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srm775

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Just wondering if anyone had any recommendations for online investment sites? Of, if anyone has suggestions of sites to stay away from. I'd be interested in hearing any experiences (positive or negative) for any sites any of you have used.
 

Soulive

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I've used ING Direct and currently HSBC Direct. I recommend either of them, although I think HSBC's current rate is slightly higher...

edit - sorry I was thinking savings, but I use Schwab online for my IRA and I'm happy
 
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srm775

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Soulive said:
I've used ING Direct and currently HSBC Direct. I recommend either of them, although I think HSBC's current rate is slightly higher...
Per transaction rate? Which do you think has better research tools? Which would you recommend for a novice/casual investor? Do you think the higher rates are justified (i.e. do they give you more bang for your buck)?

Any sites you'd stay away from?
 

Soulive

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srm775 said:
Per transaction rate? Which do you think has better research tools? Which would you recommend for a novice/casual investor? Do you think the higher rates are justified (i.e. do they give you more bang for your buck)?

Any sites you'd stay away from?
With Schwab, I don't pay fees but its an IRA. They give me free advice, but its minimal. I would avoid eTrade as they're on shakey ground right now...
 

Dr Vorlauf

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I use vanguard and Fidelity. Good security and low cost structure ( especially with Vanguard ).

Your choice will be determined by investment goals ( the ones I mentioned above are probably not the best if you want to do day trading... but nice for a 401K , IRA, 529 etc)
 
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srm775

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Dr Vorlauf said:
I use vanguard and Fidelity. Good security and low cost structure ( especially with Vanguard ).

Your choice will be determined by investment goals ( the ones I mentioned above are probably not the best if you want to do day trading... but nice for a 401K , IRA, 529 etc)
Didn't even think of Vanguard ... I have a 403b and IRA with them. They're an investment firm as well, correct?

With the market as low as it is right now, I figure now is the best time to buy low and wait to sell high. I'm thinking of doing a little investing in individual stocks (nothing like day trading), IPO's and maybe bonds when the interest rates start to climb.
 

hagen505

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Why would you say to avoid etrade? because they are on shakey ground? I have noticed that their stock is way down, but if they went under would that be a big deal if you had investments through them? I mean if they went under, you would still have your shares of the stock that you hold, right?
 

cj8scrambler

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+1 for Scottrade. The regular account has basic research tools. The mutual fund selector tool is good. The stock data is more than I understand. I believe you can upgrade to a 'pro' account and get all kinds of fancy trending data.

I've had accounts with ETrade and Ameritrade in the past, but they both started charging me fees for account inactivity (no trades in 6 months). That got me to switch to Scottrade about 4 years ago and I've been happy with them.
 

Lanfox

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one bad thing about scottrade is that its money market account has a low interest rate.
 

EricK The Red

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Buy Real Estate while the market is in the ****ter! I'm a Real Estate agent (part-time) and I've seen some nice returns in 2-5 years.

Better than most money market & index fund returns.
 

JVD_X

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srm775 said:
Just wondering if anyone had any recommendations for online investment sites? Of, if anyone has suggestions of sites to stay away from. I'd be interested in hearing any experiences (positive or negative) for any sites any of you have used.
Investing or trading?

If you are investing using Morningstar to identify some no load funds that accepts direct investments.

If you are trading try www.zecco.com - if you keep 2500 in your account then you get 10 free trades a month. This is a bargain. They also have great option costs - although I haven't seen if they offer straddles.

Personally, I use zecco and sharebuilder for transactions, charts.com for technicals and morningstar for fundamental analysis.
 

JVD_X

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hagen505 said:
Why would you say to avoid etrade? because they are on shakey ground? I have noticed that their stock is way down, but if they went under would that be a big deal if you had investments through them? I mean if they went under, you would still have your shares of the stock that you hold, right?
eTrade is not in trouble - they got hit like every one else in financials and then someone started a rumor and it snowballed. Personally, if I was open to another buy, I would go after eTrade.

On the other hand, eTrade doesn't have a very wide moat - anyone will be able to replicate and improve on their business model, like Zecco - so the key for them will be to continue going after new business and reduce their cost centers to become more competitive to new market incursions.

They just got some new management to shore things up. I think they are ripe for a takeover, similar to what happened with ING and Sharebuilder. Personally, I am thinking Wachovia.
 

joejaz

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I do my trading with TD Amertrade, they have a good platform. I've done some daytrading and had no problem with execution. They have some good tools available, "Advanced Analyzer". I have my 401K with Fidelity and they have good research available to clients. They also have stock screeners and back testing stratagies. The problem with research is that you will get a lot of conflicting opinions. Marketwatch.com, MSN, Yahoo financial, Kiplinger are some good sights and Kiplinger magazine(only $12 for yearly subscription) is well worth it. Investors Business Daily, subscription expensive, you can get it at your library. Don't listen to Mad Money Cramer and don't listen to people who want to give you stock tips. Do your own research. And remember index funds beat 90% of managed mutual funds with lower fees. And don't buy loaded funds. All that said, the market is kinda rough right now, but if you have balls now is the time to buy, "when there's blood in the streets".
 
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srm775

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atarlecky said:
Investing or trading?
What's the difference? I'm planning on buying and selling, not too often, individual stocks, IPO's and perhaps some bonds once interest rates begin to rise and bond prices come down.
 

The Pol

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We use Schwab.. very happy with it
 
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srm775

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So, does anyone have any good recommendations on investment books (i.e. online investing for dummies, stocks for dummies, etc.)?
 

Flyin' Lion

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srm775 said:
So, does anyone have any good recommendations on investment books (i.e. online investing for dummies, stocks for dummies, etc.)?
I just bought David Swenson's book, he manages the edowment for Yale University. Oddly enough, I learned of its existence on Tuesday Morning Quarterback.

Swensen's 2005 book "Unconventional Success" is also the best personal-investment guide on the market. Unlike the phony junk in the get-rich-quick aisles of bookstores -- "How to Become a Billionaire in Twenty Seconds with Nothing Down" -- Swensen's advice is specific and practical. I commend "Unconventional Success" as containing all that most people need to know about rational investment decisions and retirement saving.
 

JVD_X

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srm775 said:
What's the difference? I'm planning on buying and selling, not too often, individual stocks, IPO's and perhaps some bonds once interest rates begin to rise and bond prices come down.

Very generally speaking:


Investing = buy and hold for the long term

day trading = buying or selling a security (or whatever) at the beginning of the day and closing out before the end-of-day

Swing trading = holding (or selling short) a security over a number of days.

These are important distinctions but I don't want to make to many generalizations because I can't speak for everyone. Warren Buffet is an investor - he actually cares if a company is going to succeed. Day traders don't generally care about the long term outlook for a company (again a generalization - r.e. options) just what the price action is, and general use technical analysis to determine when and what to buy or sell.
 

JVD_X

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srm775 said:
What's the difference? I'm planning on buying and selling, not too often, individual stocks, IPO's and perhaps some bonds once interest rates begin to rise and bond prices come down.
IPO's - for the good ones you almost always have to get invited to participate. What most companies do NOT want to happen is that a bunch of day traders will buy and then immediately sell their stocks.

Stocks worth buying in an IPO (few and far between IMHO) really only want the market makers to buy (i.e. large brokerages and their 'highly-qualified' investors), because they are more likely to hold the stock and allow it's price to stabilize before flushing the market with shares. Again, this is one of my generalizations. It's been my experience that very few companies go IPO these days, that don't have to. IPO is kind of a last ditch effort to raise cash that private equity wouldn't touch. If private equity won't touch it - why should you?
 
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