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Old 03-21-2009, 06:53 PM   #11
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yeah i figured... i hoped maybe i could carb it with the yeast and sugar then purge the tank if/when enough CO2 was produced. It's a hefeweizen so i hoped to keg/bottle it sooner but i guess it's safer to wait.
I have done that , and it has worked with most of my corneys but others need to be pressurized to seal up.
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Old 03-22-2009, 05:09 AM   #12
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I have heard that you should use 1/2 the amount that you would if you were bottling but I cant say if that is right or not. I can tell you that I have used the same amount as when bottling and it ended up over carbed.

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Old 03-22-2009, 05:13 AM   #13
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The Beer Recipator - Home

The carbonation calculator on this page gives you the amount of sugar to add for volume, temperature, and beer style.
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Old 03-22-2009, 07:52 AM   #14
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The Beer Recipator - Home

The carbonation calculator on this page gives you the amount of sugar to add for volume, temperature, and beer style.
McK have you tried that calculator? I'm only getting psi for force carbing.
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Old 06-07-2009, 04:12 PM   #15
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The Beer Recipator - Home

The carbonation calculator on this page gives you the amount of sugar to add for volume, temperature, and beer style.
I must be missing something here. As useful as this calculator is it only gives you two options.

Option 1: Calculate the amount of sugar to use IF bottling
Otpion 2: Calc the amount of CO2 to use if kegging

What about Option 3? Priming sugar ratio to cups for kegging? We all know that bottling and kegging use sugar differently.

I've looked through quite a few posts trying to determine the ratio of priming sugar to gallons and how much water to boil the sugar in while boiling the sugar. At best all I can find is arbitrary data...nothing that is based on science.

Unfortunately my LHBS sells the sugar in bags and their instructions call for adding 1/2-2/3 of a bag of their sugar for priming to a keg....great, problem is I have already used some of this bags sugar and I cannot really calculate how much of it I have used in the last few months...for this reason actual measures would be more helpful.

Any ideas?
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Old 06-07-2009, 06:38 PM   #16
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Up until now, I have brewed almost exclusively ales w/ a couple of stouts thrown in. I like to naturally carb. kegs. I use about 1/2 the amount of sugar that I would use for bottling. I use ~3/4 cup to bottle 5 gal. So, between 1/4 & 1/2 cup for kegging. The first couple of times I kegged, I used the same amount of sugar as bottling, and the beers were over carbonated. I typically let my beers set for a min. of a month in secondary and another month in the keg. This also seems to make the sediment cling to the bottom of the vessels and therefore, I get less in my beer except the final pint. Finally, I have been brewing for around 25 years. The methods I use are the ones that I have become comfortable with but not necessarily the best or easiest. I haven't bottled a batch in many years. I have force carbed beers but seem to get more of a creamy head and pin sized effervescence on the naturally carbed ales. Also, to me, the beers taste better after a couple of months aging. These are all just my opinion on bottling/kegging. Now that my sons help me brew, some of each batch will be bottled and we will probably force carb some batches. I'll report back after enough test batches! Luck - Dwain

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Old 06-07-2009, 06:44 PM   #17
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I have just started testing out natural carbing in the keg. With force carbing it takes at least a week for it to force carb in the kegerator. Since I am only set up for one keg in the kegerator, that means a week without beer!

I brew 10 gallon batches, and try to keep all my kegs (10 kegs) full, and keep brewing to keep them filled. So my kegs are usually sitting around for a minimum of 3 weeks (to sometimes months), so having them carb in the keg made sense to me.

Now they only need about 2-3 days in the kegerator to get cold and settle a little bit before they are ready to drink!

From doing some research on the board, I have found that 2.5 ounces per keg is working out nicely.

Regards,
Paul

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Old 06-07-2009, 07:00 PM   #18
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Up until now, I have brewed almost exclusively ales w/ a couple of stouts thrown in. I like to naturally carb. kegs. I use about 1/2 the amount of sugar that I would use for bottling. I use ~3/4 cup to bottle 5 gal. So, between 1/4 & 1/2 cup for kegging. The first couple of times I kegged, I used the same amount of sugar as bottling, and the beers were over carbonated. I typically let my beers set for a min. of a month in secondary and another month in the keg. This also seems to make the sediment cling to the bottom of the vessels and therefore, I get less in my beer except the final pint. Finally, I have been brewing for around 25 years. The methods I use are the ones that I have become comfortable with but not necessarily the best or easiest. I haven't bottled a batch in many years. I have force carbed beers but seem to get more of a creamy head and pin sized effervescence on the naturally carbed ales. Also, to me, the beers taste better after a couple of months aging. These are all just my opinion on bottling/kegging. Now that my sons help me brew, some of each batch will be bottled and we will probably force carb some batches. I'll report back after enough test batches! Luck - Dwain
First off both of you rock, thank you for a concise and very helpful post.

On the subject of force vs sugar carbing I know the large majority of folks are fine with force carbing but in my experience I've noticed that force carbing leaves me a very faint "bubble" compared to a sugar carbed bottle. Don't get me wrong forced carbed ale is indeed carbed, but differently.

I brought this up in a post a few weeks ago when I had compared commercial samples to my homebrew. Everyone could pick out homebrew everytime because it did not have the same CO2 bite that my stuff did. I then kegged and sugar carbed a pale ale, left it alone for a few weeks and now my beer is full of really big robust bubbles that seem to last down to the last drop, but it's not overcarbed. Its the first keg I have been happy with in a year.

I know that force carbing should work but as far as I am concerned there is much more of a learning curve to it than just throwing sugar H2O into the keg. One of these days I'll try to critically evaluate where I am going wrong with it but for the time being the results are obvious to me...may as well stick with it.
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Old 06-08-2009, 01:48 AM   #19
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I typically let my beers set for a min. of a month in secondary and another month in the keg
You're a stronger man than me lad. I can't keep me hands off em.
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Old 06-08-2009, 02:53 AM   #20
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I just tapped my first kegged homebrew - naturally carbonated and conditioned for 2.5 weeks with exactly 1/2 my normal corn sugar amount. Chilled it down to 40, hooked it up then set the pressure at 12psi and pulled a pint. That first pour was only a little cloudy, and carbonation was near perfect. The next two pints were clear as a bell. Likely I'll do my next batches exactly the same way - the results were about as perfect as I could hope for.

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