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Old 10-11-2009, 03:18 PM   #1
KingBrianI
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Default All-Grain - Fireside Barleywine

Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: Nottingham
Yeast Starter: no
Batch Size (Gallons): 4
Original Gravity: 1.097
Final Gravity: 1.021
IBU: 104
Boiling Time (Minutes): 150
Color: 20
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 30
Additional Fermentation: Bottle condition as long as possible!
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 30
Tasting Notes: Warm blanket of campfire smoke envelops rich malt and caramel.

Amount Item Type % or IBU
9.00 lb Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 54.55 %
3.00 lb Smoked Malt (9.0 SRM) Grain 18.18 %
2.00 lb Munich Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 12.12 %
0.50 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 3.03 %
0.25 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt -120L (120.0 SRM) Grain 1.52 %
0.25 lb Special B Malt (180.0 SRM) Grain 1.52 %

2.00 oz Newport [9.30 %] (60 min) Hops 86.5 IBU
1.00 oz Fuggles [4.30 %] (20 min) Hops 12.1 IBU
1.00 oz Fuggles [4.30 %] (7 min) Hops 5.4 IBU

1.50 lb Sugar, Table (Sucrose) (1.0 SRM) Sugar 9.09 %

2 Pkgs Nottingham (Danstar #-) Yeast-Ale

I experienced very low efficiency on this beer due to a poor crush. Please adjust base malt amount to hit OG based on your efficiency.

Mash at 150 for 90 minutes. Depending upon your sparge volume, you may not have to boil for 150 minutes like I did to get down to volume, although you do want a fairly long boil to give the beer rich caramel flavors. Add sugar with 10 minutes left in the boil. Ferment at 66 degrees for a month. Rack to secondary and let bulk condition for another month or two. Bottle and let condition for at least 3 months before trying it. Six months is better and a year is perfect.

This was my version of the 999 barleywine. I went English with it instead of American and added the bit of smoked malt for a little more interest. The funny thing about the rauchmalt is that it takes a while to really come through. During the mash and boil, I didn't detect any smoke at all. The wort didn't taste at all smoky. I began to question whether the online store that put my grainbill together forgot to add the rauchmalt (they crushed it poorly so I was already worried). Then after several months in the bottle I began to notice a little smoke right in the background. And every month after the smoke became more pronounced right up to about a year after brewing where it became a big part of the flavor, but in a way that blended with the whole to be perfectly in balance. I describe it as a warm blanket of smoke and it is fitting. The smoke wraps around the palate flowing through the rich malt and caramel and cutting it's sweetness. Tart cherry and dark fruit flavors catch a ride on the smoke to mingle around the palate. It's really a great combination. The firm bitterness keeps the sweetness without either becoming overpowering. This is a beer to sip by the fireside with a good book and a dog at your feet, or to enjoy with powerful meat dishes like steak or game. Just be patient with it and let it age to it's full potential. I thought it was good when young. Well it's great when aged.

This beer took second place in the strong ale category (though it had the same score as the first place beer!) in the 2009 HBT BJCP competition.

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Old 10-11-2009, 03:26 PM   #2
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I was thinking of doing a big beer sometime soon so I could have it ready for next winter. Just by looking at the grain bill of this guy I am thinking it'll be in the running.

I am a little nervous of 3 pounds of smoked malt, but if it worked for you, I am sure it'd work for me.

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Old 10-11-2009, 03:29 PM   #3
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Now is the perfect time to make this beer for next winter. As long as you use beechwood smoked rauchmalt, 3 pounds won't be too much. It is very subtle. Like I said above, it took a while for the smoke to even become noticeable. Just don't accidentally use peat-smoked malt or something, it is muuuch stronger!

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Old 10-12-2009, 07:27 PM   #4
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Just a quick question..... do you use O2 absorbing caps when you age this long? I tend to use them for IPAs and for extended aging to prevent oxidation and flavor stability. Not sure if I'm wasting my time and money.

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Old 10-12-2009, 09:07 PM   #5
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I don't use them because I'm paranoid the oxygen absorbing chemical in the cap will cause off-flavors or something. I'm sure it's an unfounded worry but I stay away from them. I haven't had any bad flavors from oxidation although very subtle sherry-like flavors do show up, which I like and are to style.

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Old 11-10-2010, 01:37 PM   #6
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I'm interested in this recipe but I do not see one key piece of information. What is your boil volume? Talk about bumping an old thread.

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Old 11-10-2010, 01:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzman View Post
I'm interested in this recipe but I do not see one key piece of information. What is your boil volume? Talk about bumping an old thread.
Never worry about bumping a recipe database thread. That's what they're here for after all.

As for boil volume, that will vary widely for each person. I tend to get lots of evaporation with my setup, way higher than most people, so my boil volume will be larger than others. Each person will have to take their boiloff rate into account when figuring out their pre-boil volume. You want to boil this beer for at least 2 hours to develop flavor, but you don't necesarilly need a 150 minute boil like I did. Just adjust the time/volumes based on your system.
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Old 11-10-2010, 05:34 PM   #8
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That makes sense. Thank's much. I have this recipe marked for a future brew, probably before the end of the year.

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Old 11-16-2010, 03:56 PM   #9
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recently at the homebrew store I popped a few Briess cherrywood smoked kernels into my mouth. They were tasty. How do you think that would work in this recipe?

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Old 11-16-2010, 04:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
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recently at the homebrew store I popped a few Briess cherrywood smoked kernels into my mouth. They were tasty. How do you think that would work in this recipe?
I think that would be awesome! If you try it definitely let me know how it works out!
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