New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermeneter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Bottling a Flanders Red




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-24-2009, 06:31 PM   #1
cmgray
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ
Posts: 81
Default Bottling a Flanders Red

I brewed up 2 batches of flanders red last May and will be bottling them in the next couple of months.

My question is if I want to bottle condition them, should I add in some more yeast since they've been sitting for a year? Or if not, how long should I expect it to take to carbonate? Will it generally be slower than normal?

They need to be ready by the end of may for a wedding gift and I just want to make sure they're tip-top by then.

Thanks!



__________________

Visit www.brewtility.com Online brewing software and beer recipes database.

cmgray is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 08:42 PM   #2
squeekysheep
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Greenbay, WI
Posts: 276
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

if you don't add yeast it could take 2 + months to fully carb i had a batch of beer i bulk aged for 7 months and it still carbed i check the bottles every 2 weeks and it took 2 months. that was 7.5 % so i would guess the same.


new yeast would speed it up.



__________________

Battle Axe brewing

squeekysheep is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2009, 11:45 PM   #3
brewmonger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 169
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I've had a batch that didn't carb in the bottle at all. Should've added new yeast...

Any old dry yeast works, since the flavor profile of the beer is pretty well set, and its only a little bit that it needs to ferment. I often use champange yeast or nottingham dry ale yeast. Just make sure it is well mixed into the brew before bottling. I generally rack the beer onto the yeast in the bottling bucket or jug.

__________________
brewmonger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 03:11 AM   #4
cmdrico7812
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Portland, Michigan
Posts: 158
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

What about the bugs in the beer? What happens to the bacteria you put in the flanders to sour it (i.e. the Brett strains)? Do they die after the beer has aged long enough?

__________________

Beer...it's awesome.

Zwei Brüder Brauerei


Planning: Nutcastle Brown, Founder's Breakfast Stout
Primary: Apfelwein w/Cherry
Secondary: Flanders Red, ESB2, ESB3, Hobgoblin PM
Bottle: Black Beauty Honey Rye, Holiday Chestnut Ale, Grumpy Gnome IPA, Sumatran Espresso Stout, Apfelwein, All Jacked Up, Patriot's Amber, ESB1, Belgian Dubbel.

cmdrico7812 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 03:47 AM   #5
brewmonger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 169
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmdrico7812 View Post
What about the bugs in the beer? What happens to the bacteria you put in the flanders to sour it (i.e. the Brett strains)? Do they die after the beer has aged long enough?
If you are adding any additional sugars or malt at bottling to carbonate the beer, then you should add fresh yeast to ensure that is what that sugar does. Once the beer is carbed, those yeast will go dormant, and any lactic or brett bugs can keep on slowly doing what they have been for the last 9 or so months.

Since brett and lactic cultures are still working on the dextrins in the beer, they will still probably be there. But even if they digest things in the beer, they might not produce gas.

If you have lactic bugs, some varieties do not produce any Co2 at all, including most dairy strains, although they will quickly consume the sugars and sour the beer further.

Even if the lactic bugs are gas producers, simple sugars are much easier for lactics to consume than the dextrins they have slowly been working on for months. The lactics will probably get to the sugar before any small amount of dormant live yeast that may present. So your beer will carbonate fairly quickly, but it will be noticeably more sour than before you bottled it.

I can't say about Brett, I don't know if it will create Co2 or not, it might depend on what type of carbohydrate they are digesting. If it is sugar, it will most likely produce gas. But again, if there are lactic bugs present, the brett will be competing with them for the sugars.

You really should be adding yeast if you are adding sugar. However, if you aren't adding sugar, the beer may still carbonate if the strains present are gas producers, as they slowly work on the dextrins, but it will take time.
__________________
brewmonger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 04:18 AM   #6
Sixbillionethans
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Wauwatosa, WI
Posts: 162
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

This may a question better suited for the bottling forum, but I'll ask anyway. I also have a Flanders Red to bottle (mine won't be for another several months), I want to bottle it in a way to promote a long shelf life.

I know that oxidation is a killer for a finished beer, and I also believe that the yeast activity to carbonate a bottle is likely not enough to consume the air in the bottle.

Most beers I bottle are gone within 3 months, so shelf life is not my primary concern, but it may not be the case for this one. After aging this beer in a carboy for a year, I may want to keep some bottles for another 1-2 years.

Does anyone have any tried and true methods to reduce O2 levels in bottled beer? Perhaps squirting some of that wine saver gas into each bottle before capping?

__________________
Sixbillionethans is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 11:40 AM   #7
EvilTOJ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
EvilTOJ's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Portland, OR, Oregon
Posts: 6,468
Liked 34 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Wine saver gas is just CO2 in a little jet pack. While that will certainly work just fine, I've had beers, wine and cider bottled a year and never had any problems with oxidation.

__________________

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

EvilTOJ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 05:33 PM   #8
cmgray
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Flagstaff, AZ
Posts: 81
Default

Thanks for the advice, looks like I should add some yeast. I was thinking that would probably be the case.


@Sixbillionethans - You can get o2 absorbing caps that should suck up any that's left in the headspace if you're really concerned. Just be sure to soak them in warm water/sanitizer to activate them.

__________________

Visit www.brewtility.com Online brewing software and beer recipes database.

cmgray is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-25-2009, 09:20 PM   #9
brewmonger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 169
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I could be wrong, but I don't think that a little bit of oxygen is the head space of your bottle will be a problem. Splashing and aerating it while you are bottling is more likely to cause oxidative damage, at least that is what I have experienced with red wine.

__________________
brewmonger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-26-2009, 01:15 PM   #10
Sixbillionethans
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Wauwatosa, WI
Posts: 162
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Good advice all around. Thanks for the comments on bottling.

As I said, I haven't really had problems, but I'm looking for an insurance policy for some of my beer batches that I intend to age.

One thing I'll point out is the lengths that some commercial breweries are going to now with their bottling. O2 absorbing caps for most. And I've heard that some are purging with CO2 either before or after filling.



__________________
Sixbillionethans is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Flanders Project 09' Reverend JC Lambic & Wild Brewing 23 11-29-2011 09:37 PM
Bottling Oud Bruin/Flanders Brown??? dirt55 Bottling/Kegging 1 09-30-2009 02:29 AM
Oak in Flanders Red Jsta Porter Lambic & Wild Brewing 5 05-15-2009 01:26 AM
Flanders red? claphamsa Lambic & Wild Brewing 20 04-01-2009 03:58 PM
Flanders Red Recipe mgo737 Extract Brewing 2 12-29-2008 03:34 PM



Newest Threads