*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Bottle Priming: temp to use for calcs after cold crashing
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-09-2009, 11:40 PM   #1
BackAlleyBrewingCo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toledo, OH
Posts: 86
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default Bottle Priming: temp to use for calcs after cold crashing

Hi all,

I've got a Saison that's been sitting in a keg at room temperature w/ no carbonation for a week, after being in primary for 4 weeks. I'd like to cold crash it for a couple of days for clearing, then prime and bottle it. The charts, equations, and online calculators all take into account the temperature of the beer to correct for residual carbonation. My question is: should I use the cold crash temp in the calcs, where the beer will have been for a short time when I go to bottle it, or should I use the temp that the beer was at when fermentation completed? The temp delta makes a significant difference in the amount of priming sugar.

I guess a third option would be to allow the beer to come back up to room temp and sit a few days after crashing to remove all doubt.

What do you think?

__________________
BackAlleyBrewingCo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-10-2009, 12:23 AM   #2
HairyDogBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 580
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I think use the fermentation temperature.
There won't be enough CO2 produced during cold crashing to reach saturation for the lower temperature.

__________________
HairyDogBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-13-2009, 03:39 PM   #3
thelorax121
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Athens GA
Posts: 419
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I have the same question actually, can anyone clarify?

__________________
thelorax121 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-13-2009, 05:14 PM   #4
HairyDogBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 580
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Say you have 2 batches to bottle and you want both to have 2.5 volumes CO2.
One is an ale that has fermented out at 70F,
the other is a lager that has fermented out at 50F.
Since the ale is warmer, more CO2 escaped out of the airlock.
So you would need 4.5 ounces of corn sugar versus 3.5 ounces for the lager.

Cold crashing doesn't magically create more CO2.
The ale will still need 4.5 ounces after spending a day in the fridge.

__________________
HairyDogBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2009, 04:41 PM   #5
thelorax121
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Athens GA
Posts: 419
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Gotcha, that's what I figured, but I wanted to be sure. Thanks Hairy

__________________
thelorax121 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2009, 04:49 PM   #6
rsmith179
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 973
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

If you are bottle conditioning your beer, you will not want it at 50F anyways. I'm not quite sure what charts you're looking at, but they may have to do with kegging (force carbing) your batch. Different temps will require different pressures to get to the desired carbing levels when force carbing.

If you are bottle conditioning though, all priming sugar measurements are based off of temps right around 70F. There is no way the bottles would carb if you stored them at 50F, unless you were using lager yeast strains.

Also, it does not matter what temperature your beers FERMENTED at. All that matters is what temperature you're bottle conditioning your beer at. Just because you cold crashed one batch and didn't do that to another on does not mean that you need two different amounts of priming sugar. The conditioning temperature is what matters. After you cold crash your beer and rack to the bottling bucket, BOTH batches will be primed and stored at the same temperature.

__________________

"Brewers enjoy working to make beer as much as drinking beer instead of working."
-Harold Rudolph

rsmith179 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2009, 05:00 PM   #7
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2734 Times on 1640 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Are you referring to the carbonation level based on beer temps calculations? Like Palmer's monograph, or the calculator in most software like beersmith?

IF so you calculate it based on the temp of your beer at bottling time. You take the temp, calculate the amount of sugar water you need and bottle as normal...

But honestly most of us who cold crash just let the beer return to room temp and add the usual amount. It's easier that way.....Just pull the beer out of the fridge the night before you plan to bottle, and it will be ready to go when you are the next day.

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2009, 09:40 PM   #8
Malticulous
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: St. George Utah
Posts: 4,126
Liked 56 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Use the highest temp the beer ever was after fermenting. Lowering the temp will not produce any more C02 but raising the temp will gas some off.

__________________

Last edited by Malticulous; 07-14-2009 at 09:44 PM.
Malticulous is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-30-2009, 02:42 AM   #9
StoneHands
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 435
Liked 31 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Sorry to resurrect a slightly old thread, but I wanted to clarify for my situation. I have a lager that I fermented at 50 and am now lagering at 32. I did not do a d-rest, the highest temp it's gotten to is probably about 55 when I transferred to the lagering vessel. If I understand things, I agree with Revvy above - as long as the bottling temperature is the highest temp that it's been. I would like to bottle this in a week or two. Should I:
1. Bulk prime by transferring right out of the lagering vessel into a bottling bucket and use the nomograph for 55 degrees, assuming it won't get over this temp when I bottle? (it might)
or
2. Let the beer warm up to room temp overnight and use this as my temp, bulk prime and bottle. I know this will allow some of the CO2 in solution to leave, requiring more priming sugar.

My point is to not save priming sugar, it's cheap. I just want the proper carbonation in my beer and I wanted to see what others do. I may be a rarity, bulk priming and bottling a lager. I'd be willing to bet most keg.

__________________
StoneHands is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2012, 02:32 PM   #10
trey23
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 7
Default

Is 55 degrees to low of a temp to rack into my bottling bucket? I have everything prepped and ready to go????? I need to start reading ahead of time.I am brewing True brew Pale Ale with Muntons Ale yeast.

__________________
trey23 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The effects of cold crashing on priming sugar needs AnOldUR Brew Science 55 06-25-2013 07:02 PM
Cold crashing my carboy - temp to bottle at? Ksosh General Techniques 2 10-26-2009 11:28 PM
Been cold crashing my beer...what temp to bottle at? Q2XL General Beer Discussion 11 08-07-2009 09:57 PM
Cold crashing in the bottle scopey General Techniques 15 04-30-2009 02:15 PM
Cold crashing and then bottle conditioning? willangus Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 03-13-2009 09:56 PM