Strong Ale has been in primary fermentation for a week and it's still bubbling

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Alehouserock

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Should I transfer to secondary fermentation or just let it ferment until the airlock stops bubbling? The bubbling has slowed down to about 33% of what it was doing on days 2 and 3.

I don't know what facts matter but this is a 9.2 abv

I didn't want to take the airlock off to take a reading until I was sure.

Should I wait until Monday or Tuesday?
 

MBasile

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Wait a few more weeks, then transfer once you've had a stable hydro reading for 3 consecutive 24-hour periods.

Others will tell you not to bother with a secondary and just leave it in primary for a while.

Either way, bigger beers take longer to ferment.
 
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Alehouserock

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Wait a few more weeks, then transfer once you've had a stable hydro reading for 3 consecutive 24-hour periods.

Others will tell you not to bother with a secondary and just leave it in primary for a while.

Either way, bigger beers take longer to ferment.
Thanks for the quick reply. :)


I use to live in Sunnyvale BTW. In the apartments on California and Mathilda.
 

Nurmey

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With a beer that big I would probably secondary after 4 weeks or so in the primary. It's going to have to age for a while and I think it's better to do it in bulk.
 
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Alehouserock

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With a beer that big I would probably secondary after 4 weeks or so in the primary. It's going to have to age for a while and I think it's better to do it in bulk.
It is better to age in the secondary or in the bottle?
 

Revvy

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And Get out of the habit of thinking the airlock is anything other than a vent to release excess co2 and you will be much happier. Your beer will ferment whether or not the airlock bubbles. It a vent to release excess co2, NOT a fermentation gauge.

airlock bubbling, lack of airlock bubbling, stopped airlock bubbling, fast airlock bubbling, slow airlcok bubbling, heavy metal airlcok bubbling, or disco airlock bubbling really is not an indicator of what is happening to your beer, really isn't important, and it is NOT an accurate gauge of fermentation.

If your airlock was bubbling and stopped---It doesn't mean fermentation has stopped.

If you airlock isn't bubbling, it doesn't mean your fermentation hasn't started....

If your airlock starts bubbling, it really doesn't matter.

If your airlock NEVER bubbles, it doesn't mean anything is wrong or right.

Your airlock is not a fermentation gauge, it is a VALVE to release excess co2.

So get out of the habit of thinking that an airlock bubble it telling you anything.

Often co2 production/airlock bubbling winds down long before the yeast are done doing their thing. And if you rack to secondary, or even bottle based on that, you could end up with stuck fermentations or bottle bombs.

Especially with a big beer like that.....That is a beer where after a certain point the yeasts are going to slow down...but still chew through all the sugars, but not necessarily in any way that may blip your airlock.

The only way to truly know what is going on in your fermenter is with your hydrometer. Like I said here in my blog, which I encourage you to read, Think evaluation before action you sure as HELL wouldn't want a doctor to start cutting on you unless he used the proper diagnostic instuments like x-rays first, right? You wouldn't want him to just take a look in your eyes briefly and say "I'm cutting into your chest first thing in the morning." You would want them to use the right diagnostic tools before the slice and dice, right? You'd cry malpractice, I would hope, if they didn't say they were sending you for an MRI and other things before going in....

Fermentation is not always "dynamic," just because you don't SEE anything happening, doesn't mean that any-thing's wrong,, and also doesn't mean that the yeast are still not working diligently away, doing what they've been doing for over 4,000 years..
 

beerlover_NZ

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And Get out of the habit of thinking the airlock is anything other than a vent to release excess co2 and you will be much happier. Your beer will ferment whether or not the airlock bubbles. It a vent to release excess co2, NOT a fermentation gauge.

airlock bubbling, lack of airlock bubbling, stopped airlock bubbling, fast airlock bubbling, slow airlcok bubbling, heavy metal airlcok bubbling, or disco airlock bubbling really is not an indicator of what is happening to your beer, really isn't important, and it is NOT an accurate gauge of fermentation.

If your airlock was bubbling and stopped---It doesn't mean fermentation has stopped.

If you airlock isn't bubbling, it doesn't mean your fermentation hasn't started....

If your airlock starts bubbling, it really doesn't matter.

If your airlock NEVER bubbles, it doesn't mean anything is wrong or right.

Your airlock is not a fermentation gauge, it is a VALVE to release excess co2.

So get out of the habit of thinking that an airlock bubble it telling you anything.

Often co2 production/airlock bubbling winds down long before the yeast are done doing their thing. And if you rack to secondary, or even bottle based on that, you could end up with stuck fermentations or bottle bombs.

Especially with a big beer like that.....That is a beer where after a certain point the yeasts are going to slow down...but still chew through all the sugars, but not necessarily in any way that may blip your airlock.

The only way to truly know what is going on in your fermenter is with your hydrometer. Like I said here in my blog, which I encourage you to read, Think evaluation before action you sure as HELL wouldn't want a doctor to start cutting on you unless he used the proper diagnostic instuments like x-rays first, right? You wouldn't want him to just take a look in your eyes briefly and say "I'm cutting into your chest first thing in the morning." You would want them to use the right diagnostic tools before the slice and dice, right? You'd cry malpractice, I would hope, if they didn't say they were sending you for an MRI and other things before going in....

Fermentation is not always "dynamic," just because you don't SEE anything happening, doesn't mean that any-thing's wrong,, and also doesn't mean that the yeast are still not working diligently away, doing what they've been doing for over 4,000 years..
I made that mistake the other week with my very first brew I relied on the airlock because that is what the brew kit instruction book told me (that book has now been filed in the garbage can) causing me to bottle way too early and dI am lucky to not have any split PET bottles. I now only go by the hydrometer and not that blinkin airlock.
 
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