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Old 10-04-2010, 02:38 PM   #1
lmacmil
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Default Should fermentation stop before going to secondary fermenter?

I brewed an Austin Brewing Bell's Oberon clone (a wheat beer) a week ago Saturday (10 days ago). Fermentation didn't start for 3 or 4 days (and shame on me for not stirring it up after a day or 2). Six days after fermentation started, it's still bubbling away at about 10 bubbles/minute.

The kit instructions say transfer to the secondary after 5-7 days. This will be my first time using a secondary fermenter. Should I wait until the bubbling stops or can I transfer it now and let fermentation continue in the secondary?


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Old 10-04-2010, 02:43 PM   #2
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Don't secondary. You don't need to. Especially with a wheat beer. Wait for all observable yeast activity to stop, then take gravity reading a couple days apart. If equal, bottle.


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Old 10-04-2010, 03:04 PM   #3
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If you do decide to secondary, which few of us do anymore for our regular beers, you really should wait til fermentation is complete, and even a little longer to get some benefit from the yeast's desire to clean up the byproducts of fermentation that lead to off flavors.

Here's some reading for you.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/seco...0/#post1438252

And the discussion here, http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/mult...8/#post1601829

But more importantly this discusses the fact that many folks including jamil and palmer have backed off from that yeast phobia and are embracing long primaries and prolonged yeast contact.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/sec...-weigh-176837/

And you'll find that more and more recipes these days do not advocate moving after 5-7 days (which if you arbitrarily move your beer without a hydrometer reading may only mean 1-2 days of actual fermentation, not LAG TIME which is pretty common. Counting airlock bubbles is idiotic to say the least.) Now more and more recipes even in BYO advocate a minimum of 2 weeks in primary, but nowadays are even says skip secondary leave in primary for 3-4 weeks then bottle.
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Old 10-04-2010, 10:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Counting airlock bubbles is idiotic to say the least.
Wow, I didn't realize a newbie asking a legitimate question would be called an idiot. Please accept my apology for being inexperienced and feel free not to respond to any questions I may ask in the future.
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Old 10-04-2010, 10:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmacmil View Post
Wow, I didn't realize a newbie asking a legitimate question would be called an idiot. Please accept my apology for being inexperienced and feel free not to respond to any questions I may ask in the future.
I didn't call you an idiot, I called the 1-2-3 method, and counting bubbling airlocks idiotic. There is a difference (one is not defined by their action nor by what they eat)....I didn't mean to hurt your feelings....I've posted that exact answer (it's a cut and paste) probably 10,000 times before now and noone's ever felt that they were being called idiots until now.
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Old 10-05-2010, 12:05 AM   #6
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I go to secondary when it's done. By done I mean no off flavors.
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Old 06-15-2015, 12:40 PM   #7
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I have a similar question:

This is my second beer, I brewed a blue moon clone with quite a bit of wheat. Fermentation started about 24-48 hours in and was pretty extensive. I am now at 4 weeks, and I'm getting about 3-5 small bubbles and 1 big bubble within a minute. Has anyone had this happen before? Theres nothing growing or looking bad in the beer. When I look in the fermenter I can see tiny bubbles rising from the bottom to the top. The recipe called for 72 F temp and that what I was at. I read in Palmer's book, that it could be a wild yeast strain? My first gravity was 1.052 and yesterday it was 1.010. I tasted it and it didn't taste bad at all, in fact it was quite tasty. Should I secondary to slow down some fermentation? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 06-15-2015, 01:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Afd1992 View Post
I have a similar question:

This is my second beer, I brewed a blue moon clone with quite a bit of wheat. Fermentation started about 24-48 hours in and was pretty extensive. I am now at 4 weeks, and I'm getting about 3-5 small bubbles and 1 big bubble within a minute. Has anyone had this happen before? Theres nothing growing or looking bad in the beer. When I look in the fermenter I can see tiny bubbles rising from the bottom to the top. The recipe called for 72 F temp and that what I was at. I read in Palmer's book, that it could be a wild yeast strain? My first gravity was 1.052 and yesterday it was 1.010. I tasted it and it didn't taste bad at all, in fact it was quite tasty. Should I secondary to slow down some fermentation? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
The release through the air lock may just be the CO2 produced during the fermentation coming out of solution. Take another SG reading in three days, if it is the same, you are ready to bottle. There is no rush to bottle though. The CO2 coming out of the yeast/trub layer is resuspending sediment and yeast. Your beer will much clearer in the bottle if you leave it in the primary longer.

The beer will clear just as well in the primary as it would in a secondary vessel. Less work to and less chance of introducing an infection.

A fermentation from a wild yeast infection would not be stopped by a transfer to the secondary. The wild yeast would be transferred with the beer. The only way to stop a fermentation would be by heating to pasteurization temperatures to kill the yeast.
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Old 06-15-2015, 01:58 PM   #9
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4 weeks of fermentation

OG 1.052 FG 1.010

The beer is done. Package it. Bottles or keg, your choice.
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Old 06-15-2015, 11:18 PM   #10
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Thanks guys, helps a ton.

Gavin,
Would bottling now, even though it's still fermenting. Cause me to have bottle bombs?

Thanks again.


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