Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > DIY Interwoven "Rib-Cage" Immersion Chiller

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-17-2013, 12:24 AM   #231
brewr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5
Likes Given: 3

Default

I probably would of just made a counter flow using garden hose. I did and it's very efficient, chills 10 gallons to around 70-80 as fast as I can drain my kettle.

__________________
brewr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2013, 07:52 AM   #232
troy2000
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
troy2000's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: , California
Posts: 910
Liked 396 Times on 245 Posts
Likes Given: 282

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyo_brews View Post
.

A degree in mechanical engineering should suffice given the number of thermodynamics and heat transport classes I had to take. Although this design is more efficient than a single coil (ie half of the rib cage design) it's efficiency could be vastly improved. The easiest way to do so would be to increase the flow rate of cold water through the coil. Furthermore the most "bang for your buck" would come from splitting the coils and having a t that would send cold water down both both coils instead of routing it down one and up the other. Over all the more surface area you can get with large temp differences the better the design. Hope that helps. As far as the intersection of the coils they in theory would reduce the efficiency of the coils. This is because they will dump heat from the "hot" coil to the cold coil. Reducing the amount of heat that can be absorbed by the cold coil.
Thanks for the post; it's a good one. I'll try to respond point by point - but remember it's my bedtime, I've been into my stash, and I'm coming off another 12-hour shift....

1. Increasing the flow rate is easy; I just open the faucet. And the pre-chiller makes sure the water stays cold.

2. I agree that splitting the coils would create more efficient cooling. But since I cooled five gallons of wort from boiling down to 70 degrees in less than fifteen minutes with no stirring the other day, I'm not sure how much more efficiency I need.

I may do it anyway though, just because it would look even more 'Buck Rogers in the 21st Century' than my present configuration. And after all, I'm doing this mostly for the fun of it. I could afford to buy good beer, if that's all I was after....

3. Do you think heat exchange where the coils cross outweighs the fact that the coils overall are spread through the wort, more than they would be in a single-stack configuration?

One thing: the chiller I made from 40' of 3/8" copper tubing pretty much fills the 7 gallon tamale pot I use for a boil kettle. But I only boil 5 gallon batches in the pot (so far), which means the top few coils aren't cooling anything but air.

I originally thought about lopping off ten or fifteen feet of tubing and using that to make my pre-chiller, and it looks like it would've worked out just fine. On the other hand, someday I may be using a taller boil kettle....
__________________
Joan Sprat went to brewing
A barrel of ale.
She put in some hops,
That it might not turn stale.

But as for the malt
She forgot to put that.
This is sober liquor,
Says little Jack Sprat.
-traditional
troy2000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2013, 06:46 PM   #233
Stealthcruiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta, (Hampton)., Georgia
Posts: 1,322
Liked 113 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 2062

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyo_brews View Post
.

A degree in mechanical engineering should suffice given the number of thermodynamics and heat transport classes I had to take. Although this design is more efficient than a single coil (ie half of the rib cage design) it's efficiency could be vastly improved. The easiest way to do so would be to increase the flow rate of cold water through the coil. Furthermore the most "bang for your buck" would come from splitting the coils and having a t that would send cold water down both both coils instead of routing it down one and up the other. Over all the more surface area you can get with large temp differences the better the design. Hope that helps. As far as the intersection of the coils they in theory would reduce the efficiency of the coils. This is because they will dump heat from the "hot" coil to the cold coil. Reducing the amount of heat that can be absorbed by the cold coil.


No degree whatsoever talking here!..........But if you were dialing in the efficiency of your chiller VS. coolant flow, wouldn't you try to shoot for a minimum spread of temp., ("delta T"), betwixt wort temp. and coolant outlet temp?

Speaking as an Auxiliary Equipment Operator in a power plant for a few years, many times it required DECREASING the flow through the cooler, to get the desired temp on the "cooled medium".......

Was super counter intuitive to me until I saw it in action, where we had to slow down the flow of the coolant, (longer contact time), to get the temp drop where it was needed!

Just throwin' it out there!...........
__________________

Corned Beef............The other pink meat.

Stealthcruiser is offline
troy2000 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2013, 07:14 PM   #234
Thedutchtouch
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 310
Liked 48 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealthcruiser View Post
No degree whatsoever talking here!..........But if you were dialing in the efficiency of your chiller VS. coolant flow, wouldn't you try to shoot for a minimum spread of temp., ("delta T"), betwixt wort temp. and coolant outlet temp?

Speaking as an Auxiliary Equipment Operator in a power plant for a few years, many times it required DECREASING the flow through the cooler, to get the desired temp on the "cooled medium".......

Was super counter intuitive to me until I saw it in action, where we had to slow down the flow of the coolant, (longer contact time), to get the temp drop where it was needed!

