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Old 04-07-2013, 07:59 PM   #21
Ventucky805
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Sorry my post got cut off. The "simple hefewiezen" thread.
One of my first non kit beer I brewed. Even after going to grain I still brew it occasionally because its simple good and fast.
5# bavarian wheat dme
8 oz carahell (or crystal 10)
1 oz tetnanger (or hallertauer or other noble hop)
Danstar Munich yeast
Steep grain 20 mins
Bring to boil and add 3# dme and hops
Add the last 2 # dme in the last 10 minutes of boil.
Total boil time 60 mins.
This is for a 3 gallon boil.



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Old 04-08-2013, 01:05 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klowneyy View Post
Ok I just picked up a 5 gal paint strainer and a digital temperature gage
That sounds great. Are you going to make the Dry Irish Stout from Northern Brewer or did you decide on a different recipe?


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Old 04-11-2013, 02:20 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekJ

That sounds great. Are you going to make the Dry Irish Stout from Northern Brewer or did you decide on a different recipe?
I have been playing around with beersmith and I am just going to try and make my own just using 1 lb of black barley grain and 1 lb of chocolate malt grain and use wlp300 yeast
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:27 AM   #24
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I have been playing around with beersmith and I am just going to try and make my own just using 1 lb of black barley grain and 1 lb of chocolate malt grain and use wlp300 yeast
Wow! Good luck! I started by making proven recipes to refine the process. Then once I got my process down I started experimenting with my own recipes. It made it easier to differentiate between process flaws and recipe flaws.

You are quite ambitious. Again, good luck and have fun.
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:44 AM   #25
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6 lbs Pilsen (or Extra Light) DME
4 oz Saaz Hops
1 pkg US-05

If you can't control the temperature of your fermentation, you'll probably not like the result.

1.) Add 6lbs of DME to 2.5 gallons of water and bring to a boil. (Add the DME to the cold water, and slowly raise the temp while stirring until dissolved, then bring to boil.)
2.) At the first sign of boil add 2 oz of Saaz hops and start timing for 60min.
3.) With 15 min. remaining in boil add 1oz of Saaz hops.
4.) With 5 min. remaining in boil add 1oz of Saaz hops.
5.) Cool the mixture (wort) using an ice bath or wort chiller.
6.) Pour wort into sanitized carboy (hops and all, or strain if you feel necessary); top up with cool water until 5.5 gallons are reached.
7.) Pitch yeast into the wort (rehydrate if you wish.)
8.) Wait 4 weeks, keep the carboy cool @ ~65F ambient or less.
9.) Dissolve 2/3 cup corn sugar (dextrose) into 16 oz boiling water.
10.) Dump water/corn sugar into the bottling bucket and siphon the wort onto it.
11.) Bottle the wort. Keep bottles @~70F for 3 weeks.
12.) Enjoy.

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Old 04-11-2013, 02:46 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by klowneyy View Post
I have been playing around with beersmith and I am just going to try and make my own just using 1 lb of black barley grain and 1 lb of chocolate malt grain and use wlp300 yeast
Are you planning to use any base malt? You're not going to get many--make that any--fermentables out of that. Neither of those grains has any diastatic power, which means that they will not be able to convert their starches into sugars. I'm at work right now and don't have access to my copy of Beersmith, but if it's telling you you'll get alcohol with just those ingredients, that's because it simply uses a certain percentage of apparent attenuation to calculate FG (and therefore alcohol).

Also, I would strongly suggest scaling *way* back on the black barley, to about 1-2 ounces for a five-gallon batch. I haven't tried using large quantities of it myself, but everything I've read indicates that much more than a few ounces (in a standard batch) will impart acrid and unpleasantly bitter flavors to the finished product.

I hope this doesn't come across the wrong way, but you may be interested in Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:09 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by latium

Are you planning to use any base malt? You're not going to get many--make that any--fermentables out of that. Neither of those grains has any diastatic power, which means that they will not be able to convert their starches into sugars. I'm at work right now and don't have access to my copy of Beersmith, but if it's telling you you'll get alcohol with just those ingredients, that's because it simply uses a certain percentage of apparent attenuation to calculate FG (and therefore alcohol).

Also, I would strongly suggest scaling *way* back on the black barley, to about 1-2 ounces for a five-gallon batch. I haven't tried using large quantities of it myself, but everything I've read indicates that much more than a few ounces (in a standard batch) will impart acrid and unpleasantly bitter flavors to the finished product.

I hope this doesn't come across the wrong way, but you may be interested in Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.
No not at all I am on here for feedback and to learn. Thank you for your input and I was going to use about 1 lb of sugar as well.
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:18 AM   #28
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Midwest's liberty cream ale extract kit!!! Super easy and tastes great to everyone!!!

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Old 04-11-2013, 03:52 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klowneyy View Post
I have been playing around with beersmith and I am just going to try and make my own just using 1 lb of black barley grain and 1 lb of chocolate malt grain and use wlp300 yeast
Quote:
Originally Posted by klowneyy View Post
No not at all I am on here for feedback and to learn. Thank you for your input and I was going to use about 1 lb of sugar as well.
Okay, I wouldn't do either of these. That's a German hefeweizen yeast - banana and clove, probably not what you want in your stout. Sugar will thin the beer out, also not something I would use in a stout. I agree with others on finding a tried recipe to follow, either the one Derek posted or there are lots in the recipe database on here.

Since you're starting with all grain make sure you read up and understand the mash process. You're not going to have any extract to fall back on so you need to do that correctly to get a fermentable wort. As was mentioned, software isn't always sophisticated enough to alert you to all the potential problems with recipe design.
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:04 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chickypad

Okay, I wouldn't do either of these. That's a German hefeweizen yeast - banana and clove, probably not what you want in your stout. Sugar will thin the beer out, also not something I would use in a stout. I agree with others on finding a tried recipe to follow, either the one Derek posted or there are lots in the recipe database on here.

Since you're starting with all grain make sure you read up and understand the mash process. You're not going to have any extract to fall back on so you need to do that correctly to get a fermentable wort. As was mentioned, software isn't always sophisticated enough to alert you to all the potential problems with recipe design.
Thank you I will do a recipe and thanks for all the information


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