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Old 02-16-2013, 12:35 PM   #1
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Default How long will yeast live

I have had a stater on my window for about a month. So some UV exposure. How long could you expect these guys to live? Would restarting it be recommended after a point? Would you expect odd flavors?


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Old 02-16-2013, 12:40 PM   #2
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dump it.


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Old 02-16-2013, 12:46 PM   #3
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Yep, dump and start over. A month...did you forget about it?
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Old 02-16-2013, 12:52 PM   #4
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It was my first starter just to practice.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:00 PM   #5
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Starters go in the dark bro. Dump it for sure. To answer the question yeast can live for over a year when chilled near freezing in the dark. When making starters it seems most people pitch within a week. I typically use starters within 3 days while the yeast is still active.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:31 AM   #6
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The yeast will be fine.

You probably want to drain off the liquid and add some more starter wort to get the yeast working again. It will also give you confidence the yeast are fine.

Think about it, bottles can sit for a year at room temperature and still have viable yeast in them. I regularly ferment for 3+ months, and there is still plenty of yeast to carb the bottles.

UV exposure? I've never heard it be a problem for yeast. Yes it can affect some hop compounds and make a beer skunky, but should not be an issue for yeast.
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:45 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
The yeast will be fine.

You probably want to drain off the liquid and add some more starter wort to get the yeast working again. It will also give you confidence the yeast are fine.

Think about it, bottles can sit for a year at room temperature and still have viable yeast in them. I regularly ferment for 3+ months, and there is still plenty of yeast to carb the bottles.

UV exposure? I've never heard it be a problem for yeast. Yes it can affect some hop compounds and make a beer skunky, but should not be an issue for yeast.
Why bother trying to revive a month old starter, and why pitch a crappy starter in good wort? Some yeast may still grow if fresh wort is added, leaving you with a starter of few live cells and a bunch of old trub, or you could just make a new one.

Also, UV exposure most certainly affects yeast.

It would take two clicks to order a fresh tube.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:23 AM   #8
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http://www.ehow.com/list_6375291_eff...ion-yeast.html

Yeast DNA is damaged by UV rays.
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Old 02-23-2013, 02:24 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoHox View Post
Also, UV exposure most certainly affects yeast.
[QUOTE=emyers;4915194Yeast DNA is damaged by UV rays.[/QUOTE]

I can't argue with the referenced link. Maybe they exposed the yeast to high amounts of UV radiation. Yeast survives in the open, it naturally occurs in the open. Natural fermentation of cider is with the yeast from the skins. Natural fermentation of wine is with yeast from the grapes. We capture yeast from the air for 'wild' brews (and a lot of is it sacc yeast).

Maybe high amounts of UV radiation affect yeast, but I think just sitting in the window is not going to do anything to it.

Humans are affected by UV radiation. If we sit too long on the beach catching rays for way too long, we might get skin cancer, but walking about in the open is not considered harmful.

For the OP ... Your yeast will be fine.


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