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Old 03-24-2010, 05:20 PM   #21
larrynoz
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Dec 2009
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Quote:
you could swap out the 240v end for a 120v end and run it at a lower wattage... about 1000 watts
How would I do that?



 
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Old 03-24-2010, 05:33 PM   #22
klyph
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Wire the two hot posts with the hot and neutral of a 120v.


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Old 03-24-2010, 05:42 PM   #23
cyberbackpacker
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That heatstick is scary; all it appears to be is an element connected to a 3-prong dryer cord, with heat shrink tubing over the element base.

I have no idea how they expect that to be safe to submerge; maybe there is more to it than that, but the small picture has me "iffy" to say the least.

My .02



Quote:
Originally Posted by larrynoz View Post
Has anyone ever tried one of these: 3500w Heatstick

The price is right but I think it might be overkill for my needs. Again, I'm worried about what my electrical system can handle.

Could I swap out the 3500w heating element for a 1000w one?
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Old 03-24-2010, 05:49 PM   #24
Boerderij_Kabouter
 
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That High Gravity thing is meant to be mounted int he side of a kettle. It is not a heatstick in the context we normally use.

 
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Old 03-26-2010, 01:02 PM   #25
larrynoz
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Thanks to everyone for their responses. I think for the time being I'll stick to perfecting my current method of ~4 gallon boils before moving into bigger batches. I am going to buy another boil kettle though, and either do two separate mashes to get two 3 gallon batches on brew day or maybe experiment with a part-gyle.

Cheers!

 
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Old 03-26-2010, 06:12 PM   #26
RockfordWhite
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Dec 2007
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I use the allied bucket heater for my electric HLT... it does a good job of getting temps 150-170 and it was only 30 bucks...

 
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Old 04-11-2010, 09:24 PM   #27
bovineblitz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockfordWhite View Post
I use the allied bucket heater for my electric HLT... it does a good job of getting temps 150-170 and it was only 30 bucks...
Can you submerge the whole thing, or do you suspend it by its cord or something?

 
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:10 PM   #28
chokeme
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Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larrynoz View Post
First post so go easy. I'm not the DIY kind of guy so I bought a 1000w 120v bucket heater (Marshalltown 742G Bucket Water Heater) but I'm not thrilled with it.

I'm doing ~4 gallon boils on my crappy gas stove top. It doesn't do a good job of keeping a roiling boil. The heating element seems to switch on and off because all of a sudden the wort will boil really good and hard and then die down, then boil really good, the die down etc. I have it plugged into a GFCI thing if that matters.

I would like to be able to do bigger boils on my stovetop so I thought a proper heatstick would be the way to go. Any suggestions?
I just bought one of these, and was examining, when crap came off on my finger (residue from a solder or weld) and I called Allied Precision Industries, the manufacturer, and was told it was probably not OK to use for food-grade stuff - their reasoning being that the weld/solder/whatever was not cleared by USDA or something like that.

Do beer nerds generally think it's safe or probably not?

 
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Old 06-09-2010, 11:59 PM   #29
Catt22
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Jan 2009
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I use one of the Allied bucket heaters to heat water in my HLT. It will bring the water to a boil, but it's not a very strong boil. The rod extending down alongside the heating element is a thermostat probe. It's designed to shut off if the heater should the water level drop too low. The ads claiming 100F or 150F temps are relative to using the heater in an ordinary uninsulated plastic bucket outdoors in colder weather. The heater can't keep up with the heat losses using only a bucket. My HLT is an Ice Cube cooler with foam insulation injected into the lid, so the heat loss is much less. It takes a long time to raise 12 gallons to boiling in this HLT. Usually about 4 hours or so. I have it rigged to a timer and set it up the night before brew day so it's ready when I am. IMO, not enough power to use in a BK, but works very well as I use it in my HLT. I'm on propane for the boil and direct firing the RIMS. The bucket heater is a time saver and I have enough water heated for both the strike and the sparge. The Allied bucket heater cannot be completely submerged. The users guide says to avoid submerging the plastic handle. Fortunately, in my cooler, the guard on the heater keeps the element off the bottom, away from the sides and the plastic handle is just above the maximum water level that I can put in the cooler.

 
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Old 06-10-2010, 12:42 AM   #30
chokeme
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Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catt22 View Post
I use one of the Allied bucket heaters to heat water in my HLT. It will bring the water to a boil, but it's not a very strong boil. The rod extending down alongside the heating element is a thermostat probe. It's designed to shut off if the heater should the water level drop too low. The ads claiming 100F or 150F temps are relative to using the heater in an ordinary uninsulated plastic bucket outdoors in colder weather. The heater can't keep up with the heat losses using only a bucket. My HLT is an Ice Cube cooler with foam insulation injected into the lid, so the heat loss is much less. It takes a long time to raise 12 gallons to boiling in this HLT. Usually about 4 hours or so. I have it rigged to a timer and set it up the night before brew day so it's ready when I am. IMO, not enough power to use in a BK, but works very well as I use it in my HLT. I'm on propane for the boil and direct firing the RIMS. The bucket heater is a time saver and I have enough water heated for both the strike and the sparge. The Allied bucket heater cannot be completely submerged. The users guide says to avoid submerging the plastic handle. Fortunately, in my cooler, the guard on the heater keeps the element off the bottom, away from the sides and the plastic handle is just above the maximum water level that I can put in the cooler.
Hi, did you ever check to make sure it was OK for brewing, meaning, won't leach lead from solder or something like that?

Thanks



 
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