The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > cask conditioning vs bottle conditioning

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-02-2006, 11:44 PM   #1
D*Bo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North Attleboro, MA
Posts: 459
Default cask conditioning vs bottle conditioning

Well since I got a free keg-o-rator with a couple of bottles (CO2) I figure it's about time to pick up some cornies and start kegging.

So I had a question about conditionoing. There are some beer styles that fare better by bottle conditioning, there are certian flavors that develop from bottle conditioning that keg beer doesn't have. Can you get similar flavors from conditioning in the keg instead of force carbonating?


Thanks,
D*Bo

__________________
PrimaryBaltica 9
Secondary British all Amarillo IPA, Calypso
Conditioning Decoction maddness, FlyingJess Ale
Drinking Oatmeal Chocolate Stout, Oaked Bourbon Chocolate Stout, Dry Mead)
Up NextScottish ale and Dopple Bock

Always ready for the wack snack attack, I carry sandwiches around in a straight edge style JanSports backpack.

Support your local businesses
D*Bo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-03-2006, 06:58 PM   #2
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

yep - a corny is just one huge bottle, if you treat it as such.

__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2006, 01:34 AM   #3
bikebryan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 556
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
yep - a corny is just one huge bottle, if you treat it as such.
With one BBIIGG difference - you still need a CO2 source. Why?

Cornies are notorious for their lids not sealing unless you pressurize the keg. If you just prime, rack to the keg and place the lid, in a few weeks you'll have a keg with lots of sediment in the bottom and no carbonation, as it will all leak out of the lid.

To seal the keg after racking, you really should hook up a CO2 source and pressurize it. That way the lid will seal. At that point you can let the beer condition naturally it that's what you desire. I've experimented with a big batch, cask conditioning half and force carbonating the other half. I couldn't tell the difference, nor could any of my friends. The difference I COULD tell was that it was more work priming, just to get those first few draws of nasty sediment filled beer. Hardly scientific, I know, but there you go.
__________________
bikebryan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2006, 10:49 AM   #4
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 97 Times on 91 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Why do you need a CO2 source? To dispense the beer. Natural carbonation generates enough pressure to dispense some fo the beer, but not the whole 5 gallons.
Many people cut off the bottom 1/2" or so of the dispensing tube. This makes it impossible to dispense the last cup of beer from the keg, but you more than make up for that small loss by drawing clear beer from the first pint.

-a.

__________________
ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2006, 11:52 AM   #5
wild
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Surprise, AZ.
Posts: 1,496
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I think bikebryan is referring to the use of CO2 to seal the keg. Some people have kegs that don't seal properly (I have 2 myself) and need about 10# of pressure to put a proper seal on the keg. Once the keg has sealed, the majority of the pressure can be released.

Wild
__________________
On Tap -
  1. 3 year old Oak Aged Bourbon Porter
  2. Irish Red Rye
  3. Robust Porter
  4. Russian Imperial Stout
  5. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Citra
  6. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Centennial
Primary - Nada
Secondary -
From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world. -- Saint Arnoldus
wild is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2006, 12:53 PM   #6
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

My kegs all seal without the aid of CO2. If you have a good fitting lid and a keg in good condition, they should seal properly.

And you can dispense without the use of Co2 - it is called a beer engine! See this thread . . . http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=10529

__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2006, 01:05 PM   #7
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,648
Liked 131 Times on 124 Posts

Default

I've never had sealing problems either (7 years and 13 cornies). sonvolt is dead on though, a cornie is just a big bottle. Unless one of those bottle conditioned flavors are a hint of skunk. I guess you couldn't make Corona in a cornie.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle Conditioning vs Carboy Conditioning. What's the difference? BrewOnBoard Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 12-13-2008 06:21 AM
Cask Conditioning Slappy White General Techniques 9 04-17-2008 10:18 PM
simulate cask conditioning? musikguru6 Recipes/Ingredients 12 10-16-2007 05:16 PM
Cask Conditioning Gilbey General Techniques 24 09-24-2005 10:14 PM
Cask conditioning redear Bottling/Kegging 4 03-23-2005 11:32 PM