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Old 02-25-2014, 07:36 PM   #1
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Default Pitch dry yeast 5 hours after hydrating

I'm going to brew a simple pale ale tonight and I'm going to try something different. I use US05 and BRY-97 quite a bit and I've had great success with both. The problem I've struggled with is timing the water temp, rehydration time, and getting the yeast attemperated.
Tonight I'm going to rehydrate the yeast during the mash and just let it sit at room until I'm ready to pitch about 5 hours later, which takes care of all those issues.
I've read that it doesn't hurt the yeast to sit around for a while, you just lose the benefit of all the goodness built in to the yeast cells during the drying process.
Just wondering if anybody has tried this and how it turned out?

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Old 02-25-2014, 07:43 PM   #2
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There is some literature to suggest that you should rehydrate not much more than 30 minutes before pitching. This is because certain energy reserves (glycogen) within the dried yeast are consumed as the yeast rehydrates in water - which is obviously devoid of any source of energy for the yeast.

This probably isn't a hard-and-fast number, and certainly people will disagree with it, but you should aim to incorporate it into your schedule. I know things can be pandemonium on some brewdays but you soon find a rhythm, avoiding the problem won't help with that. A well thought out list always helps !

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Old 02-25-2014, 07:50 PM   #3
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Their is so much information and misinformation in the world we live in! I don't know for sure but heard your yeast will start dying after about 30 minutes, because they are hungry and don't have anything to eat, I have no idea how long you can actually wait.

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Old 02-25-2014, 07:50 PM   #4
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I usually let it sit for at least 2 hours. It's not really something I do intentionally because I think it benefits the yeast. I just like to have it ready once the wort is at the correct temperature so it's one of the first things I do.


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Old 02-25-2014, 07:51 PM   #5
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Without knowing the technical details and the optimum time to wait, I would be temped to sprinkle into the wort dry, as opposed to waiting 5 hours.

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Old 02-25-2014, 07:56 PM   #6
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By the way after i rehidrated my dry yeast in 90-100F water, should i wait until it cools down to 65-70F before pitching?

The reason i ask this is strongly related to the thread. I mean sometimes it takes longer than 30 minutes for my rehidrated yeast to cool down to room temp.

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Old 02-25-2014, 08:00 PM   #7
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I did this on accident once. I hydrated my yeast (BRY-97) then something came up, so I wasn't able to pitch for about 3 or 4 hours. The beer did not turn out great. It attenuated okay, but it took forever to get going, and there was a flaw in the final beer that I couldn't pinpoint...I always attributed it to the yeast sitting out too long. Whether or not that is true, I have no idea. And I wasn't about to try repeating the experiment.

I know, I'm not being super helpful here. But I thought I would pass along my anecdote.

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Old 02-25-2014, 08:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
By the way after i rehidrated my dry yeast in 90-100F water, should i wait until it cools down to 65-70F before pitching?

The reason i ask this is strongly related to the thread. I mean sometimes it takes longer than 30 minutes for my rehidrated yeast to cool down to room temp.
You should be letting your yeast rehydrate for 15-20 minutes anyway. It should be cool enough by then. I'd say just pitch it. BTW, if it's still hot at 30 minutes, you might be using too much water. I rehydrate in a very wide, shallow vessel...more surface contact for the yeast. By the time I pitch, it's cooled to room temp.
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Old 02-25-2014, 08:15 PM   #9
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The risk of the rehydrated yeast being woken up with not much to eat bothers me, what about rehydrating as instructed, then at about one hour giving it a some weak wort to stop them fading away, then pitch later.

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Old 02-25-2014, 08:20 PM   #10
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My idea came from reading Clayton Cone's (of Lallemond) response on an old HBD post.

We recommend that the rehydrated yeast be added to the wort within 30
minutes. We have built into each cell a large amount of glycogen and
trehalose that give the yeast a burst of energy to kick off the growth
cycle when it is in the wort. It is quickly used up if the yeast is
rehydrated for more than 30 minutes. There is no damage done here if it is
not immediatly add to the wort. You just do not get the added benefit of
that sudden burst of energy.


Of course the problem is he says it's not a problem if the yeast "is not immediately added to the wort", he doesn't specify how long it would take for it to be a problem....

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