok, it's what makes this hobby so much fun.
 
My method for most recipes, written by others, that I try brewing the first time: Brew it as close as I can to how it's written. Then, in the future if I feel like tweaking the recipe I have something to compare it to.
That's exactly what I do, too if I can. Except that I'm not going to order a sack of Crisp's maris otter if I've already got a sack of Muntons.
The only thing I might tweak straight away is the yeast as I tend to prefer cleaner yeasts and I chose my yeast according to the weather rather than tie up a whole load of fridges for temperature control.
 
Back
Top