Belgian Dark Strong Ale The Rabbi (pseudo-clone of Avery's The Reverend) -- Belgian Quad - Home Brew Forums
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Old 03-03-2010, 11:32 PM   #1
heywolfie1015
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Aug 2009
Los Angeles, California
Posts: 508
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Recipe Type: All Grain   
Yeast: Wyeast 3787   
Yeast Starter: Most definitely   
Batch Size (Gallons): 5.5   
Original Gravity: 1.092   
Final Gravity: 1.02   
IBU: 21   
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60   
Color: 14 SRM   
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 14 at 68F, moving up to 70's   
Additional Fermentation: Bottle condition as long as you want   
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 21-42 in low 70's   
Tasting Notes: Rich, complex, fruity, and malty. This one is just a fantastic-tasting toe curler.   

Ingredients

14.00 lb Belgian pale
0.25 lb Caramel 40L
0.25 lb Caramel 15L
0.25 lb CaraVienne
0.25 lb CaraPils
0.25 lb Belgian Special "B"

2.00 lb Belgian candi sugar, amber (added 1 lb. at a time during primary fermentation, see below)

Hops

1.3 oz Styrian Golding (60 min.)

Yeast

2L starter of Wyeast 3787. You want to make sure to have a large amount on hand when you pitch.

Process
  • Mash at 149-150 for 90 minutes in order to maximize fermentability and conversion. I listened to an interview with Adam Avery, who swore that they only do single infusion mashes. (If it ain't broke...)
  • Sparge at 170F. I personally batch sparge, but do whatever makes you feel most comfortable.
  • Do not add the candi syrup at the boil. Instead, add 1 lb. 24 hours after pitching, and the final 1 lb. 48 hours after pitching. This will insure that the yeast is not overloaded and will reduce "hot" alcohol flavors.

Notes

I really love this beer. Seriously complex, fruity, and malty, it's the kind of Belgian Strong Ale that makes someone sit up and take notice...and then sit back, relax, and love life. Although this started out as a clone experiment, it morphed slightly into just a darn tasty Quad. Hope you enjoy.

EDIT: the instructions are a little unclear regarding primary fermentation. You should pitch at 68 and keep it there for the first day, but then start ramping up to the 70's and even 80's shortly thereafter. The higher temps are crucial to getting that unique Belgian Quad taste.



Reason: Fixing the instructions a bit.

 
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Old 03-04-2010, 10:08 PM   #2
ColoradoXJ13
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Dec 2006
Somerville, MA
Posts: 1,258
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You have the Avery process right, they start fermentation a little higher though, and let it get pretty warm towards the end, you will get a great yeast flavor from 3787, minimal fusels, and dryer finish that way as well.



 
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Old 03-05-2010, 03:32 PM   #3
heywolfie1015
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Aug 2009
Los Angeles, California
Posts: 508
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoradoXJ13 View Post
You have the Avery process right, they start fermentation a little higher though, and let it get pretty warm towards the end, you will get a great yeast flavor from 3787, minimal fusels, and dryer finish that way as well.
Yeah, I definitely think the next time I make this, it could stand to go into higher temps during primary fermentation. I have to tell you, though, the 68-74 batch I have now tastes pretty amazing, as is.

 
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:48 PM   #4
ColoradoXJ13
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Dec 2006
Somerville, MA
Posts: 1,258
Liked 21 Times on 9 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by heywolfie1015 View Post
Yeah, I definitely think the next time I make this, it could stand to go into higher temps during primary fermentation. I have to tell you, though, the 68-74 batch I have now tastes pretty amazing, as is.
Oh, I don't doubt it, I am a big Avery fanboy

 
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Old 03-08-2010, 10:52 PM   #5
tronnyjenkins
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Feb 2010
Texas
Posts: 97

How much yeast did you actually pitch??
2L as in two liters?!
(noob here!)

 
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Old 03-09-2010, 02:54 PM   #6
heywolfie1015
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Aug 2009
Los Angeles, California
Posts: 508
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tronnyjenkins View Post
How much yeast did you actually pitch??
2L as in two liters?!
(noob here!)
It was a 2L starter, crash cooled before pitching and decanted so only the good stuff at the bottom made its way into the wort. For instructions on how to make a starter, check out Palmer's chapter on the topic.

Also, a solid tool for determining the amount to pitch is Mr. Malty's Pitching Calculator.

Good luck!

 
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:00 PM   #7
tronnyjenkins
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Feb 2010
Texas
Posts: 97

Ohhh. Ok. I was forgetting the crash cool part and just imagining pitching that much starter would change the beer too much.
That makes way more sense.

Do you think any of the dried yeasts would yield a comparable result?
I want to try a really small batch of this.

 
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:14 PM   #8
heywolfie1015
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Aug 2009
Los Angeles, California
Posts: 508
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tronnyjenkins View Post
Do you think any of the dried yeasts would yield a comparable result?
I want to try a really small batch of this.
Honestly, I don't think so. Reason for that is because this beer really derives a large part of its unique flavor from the yeast. If you are going to make a small batch, though, one package of 3787 might do the trick by itself.

 
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Old 04-01-2010, 03:12 AM   #9
shot0rum247
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Feb 2005
Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 250
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Question about that starter calculator. I usually do 1L starters and forget about decanting, never really taste it, especially when brewing fuller bodied ales. Is the # of liters of starter required what they recommend pitching, or would that be the original volume before decanting?

 
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Old 04-01-2010, 02:31 PM   #10
heywolfie1015
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Aug 2009
Los Angeles, California
Posts: 508
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by shot0rum247 View Post
Question about that starter calculator. I usually do 1L starters and forget about decanting, never really taste it, especially when brewing fuller bodied ales. Is the # of liters of starter required what they recommend pitching, or would that be the original volume before decanting?
I always understood that to be the volume before decanting.



 
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