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Old 01-21-2009, 05:36 PM   #1
RyanT
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Default Need advice on a partial mash for this weekend

I am going to be doing a belgian Tripel on a partial mash. here's the recipe i'm going to use:

estimated OG: 1.079
estimated IBU's: 26.9
estimated partial mash to water ratio: 1 quart per lb of grain

6 lb pilsner liquid extract (late addition)
3.5 lb pilsner malt
1 lb wheat malt
1 oz styrian (75 min)
1 oz hallertauer (60 min)
.5 oz styrian (20 min)
1.5 lb clear candi sugar (12.5% of fermentables)
Wyeast Trappist high gravity yeast

1. Yes, I know wheat isn't traditional in Tripels, but I want to put a little in there anyway. I'm trying to go for that Tripel Karmeliet flavor, and there is some wheat in that beer. Do you think 1 lb is about right? Would that overpower the pilsner too much?

2. main problem - what temp, what water volume, and for how long do I mash my pilsner and wheat malts? I was going to use a ratio of 1qt/1lb of grain, mash at 151* for 60 min, but that is only because my two previous partial mash recipes called for similar instructions. Would you recommend any changes to this?

3. how do I create a big, creamy head, as traditional in Tripels? does that just come from a long bottle conditioning period?

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Old 01-21-2009, 06:07 PM   #2
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2. main problem - what temp, what water volume, and for how long do I mash my pilsner and wheat malts? I was going to use a ratio of 1qt/1lb of grain, mash at 151* for 60 min, but that is only because my two previous partial mash recipes called for similar instructions. Would you recommend any changes to this?
You want a triple to be highly fermentable. The extract you're using is likely less fermentable than you can get by mashing, so I'd suggest you mash at 148 for 90 min. in order to get the most fermentability out of your grain. I usually mash at 1.3 qt./lb.

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3. how do I create a big, creamy head, as traditional in Tripels? does that just come from a long bottle conditioning period?
Conditioning will help by giving the CO2 a lot of time to go into solution in the beer. But you mash, yeast pitching rate, and fermentation conditions go a long way toward establishing the foam positive elements that are also needed. Some people feel that adding a lot of protein laden ingredients helps, but if other conditions aren't met that doesn't really do much good. Keep in mind that Duvel has about the best foam of any beer around and it's nothing more than pils malt and sugar.
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Old 01-21-2009, 06:43 PM   #3
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You need to make a yeast starter for that, FYI. Not to insult your intelligence, just making sure you know.

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Old 01-21-2009, 06:56 PM   #4
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I agree on the yeast starter. No offense taken. I need all the help and advice I can get, since this is only my third beer.

I used the web app: Mr Malty Pitching Rate Calculator to determine that i need to make a starter with 4.2 quarts of wort. I am planning on creating the yeast starter on saturday afternoon/evening, then pitching it on sunday afternoon.

Thanks for your other comments.

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Old 01-21-2009, 08:13 PM   #5
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If you do that, you'll end up with a gal. of starter wort in your beer. Personally, I get much better beers by letting the starter ferment out, decanting the spent wort, and pitching only the slurry.

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Old 01-22-2009, 02:19 PM   #6
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If you do that, you'll end up with a gal. of starter wort in your beer. Personally, I get much better beers by letting the starter ferment out, decanting the spent wort, and pitching only the slurry.
very good point! I assume this means that you let your starters go for 2-3 days before pitching?
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Old 01-22-2009, 02:27 PM   #7
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yup and crash cool the starter when you start heating your water(it'll knock the yeast out of suspension and give a more complete flavor profile from the yeast).

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Old 01-23-2009, 07:05 PM   #8
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very good point! I assume this means that you let your starters go for 2-3 days before pitching?
After it ferments out (3-5 day), I put it in the fridge overnight. The old makes the yeast drop to the bottom so it's easy to decant. I don't bring the slurry to room temp before pitching. There's evidence that pitching cold yeast is beneficial.
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