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Airborneguy

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I just got my hands on some sick brewing history. One of my co-worker's wife's grand uncles was a head brewer at a large brewery in NYC in the '30's. He just gave me some of his old notebooks. I'm going to post pictures tomorrow. I just found a few basic recipes, including one for porter. I promise to post pics as soon as I get a chance.
 

Airborneguy

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Here's the "title" on the inside cover. I'm guessing this book was from his classes. My co-worker says he went to a brewing school in Chicago, so I'm guessing Seibel. I've only glanced over it so far, but I did find a few basic recipes with percentages of malt. It's really cool reading a "source document" like this because I've heard so much about the processes and ingredients of the time, but always from secondhand (at least) sources. My friend is going to try to get an exact time frame for this, but we believe it is either during or just after Prohibition. Speaking of, there's a "Temperance Beer" recipe listed which is obviously very low alcohol.

When I get more time, I'll post more pictures and a few of the recipes.

Notebook 1.jpg
 

Airborneguy

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Found this:

An added attraction was the availability of an existing building which had previously been the location of the Wahl-Heinus Institute of Fermentology, a national center for brewing science since the late 1890s which had produced more than a thousand graduates. Prohibition had closed the Wahl-Heinus Institute, but the building was still in good repair, and the cost of fitting it out as a baking school was far less than that required for any of the other proposed locations.
Maybe this is even older than my friend thought and this man attended a different school. I'm hoping he can get me more information soon.

Stout and Porter are described as having taste differences as "opposed to ale," a "greater palate fullness, pronounced malt flavor and darker color." He goes on to state that "It is best to use mixed malts, ie, a mixture of high and low kilned malts. If this cannot be had, we would recommend a mixture of caramel malt and black malt (2lbs and 6lbs per barrel respectively)."

Recommended maltster? Wm. Rahr and Sons of Manitowoc, Wisconsin!
 
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Revvy

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WOW too cool. Do you have a scanner? You should save it to data, an maybe even archive it at one of the brewing history site....and of course post more of it here.

I'm really interested to see if it has any recipes for basic for lack of a better word, "cream" ales, or commons, whatever they would consider a basic non dark ale...Something similar to a lager but with ale yeast. Like a california common, or even like my darker Kentucky common.
 

Airborneguy

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I promise! I'm doing a double tonight, then have to sleep to go back in Saturday night. I'll try to get to this on Sunday. Labor Day weekend is not a holiday for my profession unfortunately. I promise to get to it though. I might be brewing the porter next anyway.
 

unionrdr

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I wanna check this out myself. Pleaase continue when you can. I'd like to come up with a simple recipe for some of youre findings.
 

Airborneguy

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Okay, here we go....

So first off, my co-worker found out that this book is from 1902 when his wife's great-grandfather was in the school that I posted about previously. He went on to be a brewmaster for Schaefer's in Brooklyn, NY. He passed away before the wife was born, so sometime in the 1960's.

So far, here's the style specific sections I've found:
1. American Ales, Porters, and Stout
2. Brilliant Ale (interesting, I've never heard of this anywhere else)
3. Stock Ale
4. Stout and Porter
5. Weiss Beer
6. Common or Steam Beer

Since it seems to be the most requested, here's Section 4 Stout and Porter, verbatim: (This is really tough because its old-school cursive written with a fountain pen!)

Their principal requirements as compared with ale are greater palate-fulness, pronounced malt flavor, and darkness of color. It is best to use mixed malts, ie, a mixture of high and low kilned dried malts. If this cannot be had, we would recommend a mixture of caramel malt and black malt, taking 2lbs of the former and 6lbs of the latter per bbl. Both these malts can be had from the Wm. Rahr's Sons Co. of Manitowoc, Wis.

The mashing method and general treatment of porter and stout is the same as for ale. Hops: Porter 1.25lbs per bbl. Stout 2.5lbs per bbl added in the same manner as to stock ale. Climax Sugar (climax? I'm almost positive that's the word I'm seeing here) to the amount of 25% added in the kettle 30 min before running out. Porter 13 balling strong, stout from 16-18 balling.

Fermentation like stock ale, no dry hopping. Store 3-4 months.

