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Old 01-31-2008, 04:46 AM   #1
SenorWanderer
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just racked an APA off .75oz crystal and .75oz centennial. i'm brewing another this weekend and i'd like to use these hops for my bittering hops, or maybe as first wort hops. anyone know of a way to calculate there potential IBU contribution. even though no AA was isomerized in the dryhopping, i've got to think that some of those compounds were simply left in the beer and are no longer available. any suggestions or links would be great!

 
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Old 01-31-2008, 04:53 AM   #2
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I have never heard of anybody trying this!
In theory the hops should retain their IBU ratings, but since you dry-hopped they should have very little aroma potential. This is fine because you are looking for the bitterness, not any aroma, so I would say calculate the IBUs by using their normal ratings, just don't expect too much flavor from the addition.
This should, in theory, make sense, however I am no expert and I can't say that it's going to turn out like that.

 
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Old 01-31-2008, 11:19 AM   #3
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Man, that's an interesting idea. In theory I guess the AA components should be intact, but I don't know whether hydrating the hops over a week or so would have a negative effect. The hops are going to be pretty slimey, so there might be a risk that they'd disintegrate in the wort altogether. Though obviously that's unrelated to the question of how effective they'd be for bittering. I'm with Iordz, in that I can't see why you shouldn't calculate IBUs as normal.

Given the hop shortage this is a very intriguing experiment.
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Old 01-31-2008, 11:34 AM   #4
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Since you are dry hopping, and there is no heat, there is no isomerization of the hops, as a result the Alpha Acids are not affected by dry hopping. Ballantine's used to re-use their hops all the time as a cost effective measure. Calculate your IBU's just as you normally would.
I mentioned it here recently.
This will work best with whole flowers as opposed to pellets. BE sure to wash, rinse, land lay them flat in a ziplock bag in the freezer if you are not re-using them immediately. Otherwise simply rinse and throw into your kettle.

A brewery friend and I have been discussing the merits of Hop reclamation and are trying to figure out a way to make it work with pellets.
I guarantee you that some small scale brewers are going to start employing this process considering the present shortage of hops.

Good on you for figuring this out.


 
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Old 01-31-2008, 06:20 PM   #5
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Just this month, a member brought "Three-step IPA" to a OBC meeting. The first one was made with a standard recipe. The second used all of the hops from the first batch for bittering and flavor, only adding new hops for aroma. Ditto the third. He said draining the wort for the last batch was a pain, the hop volume was over a gallon. Same grain bill, but each was distinctive.

This might be easier if the hops for each addition were bagged. Then you could toss the bittering hops each step.

[I'm fairly certain I've got the facts right, but it was a homebrewers meeting.]
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Old 01-31-2008, 11:37 PM   #6
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This is interesting because I just brewed an IPA that I will be dryhopping. I am going to try reuse the leaf hops that are left over (Chinook), too bad I won't be able to get the pellet hops back.

 
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Old 02-01-2008, 12:50 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iordz
This is interesting because I just brewed an IPA that I will be dryhopping. I am going to try reuse the leaf hops that are left over (Chinook), too bad I won't be able to get the pellet hops back.
Dry hopping with Chinook? How does that come out?
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Old 02-01-2008, 05:10 AM   #8
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Amazing, but that's because I love chinook! Try Stone AB, they use chinook throughout the brew, it should give you a good idea of what I am going for.

 
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Old 02-01-2008, 08:46 PM   #9
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I know the alpha acids are not isomerizatized but that does not mean they have stayed in the hops residue. Are we sure that alpha acids are not water soluble? Is it possible that some of the acids have been rinsed out of the hops?

I don't know the answers but I wouldn't expect the wet hops to have full acid values.
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Old 02-02-2008, 12:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBBaron
I don't know the answers but I wouldn't expect the wet hops to have full acid values.
that's what i suspected. i don't think they're water soluble, AA are oily. but, you can't convince me that some of it doesn't simply fall into suspension. the hops are sitting in the bottom of the carboy in the fridge and they're still in a beery solution; i'd say about a quart total. i plan to use them as a first wort hop so i'm going to dump the whole mixture into the kettle as im adding my first runnings.

just a quick note about the chinook discussion taking place in the thread: i was chatting with one of the asst. brewers at boulder beer yesterday and he mentioned that chinook is officially GONE. no mas. anheuser busch bought ALL of it this year, and they've contracted ALL of what will be grown in the next few years. i just hope breweries like stone have existing contracts. i'm glad i have an oz or 2 in the freezer and i plan to use it sparingly. boulder uses (used) chinook in hazed and infused, and they're playing around with a couple substitutes, don't recall names though.

 
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