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vk1

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Morning all! I am quite new to brewing- anyone ever tried mixing brews? My latest brew is too malty and sweet for my taste. I want to unbottle it and add it to a newer brew which is still under fermentation. Can I do that- must I add more yeast? It is already carbonated, but has anyone tried this and what has been their experience.
Look forward to hearing about the results!
 

VikeMan

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Lots of people have blended (kegged) beers. Personally, I'm not an advocate of doing it to "fix" a beer. Also, IMO it's never a good idea to re-package beer that's already been bottled. That's a recipe for making an oxidized mess as the beer is agitated and exposed to air. The yeast in the still fermenting beer may use some of the oxygen introduced (depending on the stage of fermentation), but personally I wouldn't risk it.
 

Rob2010SS

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I agree with @VikeMan . Once the beer is packaged and carbonated, there's no way you can fix that without making it worse. When breweries do this on a larger scale, they're blending beers that have been aging and have not been packaged yet.

I'd chalk this up to a learning experience and let it be. I think you'll be thoroughly disappointed in the end product if you try and do this.
 
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IslandLizard

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Agreed, don't add bottled beer to your new batch.

Just finish and package the new beer. Maybe mix the two in your glass(es) at the ratio of choice. As usual, keep pouring until trub start to appear in the neck, don't tilt back before that, so you don't bloom the trub layer.
 
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vk1

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Thank you all for your wise words. I hate waste, so I dont like chucking it all down the drain. But actually I found the bottle I had just now did not taste as bad as the previous one- so because I am such an amateur, each bottle appears to be different. So I will persevere and take it bottle by bottle as it were.
 

Mtrhdltd

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How long has it been bottled? How about cold conditioning? Many beers change slightly with a little age, and some prefer longer aging.
 

Stormcrow

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I'm drinking a batch right now that I really didn't like initially. Still not my favorite, but a little aging has definitely helped it. If you can spare the bottles for awhile, leave it alone for a few weeks and give it another try.
 
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vk1

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How long has it been bottled? How about cold conditioning? Many beers change slightly with a little age, and some prefer longer aging.
It was bottled about a week ago after 2 weeks in 2 ndary term. It is a lager so I cold conditioned it at 6- 10 degrees C. before I bottled it.
 

Beermeister32

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I think we've all tried it once in our brewing infancy. I had an off-flavored batch and I figured I'd blend it away by mixing with a great batch.

I ended up with 2 off flavored batches, and had to suffer my way through 10 gallons of phenolic beer. I should have dumped them, but hey, who dumps beer right?!!

The threshold for off flavors is very low, so you end up still detecting the flaw in both batches. You are well advised not to do it.

If you want to blend, do an individual glassful like a "black and tan" beer straight off the tap or from a couple bottles.
 
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bwible

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There’s an old adage to remember that relates to blending bad beers. (Or wines, or whatever).

“If you put a spoonful of wine in a barrel of sewage, you get sewage. If you put a spoonful of sewage in a barrel of wine, you get sewage.”
 

VikeMan

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The threshold for off flavors is very low, so you end up still detecting the flaw in both batches.
Well, that would depend on the starting level, and the level in the 2nd beer. It's quite possible to blend away an off flavor, but without knowing "how bad is bad," it's a crapshoot.

But anyway, the OPs issue doesn't sound like an off flavor per se. His issue is that it's "too malty and sweet."

You are well advised not to do it.
I agree, for some reasons already stated.

If you want to blend, do an individual glassful like a "black and tan" beer straight off the tap or from a couple bottles.
Always a reasonable option.
 
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vk1

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Ok. It is not off- as I said, its too sweet and not Hoppy enough. But I like the Black and Tan idea the best so far. Thanks
 

dtashmore547

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if it is sweet be careful not to restart the ferment and end up with over carbonated ale or exploding bottles.
 
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I had an imperial stout not fully ferment out, bottled it anyway and it didn’t carbonate either. Even after adding almost 4 types of yeast with high alcohol tolerance.

After a year, I made a new batch, and while it was in full krausen, I added the bottles of half fermented imp stout. 6 months later, it is one of the best beers I have ever had. Sometimes, you just gotta say, WTF and make your move.
 

Nokie

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It was bottled about a week ago after 2 weeks in 2 ndary term. It is a lager so I cold conditioned it at 6- 10 degrees C. before I bottled it.
If I bottle I don’t even try one for 3 weeks. That gives them 2 weeks to carb and 1 to condition. Then try one in another week. Anymore if I bottle I give them a month before I even pop one open
 

IslandLizard

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I had an imperial stout not fully ferment out, bottled it anyway and it didn’t carbonate either. Even after adding almost 4 types of yeast with high alcohol tolerance.

After a year, I made a new batch, and while it was in full krausen, I added the bottles of half fermented imp stout. 6 months later, it is one of the best beers I have ever had. Sometimes, you just gotta say, WTF and make your move.
Excellent, glad it delivered! An anecdotal success of a method gains a lot of merit!

Much more so than adding a mere 2 liter starter at full krausen to a 5 gallon stalled batch, which is usually the advice one would give/get from reading around here.
 
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