Bottled Goods

Stock beer for bottling (ale or stout) should go through ordinary cask fermentation (secondary fermentation) and after about 3 to 6 months it should be flattened when it is filled in bottles and stored in a warm place from 65º to 70ºF, where it will raise sufficient gas to become brisk again and have a pungent flavor. Beer bottled previous to secondary fermentation becomes too wild in the bottles. The bottle beers are not pasteurized.
 

bottlebomber

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Very cool. It's neat trying to figure out what the heck he's talking about. I wonder if "Climax" may be referring to sugar added at a particular time in the boil. Actually now that I read it again it seems like it may just be calling for a maximum of 25% fermentables from sugar.
 

Airborneguy

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Unfortunately, I cannot find anything more specific regarding stout and porter. I'll post one of the other sections when I get a chance, and hopefully I'll find some other interesting stuff in the meantime.
 

bottlebomber

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Airborneguy said:
Basic Recipe Chart:
Man that's cryptic... And it makes me reflect on how penmanship has changed in the last 100 years.
 

thepartsmancometh

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Fantastic! Thanks for taking the tine to transcribe that. I don't blame you for doing a section at a time, I couldn't read that for long either. Still its very interesting.
:mug:
 

gbx

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Cool! is that the entire recipe chart or is there more on the next page. Is there any detail about the malts or just the gravity and the hopping rates? Its awesome that there is an imperial stout and a Russian export stout with a gravity > 25 (> OG. 1.110!!!!)
 

Airborneguy

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I'll try to do more reading tonight after the kids go to sleep. It seriously hurts to read that for long. My job REQUIRES that all handwriting be done in block letters, so it's been a LOOOONG time since I've read that much cursive. It's weird, but I actually get a headache from it.
 

gbx

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If you post some more pictures I'd be happy to do some of the transcription and I'm sure other people would help too. The picture you posted is ugly by today's standards but quite readable compared to some of these http://barclayperkins.blogspot.ca/2009/09/trumans-log-from-1800.html and Ron Pattinson posts here sometimes as patto1ro. With all the research he has done, he can probably read them as clear as modern typeface:)
 

thepartsmancometh

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Bet you are right, I am reading his book "porter!" and the sheer amount of brewing logs that man has gone through is mind blowing
 

gbx

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Bet you are right, I am reading his book "porter!" and the sheer amount of brewing logs that man has gone through is mind blowing
..I just borrowed porter! from a friend and started going through it..and trying to figure out how I'd brew the 1859 Barclay Perkins imperial brown stout (OG 1.105 and 20+ oz of hops in a 5gal batch) on my system!
 

patto1ro

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That image is interesting. Particularly the reference to Mild Ale. I'm pretty sure that wasn't the usual term in the USA. "Present Use" was more common I think. That table of beers reminded me of something. Eventually I remembered:



It's from An American Handy Book of the Brewing, Malting and Auxiliart Trades by Wahl and Henius, 1902.
 

Airborneguy

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Yup, looks basically the same. The book is definitely from 1902 according to my co-worker. They weren't sure what school he went to, but the first page mentions Wahl, so I'm fairly certain he attended. Again, I promise to get more up whenever I have time. I don't want to put it on my scanner because I'm afraid to damage it.
 

patto1ro

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Yup, looks basically the same. The book is definitely from 1902 according to my co-worker. They weren't sure what school he went to, but the first page mentions Wahl, so I'm fairly certain he attended. Again, I promise to get more up whenever I have time. I don't want to put it on my scanner because I'm afraid to damage it.
If you want any help reading the document, I'd be happy to help. It doesn't look that bad. Especially compared to the Vassar records I'm currently trying to decipher.
 

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Infographic posted on Facebook "Old Images of Philadelphia", 1896 Philadelphia's 54 operating breweries.

 

MaddBaggins

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Whoa! Never saw this thread before. I could spend weeks checking out the links.


Mods, this should be a sticky.
 

ShepFL

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While discussing old ale ingredients on a FB forum I posted a link about Geo. Washington. Revvy responded with this treasure trove of links.

Many thanks sir and wishing you and yours a MERRY CHRISTMAS and healthy, happy NEW YEAR!!

Prost!
 
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