Just throwin' it out there!...........

not a mechanical engineer but i am a nerd... for a heat exchanger, the heat energy exchanged is a function of the temperature difference between the wort and the water, as well as the size of the exchanger (in our case, circumference of tube times length). the colder the water is at intake, the faster the wort will be cooled, due to a larger temp difference in source liquids. slowing down the water flow would make the system more efficient relative to heat absorption by the water, meaning each water molecule would pick up more heat from the wort, but for our purposes this is not something we care about- faster water speeds would net a lower water temp throughout the chiller, resulting in higher temperature differential between wort and water, resulting in faster chilling. I would further argue that the shape of the chiller does not matter, as 50 feet of tubing is the same length in any shape, however having the chiller distributed throughout the hot wort will be more efficient, as the cooling is dispersed through more liquid (moving the chiller around in the wort could have the same effect)

clear as mud? or am i mistaken?
__________________
Thedutchtouch is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2013, 12:27 AM   #235
Stealthcruiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta, (Hampton)., Georgia
Posts: 1,322
Liked 113 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 2062

Default

Got it!

Same thing, only different!

__________________

Corned Beef............The other pink meat.

Stealthcruiser is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-17-2014, 12:38 PM   #236
bradford0113
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Warren, Ohio
Posts: 68
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I just recently made an immersion chiller based on this design. I used two 20 foot 3/8" coils and joined them together with a compression fitting so my total length is approximately 40 feet.

I did a test last night and this chiller took 6 gallons of water from boiling to 70 degrees F in exactly 10 minutes. My first time using an immersion chiller and I'm totally impressed!

Up until now, I have only done partial boils on my stove-top and it would always take about a half-hour to take only 2.5 gallons down to pitching temp using and ice bath in a 20 gallon rubbermaid tub.

I'm looking forward to my first full volume boil with my new burner, 10 gallon aluminum kettle, and immersion chiller.

__________________
bradford0113 is offline
Newsman Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-19-2014, 07:15 PM   #237
MindenMan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Carson City, Nv
Posts: 1,418
Liked 196 Times on 151 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Somewhere around here are a couple of pictures of my Frankenchiller. It's ugly, I mistakenly made the two inlets parallel by rolling the same direction, and have two parallel 5/8" x 25' coils. I don't have an accurate time for cooling so the next time I brew, I will. The water goes into both coils at the same time, and leaves at the same time. At first I was worried about a big screw up wasting time and expensive copper tubing. I don't remember where I read it, but the question was raised, "What cools a glass of liquid faster, one ice cube or two?" I now have the "two ice cube" method IC.

__________________
MindenMan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-19-2014, 09:17 PM   #238
jrgtr42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 382
Liked 37 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 434

Default

I made mine last week and brewed with it the next day.
50 feet of 1/2 copper. The first coil went picture perfect, then I realized I needed to feed it through itself to get the other one right.
Ended up with a couple slight kinks, but unwinding and rebending slowly with my bender made it all right. Still slightly pinched near the bottom but doesn't appear to interfere with the flow.
Only other thing is I over estimated the need for uprights, so the tubing is attaching a foot plus over the rim of my kettle. Guess that;s not a problem.
I brewed the next day, and got the wort down to 62 degrees in 15 minutes. EVen though it was about 35 - 40 degrees out, and presuming the ground water was about the same, I wasn;t expecting that kind of efficiency.
I got a hose valve for the chiller end, so I did't have to worry about running to the spigot when I wanted to adjust or turn it off (best idea I had)

__________________
jrgtr42 is offline
Newsman Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-20-2014, 12:23 PM   #239
Newsman
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Cohutta, GA
Posts: 1,044
Liked 135 Times on 112 Posts
Likes Given: 5087

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrgtr42 View Post
I got a hose valve for the chiller end, so I did't have to worry about running to the spigot when I wanted to adjust or turn it off (best idea I had)
I have an immersion chiller I bought that uses a standard female hose fitting. Your idea to use a hose valve makes a LOT of sense... I may have to see if I can't find something like that for my chiller!
__________________
Newsman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-20-2014, 03:29 PM   #240
fartinmartin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: London, UK near Windsor
Posts: 649
Liked 109 Times on 88 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

I put a valve in the input to my cooler, it's the same as normally used for domestic washing machines, it has a 3/4"BSP coupler so the ordinary washing machine hose fits straight onto it.

__________________
fartinmartin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Big Daddy Immersion Chiller (50' x 5/8") Bobby_M DIY Projects 46 12-01-2011 01:04 AM
Is this what you meant by "Immersion chiller?" MikeScott Equipment/Sanitation 9 09-08-2009 05:23 PM
For Sale - Immersion Chiller- 50' 1/2" copper cyberbackpacker For Sale 3 08-20-2009 02:33 PM
50' 1/2" Immersion Chiller - $98 with free shipping @ Morebeer Tankard Equipment/Sanitation 0 05-17-2008 02:15 AM
Does a 1/2" immersion chiller really work better than 3/8"? Tankard Equipment/Sanitation 3 05-11-2008 04:05 PM