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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Food grade Co2?
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Old 03-10-2008, 01:56 PM   #1
unakabrew
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Default Food grade Co2?

I found an older post that touched on this topic but not directly.

How important is it to use food grade Co2 when kegging? I just found a used 20lb Co2 tank from a guy ($70) and was going to take it to the local welding shop and get them to fill it. My wife is concerned about "dirty" Co2 tanks and gas. How big a deal is this?

Thanks

Unakabrew


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Old 03-10-2008, 02:02 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unakabrew
I found an older post that touched on this topic but not directly.

How important is it to use food grade Co2 when kegging? I just found a used 20lb Co2 tank from a guy ($70) and was going to take it to the local welding shop and get them to fill it. My wife is concerned about "dirty" Co2 tanks and gas. How big a deal is this?

Thanks

Unakabrew
None ... I've never had a tank filled with "food-grade" CO2 and have never experienced any negative effects. Same with everyone I know that kegs.


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Old 03-10-2008, 05:56 PM   #3
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From what I can tell reading around on this topic there is not really any difference in the gas itself, it has to do with the cylinder. Supposedly in food applications there is the possibility of backflow into the cylinder when it becomes empty and if it's a regular steel welding cylinder this can cause the interior to rust and contaminate it. So some cylinders are glass-coated on the interior for this reason.
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Old 03-10-2008, 08:08 PM   #4
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Thanks, guys. That's pretty much what I have found in my readings, too.

Since sanitation is so critical in the brew process, and since we go to such great lengths to ensure sanitation, I wanted to be sure I wasn't overlooking anything as I begin kegging.

I picked up my Co2 tank at lunch so I hope to keg some Irish (Sorghum) Stout tonight!

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Old 03-10-2008, 08:27 PM   #5
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Glad someone tossed this out there. I had to switch to a new facility to get my tanks filled. Previous place was a soda/water bottling company that stopped doing walk-ups. I filled up last time from a fireman supply store. I swear that their CO2 is contaminating my beer. 3 kegs now that if I pre-carbed in the holding tank taste wack ( 2 dumpers) which is their CO2 and it tasted fine going into the keg. It's a brand new tank just purchased too. The beer on the kegerator is fine for those beverages I didn't pre-carb (filled by the soda company).

Thought I was nuts and may be but I decided to ask the brewpub owner I know and he says there can be a difference. He's got a masters in geology and used to work at various mining companies out here before getting out of that business. He said they just get the co2 local around here via drilling and contaminants can exist.

Needless to say I'm getting mine filled where he gets his service go forward. Your mileage may vary.
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:22 PM   #6
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All:
There is a HUGE difference in various CO2 QVL's (Quality Verification Levels - there are five).
ISBT (International Society of Beverage Technologists) has CO2 Guidelines for quality - this is what you want. Also CGA G-6.2 QVL I is Beverage Grade CO2 equivalent to ISBT.
"Food Grade" is QVL H. It is technically not Food Grade, it is Food Processing Grade.
Beverage Grade/Quality (ISBT/CGA G-6.2 QVL I) mandates many more impurities be removed that are not even checked in QVL H such as:
Benzene (yes BENZENE), ammonia, phosphine, much lower levels of sulfur and acetaldehyde both of which will affect taste, oil and grease and methanol.
You don't want higher levels of sulfur and acetaldahyde and you sure don't want unchecked benzene levels.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:03 PM   #7
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Well, that's just great. One more thing to worry about.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:28 PM   #8
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Holy old post Batman.
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Old 09-12-2011, 11:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breck09 View Post
Holy old post Batman.
Geez, it is. But if what Mark said is true, I just learned something. I've heard that the welding grade CO2 needs to be pretty pure also, and is food-safe.


By the way Mark, welcome to HomeBrewTalk!
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkNovak View Post
All:
There is a HUGE difference in various CO2 QVL's (Quality Verification Levels - there are five).
ISBT (International Society of Beverage Technologists) has CO2 Guidelines for quality - this is what you want. Also CGA G-6.2 QVL I is Beverage Grade CO2 equivalent to ISBT.
"Food Grade" is QVL H. It is technically not Food Grade, it is Food Processing Grade.
Beverage Grade/Quality (ISBT/CGA G-6.2 QVL I) mandates many more impurities be removed that are not even checked in QVL H such as:
Benzene (yes BENZENE), ammonia, phosphine, much lower levels of sulfur and acetaldehyde both of which will affect taste, oil and grease and methanol.
You don't want higher levels of sulfur and acetaldahyde and you sure don't want unchecked benzene levels.
Damn, good post; bumping this for newcomers


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